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Holberton School

Beirut, Bogotá, Cali, Medellín, New Haven, San Francisco, Tulsa, Tunis

Holberton School

Avg Rating:4.4 ( 78 reviews )

Holberton School is a two-year software engineering school with campuses in San Francisco, New Haven, Tulsa, Bogotá, Medellin, Cali, and Tunisia that trains individuals to become Full Stack Software Engineers. The school's mission is to train the next generation of software developers through 100% hands-on learning. The bootcamp is broken into three different components. Students complete the 9-month Foundations school then a 6-month internship follwed by a 9-month Specializations course. 

The curriculum adopts a project-based, peer learning approach. As an alternative to college and in lieu of formal classes, students solve increasingly complicated programming challenges with minimal instruction. Students will develop resourcefulness as they search for the tools they need to solve these challenges while working with their peers. Rather than focusing on tools and frameworks, students at Holberton "learn to learn" and develop problem-solving skills. Throughout the course of the program, students work on industry-level projects and build their own applications.

Holberton School is free until students find a job and is open to anyone over 18 years old. No programming experience is required. Admission to Holberton School is based only on talent and motivation, with no consideration given to gender, nationality, ethnicity, age or social status. Holberton School mentors ensure that the Holberton curriculum stays up to date. Holberton mentors work for rising startups and top-tier Silicon Valley companies such as Google, Apple, LinkedIn, Tesla and Airbnb.

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  • Full-Stack | Project-based curriculum

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    Start Date September 8, 2020
    CostN/A
    Class size50
    LocationNew Haven, Medellín, Bogotá, San Francisco, Tunis, Cali, Tulsa
    At Holberton School Tulsa, we offer a two year, Full-Stack Software Engineering curriculum with reduced Income Share Agreement and Need-Based Living Assistance. Students who attend Holberton School Tulsa can take advantage of a $1500/month need-based living assistance, and for students who live and work in Tulsa after graduation, students can see their ISA repayment rate reduced to 10% of their income for 3.5 years after graduation, effectively cutting the cost of their schooling almost in half. Holberton School's Full Stack, project-based learning curriculum is divided into two sections: Foundations - Students enter the first part of Holberton's curriculum with no prior coding experience required. Through our unique project-based curriculum, students will be presented with programming and technical challenges of increasing difficulty and complexity, and through individual and group projects, students will develop a deeper understanding of core programming skills and techniques. Holberton's Full Stack Software Engineering curriculum starts our students off with Foundations, a program designed to help our students learn the core skills of becoming a well-paid software engineer. This curriculum starts with command line interfaces and C, and over the course of the first nine months, will teach students low level languages like C, higher level languages like Python and JavaScript, data structure and algorithms, Unix programming and scripting, infrastructure design and management, systems and security, and more. Through our true Full Stack approach, students will learn front end and back end development, DevOps, and supplementary professional skills that will help our students take on any development role they are interested in. After Foundations, students may opt into one of our four Specializations: Low Level & Algorithms, AR/VR, Full Stack Web Development, and Machine Learning. Using the same learning techniques students developed through their Foundations program, students can drill down on a specific programming field that is the most interesting to them. Examples of Holberton projects a student may work on: - Clone Twitter and a service of your choice such as Airbnb - Build a search engine - Code your own shell - Create a computer virus - Contribute to an open source project - Build secure and scalable infrastructures that support your applications - Organize meetups - Interview industry leaders - Student projects are open-sourced online on the project host of their choice.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansHolberton School uses Income Sharing Agreements to fund student education. After students obtain a well paying job, students will pay back a fixed percentage of their income for 3.5 years. Additional details at holbertonschool.com.
    Refund / GuaranteeStudent may withdraw within the first 30 days with no money owed.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelNo experience required
    Prep WorkStudents complete first part of curriculum as application process
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    September 8, 2020 - New Haven Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - New Haven Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - Tunis Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Tunis Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - Bogotá Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Bogotá Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - Cali Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Cali Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - Medellín Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Medellín Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - Tulsa Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Tulsa Apply by January 3, 2021
    September 8, 2020 - San Francisco Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - San Francisco Apply by January 3, 2021
  • Full Stack with Living Assistance and Reduced ISA

    Apply
    Start Date September 8, 2020
    CostN/A
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationTulsa
    At Holberton School Tulsa, we offer a two year, Full-Stack Software Engineering curriculum with reduced Income Share Agreement and Need-Based Living Assistance. Students who attend Holberton School Tulsa can take advantage of a $1500/month need-based living assistance, and for students who live and work in Tulsa after graduation, students can see their ISA repayment rate reduced to 10% of their income for 3.5 years after graduation, effectively cutting the cost of their schooling almost in half. Holberton School's Full Stack, project-based learning curriculum is divided into two sections: Foundations - Students enter the first part of Holberton's curriculum with no prior coding experience required. Through our unique project-based curriculum, students will be presented with programming and technical challenges of increasing difficulty and complexity, and through individual and group projects, students will develop a deeper understanding of core programming skills and techniques. Holberton's Full Stack Software Engineering curriculum starts our students off with Foundations, a program designed to help our students learn the core skills of becoming a well-paid software engineer. This curriculum starts with command line interfaces and C, and over the course of the first nine months, will teach students low level languages like C, higher level languages like Python and JavaScript, data structure and algorithms, Unix programming and scripting, infrastructure design and management, systems and security, and more. Through our true Full Stack approach, students will learn front end and back end development, DevOps, and supplementary professional skills that will help our students take on any development role they are interested in. After Foundations, students may opt into one of our four Specializations: Low Level & Algorithms, AR/VR, Full Stack Web Development, and Machine Learning. Using the same learning techniques students developed through their Foundations program, students can drill down on a specific programming field that is the most interesting to them. Examples of Holberton projects a student may work on: - Clone Twitter and a service of your choice such as Airbnb - Build a search engine - Code your own shell - Create a computer virus - Contribute to an open source project - Build secure and scalable infrastructures that support your applications - Organize meetups - Interview industry leaders - Student projects are open-sourced online on the project host of their choice.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansIncome Share Agreement with reduced repayment percentage if students live and work in Tulsa after attending school. Additional details on holbertonschool.com
    Refund / GuaranteeStudent may withdraw within the first 30 days with no money owed.
    Scholarship$1500/mo need-based living assistance available. Additional details on holbertonschool.com
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelNo prior coding experience necessary.
    Prep WorkApplication process serves as necessary prep work.
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
    More Start Dates
    September 8, 2020 - Tulsa Apply by August 16, 2020
    January 25, 2021 - Tulsa Apply by January 3, 2021

Shared Review

  • Electra Chong  User Photo
    Electra Chong • Software Engineer • Student Verified via GitHub
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    Full disclosure: I was part of the first experimental batch at Holberton School, which was granted full reprieve from the tuition model.

    Overview (lengthy, skip to get to my subjective review if you're more interested in my personal experience than a discussion of the school's model)

    This school operates like a Silicon Valley start-up, all the way down to the funding. The school raised venture capital to be able to train students without charging up-front tuition. Instead, the school operates on a deferred payment model where a portion of your salary (17.5% the last I checked) is paid to the school for three years once you obtain your first software engineering job.

    As the school touts, there are some positive implications to this payment model. The school only benefits from your enrollment if you are successful, so you can trust they are truly invested in your learning. There is less up-front risk to enrolling, and the model is more accessible to those with less savings who cannot afford to pay tuition for a school until they actually reap the benefits of their training.

    That said, 17.5% of your salary is no trivial slice of your salary and earning potential to just hand over. Depending on the bootcamp (which Holberton does not identify as), tuition can cost as little as $2000 for a month-long bootcamp to $18000 (HackReactor), or $60,000 for a 2-year-long program similar to Holberton in length (MakeSchool).

    [Skip in-depth calculations if desired]

    Let's say you earn a cool $85,000 as your starting salary as a software engineer (lower end in Silicon Valley, depending if you start at a small start-up or larger $$$ company). Ignoring the salary raises you can expect to get within your first few years as a SWE, 17.5% of that salary over three years totals to $44,625. The salary you can expect to take home after taxes is $41,225 (usually ~$56,000 without the 17.5% cut). You can expect to be frugal your first three years as a software engineer if you live in SF, a very expensive city, but it should cover housing and living costs adequately and still let you earn some small savings, according to my calculations. You should do your own, estimating living costs.

    Anyway, you might be wondering why you would want to fork over 17.5% of your salary for three years to this school, other than the neat fact that you don't have to pay for the cost of the school up-front, when there are other more cost-effective bootcamps in the range of $3,000-$4,000 out there.

    Those bootcamps are usually only one to a few months long. That's long enough to probably learn one framework well and build a functioning web app and ship it. This is a crucial experience that can help you get hired at a start-up. There are definitely people that have been hired successfully out of a bootcamp and have gone on to thrive as programmers.

    Unfortunately, a few months at a bootcamp is not really sufficient to build a strong foundation and understanding of software engineering, in my humble opinion. Holberton does not attempt to teach you a single framework but instead aspires to train you to become a versatile full-stack software engineer who can learn new tools + languages easily and debug systems, thanks to a strong foundation and good soft skills.

    There are the three main areas Holberton focuses on in their goal of training good full-stack software engineers, which are reflected in the curriculum tracks: low-level, high-level and sysadmin/devops. This means you will learn about how computer programs work at the low-level (such as pointers, memory allocation and typical data structures) by building your own C library from scratch. You will learn about higher-level programming concepts like object-oriented programming and the model-view-controller paradigm, and how APIs work by building them. You will also work on remote servers, learn to use the command line, deploy firewalls and dns servers, and set up databases for your apps.

    Holberton actually pitches itself as an alternative to traditional 4-year universities which offers degrees in CS. Unlike universities, where the curriculum is often theory-heavy, taught passively and centered around academia, what you learn at Holberton is highly oriented towards the skills you will need on the job in the industry. There are no instructor-led lectures, other than some live coding sessions; instead, you learn to collaborate with peers and to learn from resources you find on your own to complete projects which are assigned through the school’s intranet. Best -- no student loans.

    Onto my subjective review of my personal experience!

    I personally found Holberton’s hands-on method of learning to be very engaging. There was always excitement about what we were learning to do. It was a contrast to an Intro to Computer Science class I took in college, which involved a lot more textbook reading and weekly labs where we built small Java programs. That was all right, but nothing thrilling (and was why I opted not to major in CS in college).

    One thing I feel that makes Holberton different from any other school is that I felt the founders were personally invested in making sure we were learning to be good software engineers. I feel other bootcamps are fairly impersonal and mostly about generating revenue by training you to be a software engineer. Training good software engineers is a passion of Julien and Sylvain (co-founders of the school), who themselves worked at fancy tech companies (Docker, LinkedIn) and saw the shortage of quality junior talent in the Silicon Valley.

    Was I successful after I attended this school? Yes, I think so - I started working a full-time job after nine months of training and was able to adapt to the role quickly. One of the strong advantages of the school is that Julien and Sylvain also had many connections in the tech industry from years of working in it themselves prior to starting the school. As French engineers, they started a global French engineer network called while42 prior to Holberton, and they draw upon the pool of connections they have at companies throughout the Silicon Valley for mentors for the school and job connections for students.

    This relates to another important aspect of the school, which is that it strives to teach soft skills in addition to the technical skills needed to be a good software engineer. In addition to the project-based and collaborative curriculum, the school often hosts meet-ups which are open (and free) to the public with Holberton’s mentors. Your social network and ability to work with others are some of the most important assets you have for your career as a software engineer, and the school understands and encourages this.

    The strong community feel was one aspect that had a huge impact my experience. The students come from a broad range of backgrounds, thanks to Holberton’s accessible application process (no previous experience necessary, no bars on age) and tuition model. You become very close with the other students at school due to spending so much time at the school, working together. I valued my own batch and several that followed had a decent gender balance (generally around 40:60 female:male), which is atypical of Silicon Valley in general.

    Please keep in mind that the curriculum is very intensive, and you will be spending most of your time at school trying to complete projects by deadlines. As much as I enjoyed the projects, I’m susceptible to burnout (having experienced it in college before), and you have to take care to protect yourself from it during this program. It’s all right to take a step back and have some time on the weekend after the first few months -- you will need it to sustain yourself.

    Something that deserves to be acknowledged is that students have dropped out of the program or decided to repeat the curriculum when they could not keep up with the pace. Julien and Sylvain’s earnest goal is to train anyone to be a programmer as long as they have the drive and collaborative mindset, regardless of prior experience. However, being able to adjust to the unfamiliar ways of thinking for programming can be a challenge and require substantial time and practice in some cases.

    It’s definitely easier if you have are familiar with the thinking required for math and science subjects. If you feel these are weak subjects for you, I suggest trying to familiarize yourself with programming a bit in advance with the abundance of online or local resources available. It’s not impossible if you don’t, but it will be harder. Be prepared to ask for help when you need it, and to learn how to problem solve without giving up!

    Other considerations -

    You will need to be able to handle the cost of living in the Bay Area for the duration of the program if you are moving. This may require savings and budgeting.

    The school is still fairly new (close to 2 years at time of writing), and the founders/staff are refining the curriculum and resources available with the start of each batch. Ideally, they will be able to assist with the cost of living or relocating to the Bay Area of the school one day, but this is a future goal you will need to inquire about to find out the current status.

    Final word:

    Would I have attended Holberton School if it were not free for my batch? Probably not, for reasons totally unrelated to the quality of education. I come from a low-income background and am quite financially risk-averse, so even though the tuition is not charged up-front, I wouldn’t be able to tolerate both the cost of relocating to SF and the subsequent salary cut without additional resources or scholarships.

    I might have ended up going to School 42, a free school in Fremont, because of these reasons. However, the culture at School 42 and Holberton School are far different (theirs is more of an elitist sink-or-swim hands-off model, and the gender balance is terrible in comparison), and I personally vastly prefer the education, support and community feel that Holberton provides. As it is, I lucked out and am super grateful for everything I have gained from attending Holberton.

    My advice is to do your research, look into all the various boot-camps and alternatives out there, and find the one that best fits your personal preferences in terms of learning experience. Finally, balance that consideration with your needs regarding length of program and cost. Good luck!

  • Scam
    - 3/6/2020
    Hen  User Photo
    Hen • Verified via LinkedIn
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    "Bad business practices, illegal contracts, fake statistics, deceiving marketing”

    They give out ISAs without approval from the government.
    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2020/02/26/san-francisco-based-holberton-coding-school-facing-fraud-accusations-from-former-students/They committed fraud to get authorized as a school. Look it up on the BPPE’s website.They expel anyone who can’t keep up with their sink or swim methodology, or anyone who challenges their way of operating.The curriculum is all curated and half of it’s written by students.They drastically overpriced the program.The course changes every month, so good luck getting what you signed up for. Doesn’t prepare you for the job market. Most students have to teach themselves all the skills required to land a job. No actual mentorship or career coaching.If you get a job paying over $40k you still owe them. I know at least a dozen students who owe them back and don’t have coding jobs.Stay far away from this school. It’s not as perfect as it seems in their marketing.
  • Amy   User Photo
    Amy • SRE • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    I attended Holberton school from January to October 2018 after a close friend attended for free as part of their first cohort.  My review has a lot of negative and positive points but ultimately, my choice led to a successful career change, but not without a hefty price tag related to living jobless in San Francisco and signing over a large chunk of my income in the deal.  I wish I had done more research into alternatives before signing on, but it wasn't all bad.

    Because I was in the 5th cohort and based on the enthusiastic marketing I thought that the problems my friend experienced would be worked out, as they were in a new location, had many seemingly successful graduates and had expanded their staff.  Instead I found a rigorous but partially complete curriculum with a lot of typos they made the students responsible for catching and reporting.  I eventually gave up reporting errors to the staff because it was getting in the way of my project work.  It may not seem like a big deal, but when you don't understand the vocabulary and technology, poorly translated and misspelled curriculum makes the "Google it" curriculum difficult to follow, because you don't know when it's an error or just a term you're not familiar with.  The staff told me in one on one meetings that copy editing was not in the budget, but in the months since I left Holberton school, they've expanded to something like 8 more campuses.  In the end, though, I went from having a little command line and CSS experience to being able to get some stuff running in C, which impresses people who think all boot camps are front end scripting only.

    I got to know some of the students in their advertising posters and learned that they were using at least one of them with the caption "I am a software engineer" while they were still a student at the school, and the photos they used were taken by another student. Both of those students have successfully found jobs since then. When promotional photos were taken at the school they made up a reason for everyone to be on campus that day without telling us ahead of time that photographers and videographers would be on site.  Then they singled out the only students of color in the entire building and featured them prominently in advertising, but the actual student body did not reflect their claims of diversity. Every student in those pictures is now among Holberton's biggest critics. Other students told me they felt people of color were not only overlooked but often more discouraged than their white peers, and when I brought this concern to the student support staff, they literally told me I was experiencing "group think."  When I launched a campaign to have a sexist quote removed from the wall of the school, their response was to ask me repeatedly to remove the online petition and then they retaliated by speaking to the CTO of my company about it.  To their credit, they did remove the quote but feigned ignorance as to why it would be offensive.  

    Lastly, I am one of the students who came to Holberton with the most information about what I was getting myself into, but found through talking to my peers that they were led to believe certain things about the curriculum and the payment structure that were different when they actually experienced the program.  I got an internship through my company's connection to the school, but this only happened for a handful of the 54 people who started with my cohort, the rest were put into an extremely rigorous job hunting process that I think was devised to cover Holberton if hiring numbers didn't meet expectations.  If someone couldn't find a job, it would be easy to say, "Oh well that person didn't send out x number of cold applications every week and we expelled them). Other examples are the advertised 3 year payment period (it's actually 3.5 years whether you get an internship or not), the second year specialization curriculum (more marketing fodder than practical expansion on the roles students actually end up in and from what I understand not entirely complete).  The supposedly very selective application process was probably the biggest shock to me.  I spent a lot of time on my application, especially the essay, only to find out that the entire process is automated to the point that they never read, watch, or view anything you submit and they accept basically everyone who completes the application. some people in my cohort were accepted along with everyone in the room at their "group interview." But after making huge sacrifices to come to Holberton, often moving, borrowing money, quitting jobs, etc. many of us tried to stay the course anyway.  I tracked most of the people who completed the first 9 months and excepting the drop outs and people who were expelled, a majority of people *did* get some kind of tech job, but opinions vary on how much of a hand Holberton had in making it happen.

    Ultimately, as stated before, I got a job after going to Holberton but the tuition cost is twice that of my bachelor's degree.  I told myself in the beginning that this would be offset by Holberton being incentivized to make sure I got a job, only to find out that they accept everyone who applies and charge them the full 17% for 3.5 years if they complete even a fraction of the whole program whether they get a tech job or not.  I could have gone back to my pre-holberton job and still technically owe them the money, which I imagine was part of their business plan in the first place.
  • Pilar Pinto  User Photo
    Pilar Pinto • electronic engineering student • Student Verified via GitHub
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    Is the best school of software because you have learn a lot of things and you used every concept in the next project, and you start with C and learnt from the basis to the advanced topics in order to use that concepts in posterior python knowdledge 

  • amazing challenger
    - 11/19/2019
    Lady Marcela  User Photo
    Lady Marcela • Student of Software Engineer • Student Verified via GitHub
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    It's a great experience from every aspect, helps you grow personally and professionally, not only teach you programming also teach you soft skills to have a better performance in real life, create very strong ties with your peers, can make friends for life, as far as academics has a good management of the content they offer and encourage you to take out all the mental potential that one has, in general has been a great experience, maybe one thing that is against it is that many people do not have the ability to devote 100% to this program because of its hourly intensity, before entering the program many people have to save a large amount of money to be able to devote to study, I also feel that they should manage all the sites in the same way, because there are very significant differences in infrastructure and other administrative and academic issues of each site.

  • Farrukh  User Photo
    Farrukh • Student • Verified via LinkedIn
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    I started Holberton School in January 2019. Before that I had little experience in coding, I learned some Java, C++, and JavaScript by following tutorials on the Internet and asking some friends. At Holberton, I learned a lot in a short period of time and now I feel more confident in my coding skills. One good suggestion I can make about it is you should have some experience with coding or spend at least 2 months following some basic tutorials on the web because you will have some foundations to rely on.

  • Juan Marin  User Photo
    Juan Marin • Student • Verified via LinkedIn
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    N/A

    Is a really good program to develop all your endemic an non-endemic skills .The projects are designed to feed and boost your hungry for knowledge. The framework is a remarkable way to polish your knowledge by teching othes and  letting others help you.

  • Laura Roudge  User Photo
    Laura Roudge • Student Verified via LinkedIn
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    I am currently a student at Holberton School, in the middle of my first year (foundations).

    I already loved the innovative concept of the Income Share Agreement (ISA) before starting because I couldn't afford going to college or paying for a super-expensive bootcamp. Now I can focus on studying, and pay 17% of my salary for 3 years and a half once I land a job! Also, this makes the school super inclusive, and you can really feel that they're trying their best to bring more minorities in tech and I love it. The space we share is super safe, and absolutely everybody has the same chances of success.

    The culture at Holberton is what I like the best. Since the program is project-based and peer-learning based, we are constantly push to collaborate, help each other out and move forward together. I love this because in other schools I've been, the focus was always on obtaining the best grades and it made the atmosphere toxic. At Holberton, I have a real community I can rely on: peers, staff, alumni, mentors. Everybody will go out of their way to try and help you if you put the effort in.

    The curriculum is tough, so it might not be a one-size-fits-all type of school. There is a lot of material we cover, and we move quite fast. This is awesome for me because I really feel the progress on a day to day basis and I can tell I've gotten more confident on a variety of skills, both technical and soft. But it takes a lot of hard work and you have to be prepared for long, tiring weeks. Although I have to say it's been really rewarding and satisfying so far!

    In any case I would recommend giving the application a try because you have nothing to loose, and you get to learn how to build your first web page (yes, during the application process). And the application is totally free!

     

  • Ethan  User Photo
    Ethan • Student • Student Verified via LinkedIn
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    I'm writing as a student halfway into the program.
    Coming from a background of studying Computer Science's in high school and one year of communal college, I was in awe after coming here. I always felt the way I was learning wasn't very efficient. Starring at a professor hours at a time while he goes line through line of code - I was processing 10% of the information coming in. I took multiple online courses on my own and was already learning more than I did in months in school.
    But I wanted to take this one step further - I wanted a place that realized how to free ones full potential, and I think I found it. One thing that's extremely important to realize, it's not going to be easy. There's no 'easy' way of becoming a software engineer. You are going to have to work hours every single day and most weekends. You might feel at certain points that you can't do it, but you will get through those times.
    There are no formal teachers or classes at Holberton School. Everything you learn is through projects you do on a daily basis (sometimes more than a day). If you come across a problem you can't seem to figure out on your own, you will always have ~30 other friends around you who are going through the exact same thing. Of course not everything is self taught, and multiple days a week are mandatory to be on campus, in which you will go over the projects from the past few days in groups of peers. 
    If you're wondering if this is the best place for you, I think you have to know exactly what you want. If you're looking for some similar college experience (parties, less intense studies, etc.), this is not what you will find here. All of the students in this school are extremely motivated and focused, and thus are capable of working together in the best way. We all have one goal in common - to become software engineers. 
    Feel free to ask me any more questions - DM me on twitter @eitanmayer57

  • Jose Ferney   User Photo
    Jose Ferney • Student Verified via LinkedIn
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    I am from cohort 0 from Bogota Colombia and I just can say. if you are a person who wants to learn/improve your tech skills Holberton is the perfect place for you, therefore, you have to be willing to learn from scratch in a high-level. 
    Honestly, I learned more in three months here than a year in a traditional school. 
    Holberton has a disruptive method is not centralized only en tech skills also the program make you improve your social skills and make you learn how to work into a team. 
    They have an amazing curriculum you will learn about low-level programming, algorithms, high-level programming, Devops and more. 
    highly recommended

  • Robert  User Photo
    Robert • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    My experience at Holberton has been mostly positive. I will say that it is a commitment, and that I had to cut out various social aspects of my life to finish projects, but if you go into the program with the mindset of devoting large portions of your time to it, you'll be good to go.

    The content and projects were challenging and covered a wide spectrum in the realm of software engineering. I've attended one other coding bootcamp in SF and found it to be lacking in content and depth compared to Holberton. Even my college degree felt like a cakewalk compared to some of the projects I had to work through during the program.

    Another great aspect of the program is that it's okay to fail at something or not meet a deadline because you have the ability to resubmit the project after meeting with your peers and discussing the project. Peer learning is a huge aspect of the program, and it really helps to learn from your peers / see different methods of thinking and problem solving.

    Overall, I recommend this program to anyone who has the time and drive to really dedicate themselves to it. It can be difficult, time consuming, and exhausting, but ultimately worth it.

  • Omar Martínez  User Photo
    Omar Martínez • Software Engineer • Student Verified via GitHub
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    I love the self-training, learn the number of things I could find in reputable sources, I tried really hard to find something good enough to take as my professional route when I was close to taking my decision to be an entire autodidact. I meet Holberton, read the syllabus and feel secure that I finally could say, I find it, I found what I was looking for, the best way to learn the best technical abilities and engineer thinking, adding the possibility to interact with other extraordinary people in the tech industry, until the sun of today I still think the same, based on my experience I recommend Holberton School.

  • Kiren Srinivasan  User Photo
    Kiren Srinivasan • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via Github
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    Having gone through traditional university at NYU as an econ major, worked in the tech industry, and started my own startup, it was not easy to get an interview for any junior/intern developer position in tech. However, I was eventually able to get an iOS contract job at an early stage startup that took a chance on me for 3-4 months.

    It was after this iOS contract job that I started evaluating possible options for 1-2 year long coding schools (not a bootcamp, but not a traditional university) where I can grok foundational CS concepts (and their practical applications), build my own professional network, prepare for interviews, and, most importantly, learn how to learn. When trying to find a school that fit these criteria, I happened upon Holberton. It not only satisfied these criteria, but they were free upfront and would only charge me once I got a high-paying software engineering job through the ISA model. After doing my due diligence about the program and the people behind it, I was convinced and moved my life from NYC to SF.

    Year 1 was really tough, but I couldn’t have built those programming/CS muscles without the continuous cycle of “struggling, getting into a good rhythm, and drastically ratcheting up the difficulty.” Having been in the tech industry for a little while before Holberton, my favorite parts of the program were that it: incorporated peer-learning in a way that properly simulates what it’s actually like to work on a team, made everything project-based so that you were able to apply concepts in relevant scenarios, and did not have any formal teachers spoon-feed you knowledge.

    That being said, Holberton staff and TAs are always available if you do need help. However, as a student, you’re expected to use the resources that are given on projects, your peers around you, and Google to try to solve the problem at hand before “moving up the ladder.” If you’re asking your boss (technical or non-technical) a question that you can easily figure out through Google, you’re wasting her time. If you’re asking your boss a very-well framed, specific question that you’ve racked your brain over and thoroughly researched through Google and your peers, but couldn’t find the answer you were looking for, then you’re saving everyone’s time by asking the person high enough on the chain who probably does know what issues you’re having.

    I loved how Holberton approached education so much that, even after having ~10 interviews, I decided to immediately take the full-time offer at Holberton as their newest software engineer at the time. It’s almost been a year that I’ve been working here at Holberton and I’ve been learning at that same insane pace as I was as a student.

    If you have any questions about the program, feel free to tweet me @srinitude!

Thanks!