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Holberton School

Bogotá, Cali, Medellín, New Haven, San Francisco, Tulsa, Tunis

Holberton School

Avg Rating:4.67 ( 79 reviews )

Holberton School is a two-year software engineering school with campuses in San Francisco, New Haven, Tulsa, Bogotá, Medellin, Cali, and Tunisia that trains individuals to become Full Stack Software Engineers. The school's mission is to train the next generation of software developers through 100% hands-on learning.

The curriculum adopts a project-based, peer learning approach. As an alternative to college and in lieu of formal classes, students solve increasingly complicated programming challenges with minimal instruction. Students will develop resourcefulness as they search for the tools they need to solve these challenges while working with their peers. Rather than focusing on tools and frameworks, students at Holberton "learn to learn" and develop problem-solving skills. Throughout the course of the program, students work on industry-level projects and build their own applications.

Holberton School is free until students find a job and is open to anyone over 18 years old. No programming experience is required. Admission to Holberton School is based only on talent and motivation, with no consideration given to gender, nationality, ethnicity, age or social status.

Holberton School mentors ensure that the Holberton curriculum stays up to date. Holberton mentors work for rising startups and top-tier Silicon Valley companies such as Google, Apple, LinkedIn, Tesla and Airbnb. Mentors

Recent Holberton School Reviews: Rating 4.67

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  • Full-Stack | Project-based curriculum

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    CostN/A
    Class size50
    LocationNew Haven, Medellín, Bogotá, San Francisco, Tunis, Cali, Tulsa
    At Holberton School Tulsa, we offer a two year, Full-Stack Software Engineering curriculum with reduced Income Share Agreement and Need-Based Living Assistance. Students who attend Holberton School Tulsa can take advantage of a $1500/month need-based living assistance, and for students who live and work in Tulsa after graduation, students can see their ISA repayment rate reduced to 10% of their income for 3.5 years after graduation, effectively cutting the cost of their schooling almost in half. Holberton School's Full Stack, project-based learning curriculum is divided into two sections: Foundations - Students enter the first part of Holberton's curriculum with no prior coding experience required. Through our unique project-based curriculum, students will be presented with programming and technical challenges of increasing difficulty and complexity, and through individual and group projects, students will develop a deeper understanding of core programming skills and techniques. Holberton's Full Stack Software Engineering curriculum starts our students off with Foundations, a program designed to help our students learn the core skills of becoming a well-paid software engineer. This curriculum starts with command line interfaces and C, and over the course of the first nine months, will teach students low level languages like C, higher level languages like Python and JavaScript, data structure and algorithms, Unix programming and scripting, infrastructure design and management, systems and security, and more. Through our true Full Stack approach, students will learn front end and back end development, DevOps, and supplementary professional skills that will help our students take on any development role they are interested in. After Foundations, students may opt into one of our four Specializations: Low Level & Algorithms, AR/VR, Full Stack Web Development, and Machine Learning. Using the same learning techniques students developed through their Foundations program, students can drill down on a specific programming field that is the most interesting to them. Examples of Holberton projects a student may work on: - Clone Twitter and a service of your choice such as Airbnb - Build a search engine - Code your own shell - Create a computer virus - Contribute to an open source project - Build secure and scalable infrastructures that support your applications - Organize meetups - Interview industry leaders - Student projects are open-sourced online on the project host of their choice.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansHolberton School uses Income Sharing Agreements to fund student education. After students obtain a well paying job, students will pay back a fixed percentage of their income for 3.5 years. Additional details at holbertonschool.com.
    Refund / GuaranteeStudent may withdraw within the first 30 days with no money owed.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelNo experience required
    Prep WorkStudents complete first part of curriculum as application process
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewYes
  • Full Stack with Living Assistance and Reduced ISA

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    CostN/A
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationTulsa
    At Holberton School Tulsa, we offer a two year, Full-Stack Software Engineering curriculum with reduced Income Share Agreement and Need-Based Living Assistance. Students who attend Holberton School Tulsa can take advantage of a $1500/month need-based living assistance, and for students who live and work in Tulsa after graduation, students can see their ISA repayment rate reduced to 10% of their income for 3.5 years after graduation, effectively cutting the cost of their schooling almost in half. Holberton School's Full Stack, project-based learning curriculum is divided into two sections: Foundations - Students enter the first part of Holberton's curriculum with no prior coding experience required. Through our unique project-based curriculum, students will be presented with programming and technical challenges of increasing difficulty and complexity, and through individual and group projects, students will develop a deeper understanding of core programming skills and techniques. Holberton's Full Stack Software Engineering curriculum starts our students off with Foundations, a program designed to help our students learn the core skills of becoming a well-paid software engineer. This curriculum starts with command line interfaces and C, and over the course of the first nine months, will teach students low level languages like C, higher level languages like Python and JavaScript, data structure and algorithms, Unix programming and scripting, infrastructure design and management, systems and security, and more. Through our true Full Stack approach, students will learn front end and back end development, DevOps, and supplementary professional skills that will help our students take on any development role they are interested in. After Foundations, students may opt into one of our four Specializations: Low Level & Algorithms, AR/VR, Full Stack Web Development, and Machine Learning. Using the same learning techniques students developed through their Foundations program, students can drill down on a specific programming field that is the most interesting to them. Examples of Holberton projects a student may work on: - Clone Twitter and a service of your choice such as Airbnb - Build a search engine - Code your own shell - Create a computer virus - Contribute to an open source project - Build secure and scalable infrastructures that support your applications - Organize meetups - Interview industry leaders - Student projects are open-sourced online on the project host of their choice.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansIncome Share Agreement with reduced repayment percentage if students live and work in Tulsa after attending school. Additional details on holbertonschool.com
    Refund / GuaranteeStudent may withdraw within the first 30 days with no money owed.
    Scholarship$1500/mo need-based living assistance available. Additional details on holbertonschool.com
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelNo prior coding experience necessary.
    Prep WorkApplication process serves as necessary prep work.
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo

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  • Anonymous • Student
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    I have been learning to code on my own for a long time. It was a hobby, but when you wake up super early on a Sunday because you are excited about learning more, you start to wonder "what if I could do this every day?" But, as a 30-year-old woman, you think twice before changing career. Part of this reluctance was also coming from the fact, that despite hundreds of hours of MOOCS, I was still lacking a lot of understanding... I attended CS50 on edx, participated in the full-stack Nanodegree on Udacity and other courses on Udemy. These classes are good, but at the end, I was still not able to be a freelancer or to work for a startup. I kept on copying the examples without really understanding how the code worked. I could never re-write the code without looking at an example. Why are we using a dictionary, a list, a set? What does that imply? What are mutable and immutable objects? How do login sessions really work?

    A friend of mine told me that I would make a great software engineer if I get serious about it. He advised me to check out Holberton School. As a rockstar engineer himself, the fact that he was endorsing the school and especially the curriculum, was a big deal for me. He told me that I will learn what I need to be a real software engineer. Besides, another friend told me that the difference between a software engineer and a developer is the capacity for an SE to adapt and learn new things while developers trained in a 4-month bootcamp are a bit trapped in one framework and have difficulties doing anything else. 

    Holberton School's curriculum is really top-notch. Check it out on the website. I learned so many things I cannot list them all here. Here are a few: I learned how an Operating System works, how to program in C with linked list, binary trees, algorithms, how to program in Python, create a web application, an API, how to structure databases, how to configure a network with load balancers, firewalls and encryption, how to create scripts to deploy servers effectively, and so on. We code on Emacs or Vim, like students from classic engineering schools. Which is pretty badass given the reaction of other SE when I tell them that.

    The program lasts a little bit over 9 months because there is much to learn and if you feel a little bit more comfortable on some subjects you have optional tasks to go a bit deeper.
    I loved the peer learning. At my age, I would not have liked to attend conventional classes again. This system really works, when you play the game! After a project, everyone gathers and discuss how they solved the problems and why it worked this way. The more people challenge themselves and participate the greater the value. Essentially, at Holberton, you learn how to do things, but most importantly why you are doing this way.
    Overall my experience has been great. I'm at the end of year one and I really look forward to starting year 2.
    Another thing is that from the beginning we have mock interviews to practice soft skills and technical questions with whiteboarding and fake phone calls. This really prepares us for job search.

    I also really like the fact that the school is inclusive, respecting and encouraging minorities.
    Thanks for reading and excuse my grammar, English is not my mother tongue.

  • Anonymous • Student
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    I am a student at Holberton School. I chose this program over a master's degree because I only have to pay them after I am able to get a job. Holberton offered me the chance to change careers and make a real difference in my life. So far, in only a matter of months I've gone from someone who didn't know a thing about coding, to problem solving and working with peers. 

    Only one star for instructors because there aren't any. 

  • Anonymous • Student
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    Curriculum: Bash, C, Python, DevOps, and webdev. I give curriculum rating a 3 because it was helpful to learn about low level before moving on to high level programming. Also getting to work on soft skills is a good thing. But the webdev part seemed rushed and we only worked on one big project in bits and pieces at a time. I don't remember any CSS, JS, or other things like SQLalchemy since it was rushed. On the big project: I don't really understand all the parts or the "big picture" because they don't explain anything. The instructions are like this: task 1: do this. task 2: do that, without explaining why we're doing these things. So this was lazy on their part. It would've helped to do smaller webdev projects so that I could actually remember something.

    On assignments - I have mixed feelings on this because some things we only had a day or two of experience, like using awk, puppet, bash programming. After not doing it again, I don't remember any of it, so it was like those days didn't make me any better at programming.

    Peer learning days - very disorganized. It's the same thing as friends getting together to do an online course, but we're only talking about things we've already done. It would make more sense if we got together everyday for organized group activities like other bootcamps rather than talk about the homework we've already done. Other bootcamps seem to be far more organized.

    Instructors: my rating is a 1. There are no teachers, so our only in person help is other students. I would give a better rating if they at least had good explanations or a wiki to go along with the tasks, but the instruction is literally: "here's a task! read this link I found from the front page of a google search to learn more!" This is extremely lazy and is an insult to me as a student as it seems they're not investing in making helpful resources, and more invested in raising money and making tools. App Academy's online course is far more professional and resourceful, and it's now FREE.

    Cost: 17% of salary for 3.5 years if you make over $40k. This turns out to be expensive even if you don't get a software dev job. There are circumstances that allow them to extend the payment period, such as if you don't make over $40k, are unemployed, or go to another school after finishing Holberton. Can be extended for another 2 years.

    Overall: I'm glad to meet good people, but I feel like the education is very lazy. I don't feel prepared to get a software job and I think most students aren't prepared after a year. The majority of students haven't gotten a software job after 1 year in, check linkedin if you don't believe me. A lot of students end up in DevOps, which is not really software development and more about writing scripts and learning different tools.

  • Anonymous • site reliability engineer • Student
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    Lots of fun; each day is usually dedicated to tackling a project. Achieving the project tasks feels a lot like solving puzzle challenges, and you have peers tackling the same puzzles along side you, so if you get stuck you can start conferring with them. More like "doing" than "studying."

    During my time at Holberton I felt ownership over every day, since I had so much freedom about how to approach each project. If you're a self-directed individual, this school might be for you.

    Since you spend so much time with your peers, you end up with a strong sense of community that you take with you once you graduate. Your peers serve as your support network.

    A few caveats: it helps if you have some familiarity with basic programming conventions when you enter the program (if, else if, else conditions; for and while loops) since those can be hard to grasp at first and the curriculum moves quickly. More vital is basic problem solving skills - if you don't have those, you have to get them down in the first few months, otherwise you'll be stuck with a lot of projects you don't know how to tackle. If you have an instinct to decompose a problem into smaller task, you can identify knowledge gaps to resolve, and you can break down information from the Internet, you should be good.

    If you're able to keep up with the curriculum, you'll get trained up to be a successful software engineer, you'll get a deeper understanding of the industry than any bootcamp/college grad, and you'll have a lot of (career) opportunities you wouldn't have otherwise via the mentor network. So go for it if you think the project-based methodology suits you.

Thanks!