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Code Fellows

Online, Portland, Seattle

Code Fellows

Avg Rating:4.2 ( 124 reviews )

Code Fellows offers full and part-time software development courses online and in-person at their Seattle, Washington location. Since their first cohort in 2013, Code Fellows has taught over 1400 graduates and iterated on their curriculum and format to ensure students receive the most industry-relevant training as effectively and efficiently as possible. Students are immersed in their learning with daily lectures, pair programming, weekly presentations from full-time instructional staff who are professionals in the industry, one-week project sprints, and more. Code Fellows graduates work at Amazon, Microsoft, Zillow, Expedia, XBOX, NIKE, Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, and over 700 other companies.

The modular style of the Code Fellows program allows students to test into the course level that is most appropriate for their current skill level. In addition, the modular class structure allows students to choose the schedule and timing that meets their needs. Developers with some programming experience can test into an intermediate or advanced-level programming course, while novice coders can build their experience from the ground up, starting with an introductory course. Code Fellows also offers courses that run nights and weekends in-person or online to accommodate students who plan to continue working while going to school. 

Code Fellows’ 10-week Code 401 course is offered in four specializations: Python, full-stack JavaScript, Java, and ASP.NET Core. Most students generally choose to pursue one of these Code 401 specializations.

Recent Code Fellows Reviews: Rating 4.2

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  • Code 102: Intro to Software Development (Full-Time)

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week1 Week
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$1,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Not sure where or how to start learning JavaScript? Or maybe you’re discouraged by the confusing interfaces, unclear error messages, and unexplained concepts of online coding tutorials. If you’re ready to get unstuck and move beyond the concepts covered in Code 101, come work with experienced developers who can help guide you through your learning. Join us for Code 102! You’ll receive 30 hours of instruction as you blast through preparations for Code 201, while getting a tour of the tools and techniques of modern developers.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
     Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb

    Tuition PlansTuition due at registration.
    ScholarshipAt Code Fellows, we believe everyone should have the opportunity to develop. Learn More: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 102: Intro to Software Development (Part-Time)

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Agile
    OnlinePart Time20 Hours/week2 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$1,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    If you’re ready to get unstuck and move beyond the concepts covered in Code 101, come work with experienced developers who can help guide you through your learning. Join us for Code 102! You’ll receive 30 hours of instruction as you blast through preparations for Code 201, while getting a tour of the tools and techniques of modern developers.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 102: Intro to Software Development (Self-Paced)

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Scrum, Agile
    OnlinePart Time10 Hours/week4 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    CostN/A
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    If you’re ready to get unstuck and move beyond the concepts covered in Code 101, come work with experienced developers who can help guide you through your learning. Join us for Code 102! You’ll receive 30 hours of instruction as you blast through preparations for Code 201, while getting a tour of the tools and techniques of modern developers.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 201: Foundations of Software Development (Full-Time)

    Apply
    AngularJS, HTML, Git, JavaScript, Design, CSS, Front End, MVC, Agile, REST
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week4 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$5,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Build a strong software development foundation and learn how to use HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and various libraries to create fully-functional web apps. This course guides students toward developing a well-rounded foundation of skills necessary for modern web development. These skills include HTML, CSS, and JavaScript coding; utilizing Git workflow processes; project organization; designing with wireframing; and employing introductory Agile development methods. Daytime and Nights & Weekend tracks are each 160 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    Deposit500
    Financing
    Lending Partners Available including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep WorkCode 102: https://www.codefellows.org/courses/code-102/intro-to-software-development/ or equivalent
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 201: Foundations of Software Development (Part-Time)

    Apply
    HTML, Design, CSS, Front End, Scrum, MVC, Agile
    In PersonPart Time40 Hours/week8 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$5,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline
    Build a strong software development foundation and learn how to use HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and various libraries to create fully-functional web apps. This course guides students toward developing a well-rounded foundation of skills necessary for modern web development. These skills include HTML, CSS, and JavaScript coding; utilizing Git workflow processes; project organization; designing with wireframing; and employing introductory Agile development methods. Daytime and Nights & Weekend tracks are each 160 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    Deposit500
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelN/A
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 301: Intermediate Software Development (Full-Time)

    Apply
    HTML, Git, jQuery, Design, User Experience Design, CSS, Front End, Scrum, MVC, Agile, REST, SQL
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week4 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$5,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Becoming a well-rounded developer is much more than learning language syntax. In this intensive course, you will study the common core of software development, including MVC architecture, object-oriented and functional programming, and computer science fundamentals such as basic data structures and algorithms. Come learn how to create and launch web apps in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, with the help of third-party APIs and libraries from around the web. Daytime and Nights & Weekend tracks are each 160 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    Deposit500
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate
    Prep WorkCode 201: https://www.codefellows.org/courses/code-201/foundations-of-software-development/ or Equivalent background
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 301: Intermediate Software Development (Part-Time)

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$5,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Becoming a well-rounded developer is much more than learning language syntax. In this intensive course, you will study the common core of software development, including MVC architecture, object-oriented and functional programming, and computer science fundamentals such as basic data structures and algorithms. Come learn how to create and launch web apps in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, with the help of third-party APIs and libraries from around the web. Daytime and Nights & Weekend tracks are each 160 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    Deposit500
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund and Climb
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate
    Prep WorkCode 201 https://www.codefellows.org/courses/code-201/foundations-of-software-development/ or equivalent experience
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in ASP.NET Core

    Apply
    Git, C#, .NET, ASP.NET, Data Structures, Algorithms, Scrum, MVC, Agile
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Learn to write clean, well-tested, advanced C# code using industry standard software engineering patterns and Microsoft's new ASP.NET Core framework. You will use Visual Studio Community Edition to create ASP.NET MVC Core applications and work with Azure to deploy applications onto a live server within the cloud. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts like object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, and the foundations of Microsoft’s ASP.NET Core Framework. Students will progressively build projects from start to finish following industry best practices and standard agile methodology. This course includes a career development curriculum to get you ready for your job search, plus job search assistance after graduation. The Daytime track is 400 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipDiversity Scholarships are available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Prep WorkCode 301 or equivalent: https://www.codefellows.org/courses/code-301/intermediate-software-development/
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Java with SpringMVC & Android

    Apply
    Data Structures, Algorithms, Android, Java, Front End, MVC
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Learn to write clean, crystal-clear, well-tested, advanced Java code using industry-standard software engineering patterns while building servers with SpringMVC and mobile apps with Android. In this course, you will use IntelliJ IDEA and Android Studio to create Java applications. You will deploy the applications onto live servers with Heroku, install your Android applications onto your phone, and have the apps communicate with Firebase, Google's realtime database. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts such as object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, Big O asymptotic analysis, and the structure of statically typed languages. This course includes career development curriculum to get you ready for your job search, plus job search assistance after graduation. The Daytime track is 400 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python

    Apply
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Learn the language used at NASA, Instagram, Dropbox, and other companies large and small – as you build professional-grade apps in Python. Throughout this intensive course, you will study professional software development techniques and practices as you advance your skills in Python. This course includes career development curriculum to get you ready for your job search. The Daytime track is 400 hours total. Course hours include lecture, lab, and coworking.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

     
    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipScholarships Available: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarship-fund/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Ops 101: Explore Cybersecurity

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$99
    Class size50
    LocationOnline, Seattle
    Considering a career in cybersecurity? Start here! In this one-day workshop, you will experience the all-new Code Fellows cybersecurity program, learn how to protect yourself against cybercrime, and explore various cybersecurity career paths.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep WorkNone
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo

Shared Review

  • Kevin Townsend • Ruby Developer • Graduate
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    Having been both a student and a TA at code fellows I can tell you that it's a wonderful atmostphere. The teachers really know what they are talking about and you can always ask someone for help.  Everyone is very patient and always willing to help.  You will learn everything you need to know about being a web developer in any course you take.  From the basics of yoru language, to how the request/response cycle works, to RESTful applications and datastructures and sorting algorithms, you will know how things work when you're done.

    CF will always try to help you out with your studies and your job hunt.  Their space is made available for you, you get a mock interview and some solid help with writing your resume.  At the very worst, you get your money back if you can't find a job, but with only 3% of students unable to find a position, I doubt that will happen.

    As a TA, I tried to continue this tradition by always making myself available to the students.  Generally, I could answer their questions off the top of my head, but if I couldn't I was more than willing to sit down and figure it out with the student.

    It's really difficult to be in bad mood while at CF, if not impossible.  It's less of a school and more of a big family.  It's large enough that you get the benefits of the name, yet small enough that you get to know everyone.

    I might be moving on for now, but I have a sneaking suspission that I'll be back :)

  • Karina  User Photo
    Karina • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Before I decided to take courses at Code Fellows, I read so many reviews about each bootcamp. Finally I chose Code Fellows and I started my first course in August 2019. I just recently graduated with a certificate in ASP.NET Core C# in December 2019. The whole curriculum was very intense yet it was very rewarding. Here is why I love Code Fellows:

    • I love the curriculum! The curriculum includes in-class lectures, labs, code challenges, reading assignments, pair-programming sessions, guest speeches, networking events, and career development sessions.
    • Code Fellows follows industry standards throughout the curriculum and teaches students to do everything with a proper way that aligns with the industry standards. For example, students have lots of opportunities to pair with each other and do group projects together. With that, students at Code Fellows develop better communication skills and teamwork skills to work with others and can better read and understand other people's codes.
    • They have awesome instructors and staffs! I absolutely love the culture at Code Fellows. It is a very welcoming community. Everyone is so friendly and the instructors really care about the students. At Code Fellows, you can ask anybody for help if you have any questions or need anything. All the TAs, instructors, and even campus directors and principals make themselves available for the students if you want to talk or ask for any advice regarding the curriculum, interview preparation, or career development.
    • Code Fellows teaches students how to "learn". Learning is a never-ending thing, especially if you work in the tech industry. Code Fellows not only teaches students how to write codes but also trains us how to think and learn on our own. When I started my first course, I did not know how to read documentations and I did not know how to find a solution on my own. However, throughout the courses, as I learned more and more about coding, I started to develop my problem-solving skills. Therefore, in my last course at Code Fellows, my teammates and I were able to build a mobile app within one week. The point is we did not learn how to build a mobile app in the class, we learned it all by ourselves!
    • Comparing to a CS degree, a bootcamp is relatively shorter and cheaper. However, at Code Fellows, the curriculum teaches you all you need to know as a software developer. Students graduated from here know how to read/write codes, build full web apps (front-end and back-end), debugging, write unit tests to apps, and understand data structures and algorithms. Additionally, since this is an intense program, in order to successfully pass the courses, students develop excellent time management skills, problem-solving skills, communication skills, and become more self-disciplined and self-driven.
    • Last but not least! Throughout the curriculum, every week there is a guest speaker on the campus to talk about numerous topics related to the tech industry. This helps student be familiar with the tech industry and learn something new from the professionals. In the last course of the curriculum, there are career development sessions that help students prepare for job searching after graduated. We review each others' resumes and do mock interviews to practice our public speaking skills. I found this very useful as I received so many feedback from my classmates and the campus director.

    Finally, for the time I was at Code Fellows, I developed a strong bond with my cohort-mates. We studied together, struggled together, and then we found the solution together. We supported each other and we kept each other accountable. I really love the culture at Code Fellows that everyone was friendly and willing to help others.

    If you are considering joining a bootcamp, be prepared that it is not going to be easy. The curriculum was intense and not easy as all. However, at the end everything was worth it. Just keep doing it and never give up, you will eventually get there. Be positive and enjoy the process, it may be hard and you may struggle along the way, but trust yourself, you know more than you think you do!
  • Michael Goseco  User Photo
    Michael Goseco • Technical Analyst • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    I entered Code Fellows with no knowledge or expectations. I was desperately overdue for a career change in order to provide for myself and my family. My last experience with coding education was left far behind - a year of college Computer Science back in 2001. After a long period of self discovery, I finally knew that this was the career that I not only wanted to do, but had to do. It was all or nothing now. College was no longer an option, given tuition being the grotesque beast it is now compared to then. Thankfully, I was in the midst of a dawn where coding boot camps were finally getting the respect and recognition they deserve, even by the biggest names in tech. And I was fortunate enough to have a friend who recommended Code Fellows highly.

    I couldn't be more grateful for the experience I had there. We began by learning the fundamentals of web development, using the latest tools in HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. As we progressed, we learned more about server side development and API integration. It was such a sense of accomplishment the first time learned how to pull down data to tell the weather, or render a google map with search results; all on our own websites built from scratch. In the final, advanced course, I chose to learn ASP.NET Core, which added even greater depth and power to how we developed our web apps. Our instructors and TAs throughout this curriculum were excellent in helping us all understand the material, and we eager to answer any questions we had. I can honestly say I am amazed at the amount of material I learned in my relatively short time there, and to know that it's just the tip of the iceburg.

    I should also mention that during this entire time we were also learning skills to help up break into the industry. Whiteboard questions were almost a daily exercise, with a final one-on-one whiteboard with an instructor being necessary to graduate, and rightfully so. They also brought in guest speakers every week from different fields to share their personal experiences on their work life, where they started, and how they got there. We were taught how best to market ourselves to employers, to network and make connections, to know our worth as developers. I'll never forget how they explained the average time for a graduate to land their first job is 9 months. If you already have a degree of any kind or pervious experince then that time is significantly shorter, as many of my own classmates have proven already. But true to their word, after a great deal of effort, I got my first offer just before Christmas, almost exactly 9 months after graduating.

    I would highly recommend Code Fellows to anyone looking to start a career in programming. I still stay in touch with the community on Slack just to hear the chatter, events, and all the improvements they've made after my time. Not only do you get a degree's worth of technical education, but also the knowledge to prepare you for the job hunt, and give you that edge needed to get that first big offer.

  • Matt Wojciakowski  User Photo
    Matt Wojciakowski • Content Developer, Cloud & AI • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Attending Code Fellows was a game-changer for my career. There are lots of technical training resources out there, but the staff at Code Fellows understands where the rubber meets the road.

    By that, I mean both:
    1) How to meet students, new or seasoned, where they're at in their learning and technical ability; and
    2) Understanding the quickly changing opportunities and needs of the technical industry. 

    My experience at Code Fellows set me up to be 'job-ready' and able to jump into a major tech company with some skills that were both needed, and that my more experienced colleagues had not yet learned, allowing start offering value straight-away as I gradually got up to speed with the specifics of my new job.

    There is a requirement to do some independent (online) learning in order to be admitted to a non-intro Code Fellows course... so there is some natural filtering before classes begin. The actual course-time always seemed well-spent... offering a very high level of challenge, fast pace, and individualized support. Much of the work is collaborative -- another aspect that was very well-suited in preparing me for the jobs I transitioned to. 

    I can't sing my praises loud enough -- Code Fellows was a FANTASTIC experience that changed my life, transitioned me into a new career (after completing graduate school and working for 8.5 years in a completely different industry), and lead me into a new network of friends and colleagues.

  • 201 with Scott
    - 9/18/2019
    Jason Hiskey  User Photo
    Jason Hiskey • Software Developer at Microsoft • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    My 201 experience was amazing at Code Fellows. Scott did an amazing job of taking a group of students with a broad range of technical abilities and forming them into a cohesive unit. He was able to very sucessfully assess all of the different students and individually help them. 

  • Learned a ton
    - 8/8/2019
    Ray  User Photo
    Ray • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    I went through the 201, 301, and 401 Code Fellows courses from Sept 2018 to Feb 2019. 

    My 201 and 301 courses were very well structured, and were taught by two of the best (imo) instructors with industry experience that were there at the time.  The classes and work were long, typical of a coding boot camp style. the student to instructor size was very good (20-30), with each class having an assistant instructor and at least two Teacher Assistants (TAs).

    My main critiques are the job assistance and the Python 401 class.  The Python 401 curriculum seemed less focused with topics from working with data sets in Jupyter Notebooks, DevOps type work with AWS, and Web Development with three different frameworks (Flask and Django, and a day in React) juggling both front and back end topics.  Sure we got exposed to a lot of different types of potential software jobs and technologies, but by the end of it I felt ready for none.  To top it off, our main instructor left with 2 weeks left in the course, which left a pretty bad taste in my mouth.  Between the 9 people in our class, I think only 1 person ended up landing a software developer job, but in Javascript.

    The job assistant part after graduating was also poor in my opinion.  The Director of Customer Relations had left with no replacement at some point while I was there, and all of the mock interviews, mentors, networking events from partnering companies ceased to exist when I left.

    Overall its a great curriculum and the first 2/3 of my experience there was great.  I'd do it again if I had the chance, but would follow the instructors that I had in my 201 and 301.

  • David  User Photo
    David • Software Development Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Code Fellows changed my life following a period of long term unemployment.

    The staff and instructional team are outstanding. Course material is challenging regardless of skill level. It begins with an introduction to basic web technologies -- HTML, CSS, and Javascript. This is followed with an intermediate course that delves into practical skill sets including REST APIs, web frameworks, and design patterns.The experience culminates in a Full Stack Development course. A Student may choose Javascript, Python, Java, and C#. The exposure to modern tools and concepts is extraordinary. Algorithms and Data Structures are emphasized heavily in order to prepare for technical interviews. Students are also exposed to Cloud Infrastructure, Test Driven Development, and even Data Science -- dependent on which course they choose.  There is a balance between lecture and hands-on labs. Students have the opportunity
    to truly explore and develop their own projects.

    Pair programming and team projects are essential to the curiculum -- this is an opportunity to connect with so many extraordinary people. The Student body at Code Fellows comes from all walks of life. Diversity is greatly valued by this school. This school accepts the GI Bill creating a large representation of military veterans. There are a great many inspiring stories learned by coding together.

    The true value in this school is what happens after the course is finished. The struggle for employment is very real. The Career Services staff is highly motivated to help all graduates find permenant positions. Instructors made time for me to assist with interview preparation and additional lecture at no cost. Graduates are allowed to work on campus free of charge -- it is an amazing environment to work in.
    I recieved so much positive encouragement from everyone. I landed a position at Microsoft because of my experiences at Code Fellows.

  • Glen Pham   User Photo
    Glen Pham • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    The junior/entry level job market for developers is EXTREMELY oversaturated. There are 17 coding boot camps in Seattle, each churning out Web Developers by the dozens every month to compete for the few and scarce entry level/junior positions. Sure, anyone can learn to code, but will you be good enough to compete in a highly competitive market? It's far from impossible to find a job afterwards, just be prepared to lower your expectations and raise your technical skills higher as the technical bar has been raised for junior devs. It took me a year to find a job and I had to practice and teach myself to become a mid-level developer. 

    For Codefellows specifically, they will teach you the basics of programming. Instructors are hit or miss, some good, some just mediocre. The curriculum was decent, it builds on top of things you learned previously but a lot of the lectures I didn't find very useful. 

    If I could go back in time I wouldn't have gone through Code Fellows, and would of went the self taught route. There are tons of quality courses online that you can take and learn everything you need. Save your $$$, and teach yourself. 

  • Gregor Richardson  User Photo
    Gregor Richardson • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    The material we covered was modern and relevant, providing a realistic introduction to Javascript development in 2018. It gave me the confidence and hands on exposure to begin seriously understanding coding for the first time in my life. Additionally, the great classmates I met were an unexpected bonus. Many were very serious students coming from a variety of backgrounds and we learned a tremendous amount from each other. I have no doubts we'll be valuable industry contacts for each other in the future. The biggest disappointment I faced was our instructor was a recent bootcamp grad and although the instructor was a nice person and did indeed know much more than us students, there was a very obvious lack of real-world experience and gaps in knowledge that limited the range of context that was provided alongside the material. I still got my money's worth, but I also know students in other cohorts may have received a slightly more nuanced instruction than I did.

  • David F  User Photo
    David F • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I attended code fellows (201, 301, 401 course) and had a positive, memorable experience. My success was in part because I spent a fair amount of time researching the program and if it would be a good fitfor me.

    It is rigorous and intended to challenge students so they are job ready. The school does a solid job of teaching the core principles needed for an entry level role. I can tell you that if software development is a career you are serious about, it requires ongoing learning and dedication in this field of study. Code Fellows can provide you the introductory tools, but its ultimately up to you to ensure that this is continued before, during, and after completion of the coursework.

    I’ve seen some of the negative post here stating that individuals were not ready when leaving the program or able to find employment. This is an investment and if you only take a 201 or 301 level course, be realistic of how much you can learn and practice in such a short amount of time. I still think these courses are a great option because not everyone requires the same level of training. I needed more of the advanced topics covered in the 401 level course.

    I graduated from the program and wasn’t even the strongest developer in my class, but I showed persistence and motivation. If you are transitioning careers, having these qualities will help you find success. Be aware of how important networking is in finding your entry level role and don’t apply at companies that are looking for experienced Developers. 

    Last, but important the faculty are beautiful people. They help create a safe space that fosters a collaborative learning environment. These folks work very hard in helping lead people to happy, rewarding careers. If you are considering code fellows as an option, I encourage you to check out a monthly 101 workshop, ask to attend an open house, or even meet with an alumni to see if a career in software is right for you. Hope this helps some of you peeps out there that are contemplating this decision. It’s within your reach...good luck!

    ** I took a very entry level role as an associate developer and was promoted to Software Engineer in 90 days :)

  • Great experience
    - 3/29/2020
    Laura • Application Development Associate • Graduate
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    I took 201 and 301 at Code Fellows (ie Foundations of and Intermediate Software Development). I did not take a 401 course, and I was able to get an entry level job in the field of application development with a tech consulting firm. The instructors for both courses were engaging, approachable, and encouraging. The environment and Code Fellows overall is *extremely* welcoming, even to people like myself who are inexperienced and new to the tech field. There is awesome diversity (gender, ethnic background, employment background, etc) on campus. When I requested a tutor through the Code Fellows tutoring service, I was able to specifically request a female tutor and they accommodated that request with no issue. 

    There are weekly events on campus with networking opportunities and exposure to lots of different aspects of the field and areas of specialization. Code Fellows also does a great job emphasizing important job search skills like polishing your online presence and they will guide you through creating a better LinkedIn profile. 

    Honestly it was a great experience. As with all things, you get out what you put in. So be prepared to work your ass off. On the first day of 201, you get a super welcoming and friendly intro to the staff and campus. And then the pace and volume of work quickly becomes...frenetic. There's a lot. You can't learn it all. It's hard and at times overwhelming. But the instructors and TAs are amazing and they truly will do everything to help you learn and succeed. 10/10 would go again.
  • Will koger • Student
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    Attending the 102 course has really helped out when I started 201. Our instructor Brad did a really good job of covering a lot of material in a short week. He created a atmosphere that allowed us to more in depth with questions that may not have been "on the curriculum". I think it helped gain a better understanding of the material. You can definitely tell the difference through the first week of 201 on who took the 102 course. Regardless of skill level I would highly recommend it. Even if its just to get use to the systems and interfaces used throughout code fellows. It's been a great springboard in to the rest of the program.
  • Fletcher LaRue • Software developer • Graduate
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    I attended CodeFellows from October 2018 thru March 2019 (5 months), and then spent the following 5 months building my portfolio website, learning in the areas I felt weak in, and looking for a job. In reality I wanted to have a portfolio I was somewhat happy with before applying so I wasn't really applying for the whole 5 months.

    At CodeFellows there are 3 levels, which is nice, because they only bill you at the start of each level (as opposed to the whole lump sum up front), the first 2 levels (201 and 301) are 100% focused on Javascript (no other languages). The 3rd and final level (401) lets you pick which language you want to specialize in (when I attended in 2018/19 the options were: JavaScript, Java, Python, and C#). The last course is the longest and most expensive. I did the JavaScript course, which I would fully recommend. The first two levels (201 and 301) are in Javascript, so switching to a new language part way thru will only prevent you from getting to more complex coding ideas (my personal opinion). Essentially you don't get put back to square 1 in the middle of your learning. I (personal opinion here) think also that JavaScript and the JavaScript curriculum is the most relevant for finding a job for a junior developer. I didn't take the other courses and I don't hire developers so I can't say for sure.

    In the JavaScript track you learn a ton of good stuff. And in my job I have used much of it extensively and repeatedly, and often. It was actually kind-of surprising to me how similar to the "project weeks" the actual job was (Code Fellows project weeks are intense 4-day team projects, where you often have to learn and apply stuff you've never done). My formal job duties are as a front-end software developer, which is why I feel the React portion of the course is most applicable and marketable. It is probably the thing that made me most qualified for the job I have now. React might be the single best thing CodeFellows teaches :). In addition, due to the nature of the JavaScript full stack curriculum, I also feel empowered to tackle backend problems. There is a lot of time spent covering things like APIs (when I was there we made Express servers in Node.js), and in my job I've run across both C# and Java APIs and feel right at home because they look similar to the JavaScript APIs we made in class.

    We also covered:
    - React (the most popular front-end framework out there now)
    - React Native using Expo (i.e. use React code to make apps on your phone), some people even published apps on the app store
    - Web-sockets (i.e. chat-rooms)
    - Authentication (i.e. users can login/logout, and do special things if they're logged in)
    - Databases (our class used MongoDB and PostgreSQL) (i.e. users can store and share data that is saved in the cloud. this is data that lasts through a page refresh)
    - A ton of other stuff. Call them or find the curriculum for the most up to date info - I know they keep evolving as industry trends change.

    I do feel the curriculum was really relevant. This is something that my brother (a pro dev of ~10 years) helped me look at when deciding whether to do a bootcamp, and which bootcamp to do. As part of the vetting process I also met the people, who at CodeFellows are all very nice and supportive --- they do meet-and-greets for prospective students where you can meet current students, alumni, and staff to get a better idea of whether you want to attend and get recommendations -- pretty useful.

    If you DO decide to go thru the program, and I would recommend it, since it has changed my life for the better, there are a few things that can really help you succeed in the class, and if at all possible leading up to the program try to situate yourself so that succeeding is as likely as possible.
    - prior experience coding (however small)
    - "over-achieve" on the prework (khan academy Javascript in particular), try to make challenging goals for yourself once you complete the basic requirements. Try to strive to make something you want to show people! This can make it less of a chore and more of a fun activity. Start this as soon as possible... from this you're pretty much guaranteed to do great at the start of the course.
    - mentorship (even 1-2 hours every month), or someone to call and ask questions to or complain to. Find someone, if you can, who knows programming that you can talk to, even if briefly about random stuff. Ideally they can do code reviews.
    - short commute. The less time your commute is the longer you'll have to sleep, eat, and code. Ideally you will only be doing those 3 things for the whole program!!

    It's not all roses. Going through CodeFellows is not guaranteed to land you a job - your hard work and persistence is what you will need to rely on for that. The program is pretty hard... no single concept is really difficult if enough time is spent on it, but there are new concepts introduced almost every day, and I didn't feel like I had time to master every concept. Do this for 5 months straight and it does take some mental fortitude to get through it. One of the frustrating parts of the course was the grading system. When I went there, it didn't feel like there were enough TAs, so the grading for assignments was often delayed. So I would lose points on some assignment, and then only learned about it later, when my mind is on something else, and/or the grades are getting locked in. When I attended it was a required 90% to pass, but the actual grading was relatively flexible - you could re-submit work that you lost points on to get additional credit (there was a time cut-off for this though, I forget how long, 2 weeks?), and the late-assignment penalty simply reduced the maximum you could get on the assignment, again, I forget how much (80%?), but it wasn't too bad. Often, it felt to me like playing the grade-game was a big distraction from the main objectives of the class - we had ~4 or 5 assignments a day - some were quite trivial like a daily warmup, but others weren't so trivial, like the daily whiteboard problem which takes ~1hr. In the end, I found that (at least for me) the best route was to play the grade-game (i.e, submit assignments even if not-done, play catchup when you can) ONLY as much as needed to get the minimum grade, and not focus on getting 100% .... instead I tried to focus on learning the material. I realized that there was no special award for getting a really good grade, it's just pass fail.

    The daily routine can be difficult. But you get out of it what you put in. And its worth it in the end. I spent a lot of time on this stuff... probably ~12 hours a day (including meals). Class started at 9am and with lecture, lab, other homework, the daily whiteboarding problem, catchup work, etc it is easy to go until 9pm. For me, it helped to keep my meals simple, I had a short commute, and I reduced my social life to as minimal as possible. I would also recommend using a Mac laptop instead of a Windows laptop (disclaimer: I am not a Mac evangelist, I had used Microsoft PCs my entire life) the differences are only slight, and people will tell you that you can program on either, but overall, and if you can spare the extra dough, I think the developer experience is better on a Mac, things just seem to work better and smoother. Also, if you finance a Mac with a Barklays card you can get 18 months w/o any payments, at which time you hopefully have a job - this deal might have changed tho. Also I would recommend dropping ~150-200 bucks and buying a 2nd monitor - compared to the price you're paying for the course per day, a monitor to give you some extra screen real-estate is almost a no-brainer - I didn't get one until part way thru the course and when I did my productivity went way up.

    One thing that I think had some room for improvement was the job support. The people who were there and helped me did a great job, but as an institution, the process could have, I think, been a little better. It could be different now.... when I had just finished the program there had been some staff changes in the job support program. I'm also not sure what they could have done differently though - I just know it could have been better - possibly better integration with local businesses? i.e. more "practice" (but not really practice) interviews with local companies (I did get to do a mock interview with Microsoft). Maybe setting up informational interviews? tours? On-site job fairs?

Code Fellows Outcomes

* These outcomes are not audited by Course Report. In some cases, data is audited by a third party.


100%
Graduation Rate
98%
Employed
$72,500
Median Salary

Of the students who enroll at Code Fellows, 100% graduated. 96% of graduates were job-seeking and 98% of job-seeking graduates found in-field employment after 180 days and report a median income of $72,500. Below is the 180 Day Employment Breakdown for 1096 graduates included in this report:

180 Day Employment Breakdown:

Full Time, In-Field Employee
81.7%
Full-time apprenticeship, internship or contract position
12.1%
Short-term contract, part-time position, freelance
4.0%
Employed out-of-field
5.1%

Notes & Caveats:

Here are are the details on how we track Employment Data