code-fellows-logo

Code Fellows

Portland, Seattle

Code Fellows

Avg Rating:4.2 ( 124 reviews )

Code Fellows offers full-time and part-time software development courses in Seattle, Washington. Since their first cohort in 2013, Code Fellows has taught over 1000 graduates and iterated on their curriculum and format to ensure students receive the most industry-relevant training as effectively and efficiently as possible. Students are immersed in their learning with daily lectures, pair programming, weekly presentations from professionals in the industry, one-week project sprints, and more. Code Fellows graduates work at Microsoft, Zillow, Expedia, XBOX, NIKE, Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, and over 500 other companies.

The modular style of the Code Fellows program allows students to test into the course level that is most appropriate for their current skill level. In addition, the modular class structure allows students to choose the schedule and timing that meets their needs. Developers with some programming experience can test into an intermediate or advanced-level programming course, while novice coders can build their experience from the ground up, starting with an introductory course. Code Fellows also offers courses that run nights and weekends, accommodating for students who are working full-time jobs.

Code Fellows’ 10-week Code 401 course is offered in four specializations: Python, full-stack JavaScript, Java, and.NET. Most students generally choose to pursue one of these Code 401 specializations.

Recent Code Fellows Reviews: Rating 4.2

all (124) reviews for Code Fellows →

Recent Code Fellows News

Read all (35) articles about Code Fellows →
  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript

    Apply
    JavaScript
    In PersonPart Time15 Hours/week1 Week
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$299
    Class size10
    LocationSeattle
    Not sure where or how to start learning JavaScript? Or maybe you’re discouraged by the confusing interfaces, unclear error messages, and unexplained concepts of online coding tutorials. If you’re ready to move past the concepts covered in Code 101 and work with experienced developers who can help guide you through your online learning, join us for Code 102! You’ll blast through Khan Academy's JavaScript tutorials and get a better understanding of the programming ecosystem.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansTuition due at registration.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in ASP.NET Core

    Apply
    C#, .NET, ASP.NET, Data Structures, Algorithms
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn to write clean, well-tested, advanced C# code using industry standard software engineering patterns and Microsoft's new ASP.NET Core framework. You will use Visual Studio 2017 to create ASP.NET MVC Core applications and work with Azure to deploy the applications onto a live server. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts like object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, and the foundations of Microsoft’s ASP.NET Core Framework.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipDiversity Scholarships are available for Code 201, Code 301, and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Java with SpringMVC & Android

    Apply
    Data Structures, Algorithms, Android, Java
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn to write clean, crystal-clear, well-tested, advanced Java code using industry standard software engineering patterns while building servers with SpringMVC and mobile apps with Android. In this course, you will use IntelliJ IDEA and Android Studio to create Java applications. You will deploy the applications onto live servers with Heroku, install your Android applications onto your phone, and have the apps communicate with Firebase, Google's realtime database. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts such as object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, Big O asymptotic analysis, and the structure of statically typed languages.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipDiversity Scholarships are available for Code 201, Code 301, and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python

    Apply
    Django, Data Structures, Algorithms, Python
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn the language used at NASA, Instagram, Dropbox, and other big-data companies as you build professional-grade apps in Python. Throughout this intensive course, you will study professional software development techniques and practices as you advance your skills in Python. This course includes career development curriculum to get you ready for your job search, plus job search assistance after graduation.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

     
    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipSeveral Diversity Scholarships are available for full-time Code 301 and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes

Review Guidelines

  • Only Applicants, Students, and Graduates are permitted to leave reviews on Course Report.
  • Post clear, valuable, and honest information that will be useful and informative to future coding bootcampers. Think about what your bootcamp excelled at and what might have been better.
  • Be nice to others; don't attack others.
  • Use good grammar and check your spelling.
  • Don't post reviews on behalf of other students or impersonate any person, or falsely state or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity.
  • Don't spam or post fake reviews intended to boost or lower ratings.
  • Don't post or link to content that is sexually explicit.
  • Don't post or link to content that is abusive or hateful or threatens or harasses others.
  • Please do not submit duplicate or multiple reviews. These will be deleted. Email moderators to revise a review or click the link in the email you receive when submitting a review.
  • Please note that we reserve the right to review and remove commentary that violates our policies.
You must log in to submit a review.

Click here to log in or sign up and continue.

Hey there! As of 11/1/16 is now Hack Reactor. If you graduated from prior to October 2016, Please leave your review for . Otherwise, please leave your review for Hack Reactor.

Title
Description
Rating
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
School Details
About You

Non-anonymous, verified reviews are always more valuable (and trustworthy) to future bootcampers. Anonymous reviews will be shown to readers last.

You must log in to submit a review.

Click here to log in or sign up and continue.

  • Anonymous
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Right now it seems like the main goal of this company is to make a profit, and not actually turn out top notch programmers. They've split up their classes now, and are making a total of 20k off of students who go through the whole course. Their scholarships are miniscule. The TA's are usually students who finished the course before and don't actually know what they're talking about. Apparently the job gaurantee has gone away, and they didn't bother to notify any of their 401 students. 

    I had a great 201 and 301 experience, but will not be taking the 401 (the course that really matters). The teachers in the 201 and 301 were fantastic, and there were a few TA's (that have since left on to bigger and better things) that were great as well. But for 12k, you expect that to translate into the 401...it doesn't. 

  • to take note of...
    - 1/10/2016
    Anonymous
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    Codefellows broke up their development accelerator, which means you'll have to complete several courses (i.e CF201, CF301 and a 401) before you can specailise in either Javascript, Python or iOS. This also means higher course fees and a longer time out of the market. There was a lot of emphasis on getting you to move on to the next course, which meant it was hard to fail and you might not get honest feedback. In 201, the instructors and TAs were former students with no industry/teaching experience and modifying the syllabus from previous batches. Also, their programs are catered for locals, with international students receiving limited support. 

    If these do not bother you, then CF is a reasonable place to get you where you have to be in terms of web development foundations. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    My experience was with the Python Dev Accelerator out of Seattle. Here are my thoughts.

    Pros:

    • Our instructor Cris was amazingly helpful; he works incredibly hard
    • The average student out of my Dev Accelerator was quite capable and talented; at least for my class, it was relatively high caliber
    • I got lucky and got a job that I really enjoy. I think I'm one of 7 out of 16 with a permanent position six months after starting
    • The curriculum that Cris created was good. It was a nice blend of working with up-to-date libraries while also developing CS fundamentals

    Cons:

    • Codefellows has gotten more expensive (12k for final program now and 20k for the full course; used to be 12k for the full course)
    • The 9 month job guarantee has quietly gone away
    • Each Codefellows Dev Accelerator (it's now called 401) is a one-man-show; single instructor classes despite each class being 100-200k in gross revenue
    • While there is some friendly job support via Gina, it really isn't enough. Many people were struggling to find good skill/career-building activities to pick up afterwards
    • The graduation statistics currently at codefellows.org/student-success-stories (which previously lived at codefellows.org/alumni-stats) haven't been updated properly in about 2 years. Average graduate salaries have gone down and job search times have gone up, and the histograms on this page are exactly the same that were there 2 years ago. As of writing this review they still cherry-pick update this page, which I find dishonest
    • The cost per unit time is on-par with high-profile bootcamps, including Hack Reactor and Galvanize. Those programs might have more comprehensive job and career support
    • Cris is worth whatever money he got. The value that Code Fellows adds is not worth it. Overall the program feels overpriced from a service-value perspective
  • Highly Recommend
    - 12/21/2015
    Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    I've taken two classes with Code Fellows thus far and have really enjoyed both. The learning atmosphere from my classmates to the instructors were always available to assist any time that I had a question. 

    Not only did I learn a lot of new things, I also have the experience of collaboration with other coders working on a project as well as a small portfolio of projects built up for when I go to seek a job.

    This pace of learning is a great choice if you're just looking to get out there and do right away. You can only learn so much by reading in a book, so I really like that Code Fellows focuses on real world applications and practices.

  • J M • Implementation Specialist • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    It covers HTML, CSS, Javascript and using a Javascript Library (jquery). It's pretty quick overall. In theory it sounded great, and it was at night which made it approachable. I'm actually reviewing the previous iteration of this class, that was also a heck of a lot cheaper.

    The class started off pretty strong, but suffered from some serious structural issues going forward. It seemed to be a section of their full-time class that had been stretched over a longer period of time. My professor seemed incredibly intelligent, but in such a crowded class he came across a little overwhelmed. I think the group size (130+ participants) If anyone was to ask questions it felt out of place, there was interaction but always felt forced...like it was really just meant to be a lecture. While I'm certain the professor knew the material very well, he approached the class in a way that almost made him seem like he was the one who didn't do his homework. The whole thing felt a little unprepared.

    Great guy, odd class. I guess it did the job, in the most quick and dirty sort of way but I'm not sure I'd be interested in spending more on something full-time. 

  • iOS Track
    - 12/16/2015
    Miles Ranisavljevic • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    My experience at Code Fellows has been great!  I came into the program with very little programming knowledge or experience, and I will be leaving feeling pretty ready to contribute as a developer wherever I land a job.  I have gotten plenty of help with the job placement, and have been very grateful for the feedback on social media, resumes, etc.

  • Clare • FullStack Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    In a matter of 8 weeks, we covered a full MEAN stack, starting with node.js and Express.js. My teacher was Tyler who focused on teaching us test driven development, and donated a class per week to covering common whiteboarding questions.  In addition to practicing relevant code during the week, Tyler took the time to 'pull back the hood' and explain vairous behind the scene functions that we woudl otherwise not see happening. When we started covering Angular.js and MongoDB again we were developing using TDD, and learning how to build the most efficient stack based on the size of the project. Additionally, we had weekly projects focused on building servers and stacks with a team of 3 to 4 people, designed to build up our GitHub repos and teach us how to work on dev teams. The curriculum was challenging but fair, at times it seems rather rushed due to the time constraints in the class, however the teacher, TAs and staff were readily available when I needed them. There was also a day every week that was focused on career development from designing a resume, answering interview questions and negotiating salary. Overall this was helpful, but seemed a bit excessive for the limited class time we had to learn JavaScript.  

    The curriculum is in the middle of a refactor to make the course 10 weeks instead of 8. I think this is going to make the course even better than it was when I took it, since there is still a lot of material that gets brushed over. After graduating the class, I was able to land a job as a FullStack dev within a month of graduating. I did feel perpared to join a team after taking Code Fellows and have had similar reviews from my manager. 

  • Anonymous • Software Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I had a great experience with Code Fellows. I found the subject matter and the curriculum to be fascinating and more exciting than I had imagined. I graduated from the Full-Stack JavaScript track, and they definitely covered the technologies that employers are currently looking for. 

    I do think the course could have been a little more challenging, and that there could have been more feedback provided as far as code styling/elegance is concerned.  I did graduate before they restructured their program, so perhaps that has changed. I believe it has a longer duration now, which is a huge plus.

    After several months I was able to find employment at a small startup where im abel to work with the full stack and Im loving it. 

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    This is a very thourough, immersive bootcamp style course.
    It is exhausting, but very educational. The environment is very inclusive and the students have very diverse backgrounds. Comfortable environment.
    40 hours a week, plus tons of homework. Two project weeks.

    Be prepared for this class. Do the pre-week and as much self study as you can.

    Not for the weak of heart.

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I started this few months ago and their overall ideas are great but they don't teach new people to programming much. They throw a project at you and expect you to finish it. If you don't have any experience please don't sign up for this its way too much money for nothing. You can learn what they teach you on your own and save thousands. 

  • Monica Davidson • Front End Engineer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Bootcamp for Front End Web Development. Taught HTML5, CSS3, CSS preprocessors, responsive web design/development, JavaScript and jQuery along with overall web design. Excellent course.

  • Connected
    - 11/6/2015
    Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Codefellows surprised me by how well connected into the community they are. The job placement services are really solid.

  • Former IOS Student
    - 11/5/2015
    Tuan Vu • Lead IOS Dev at Start-up • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I came into Code Fellows with zero coding experience other than a few courses with Code Academy (online tutorials) which gave me a small taste of what coding would be like.   Needless to say, I was overwhelmed, even in then-Foundation II course, or the equivelant of the current 201 course.  For me, I never grasped the fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming, which is pretty easy, but I believed was poorly explained in F2.  The pace in both F2 and Dev Accelerator was too fast and many people were totally lost and were concerned with only getting the homework done rather than really understand why things worked they way they did.  Courses were 6 hours a day total for 2 months, which I think should have been longer.  At least 8hrs for 3 months would be ideal.  The instructors and staffs are great people, but like most start-ups, everything was a little scrappy, but the intentions were there.  Which means every class gets better and better.  I spoke with people 2-3 courses ahead of me and their curriculum really paled in comparison to mine.  And talking to people who are in the current courses, my curriculum paled to theirs.  Despite being the 2nd worse performing students in class, I ended up being one of the first to get a job with $90k salary and am currently the Lead iOS Dev.  In contrast, our class superstars had a lot more trouble getting jobs.  There's a lot more that goes into getting a job than just technical skills.  You need grit and good social skills.  You dont' have to be life of the party, but you better not be a lone wolf.  Overall, CF is constantly improving.  One last thing, the resources are there -- from help with resume, connections with start-ups, technical assistance, whatever -- it is all there.  You just have to seek it out.  Too many people think that CF will hold their hands the entire time.  Not the case.  

     

     

  • Larry Scroggins • Jr. Javascript Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Tl;dr. Go here. You'll learn everything you need to know to get an entry-level developer job.

    After many years working in a job I disliked and in an industry where I felt like a fish out of water, I decided to make a change. Through my work I had been exposed to scripting and had put tentative fingers into the javascript mountain, but it wasn't until Code Fellows came along that I felt like I could really change my career. 

    I started out in the foundations classes. They were nice, and in retrospect fairly easy. Then I moved on to the Full Stack Javascript Engineering development accelerator. This was an 8 week intensive program. I lived javascript for those 8 weeks. Full days of learning how to code turned into nights working on homework. We had two group projects to get us working in teams. Our class paired with the UX/UI dev accelerator class to work on one of those projects. It gave a very good look at the dev process from beginning to end. The only thing missing was a project manager, but we worked that out.

    You'll start by learning node. Then you'll learn whatever the hot backend frameworks of the day are. For my group it was Backbone and Angular. I understand that they've since switched to Angular and React. You'll do relatively easy things in the class setting and work on harder things during your projects.

    Staff and instructors were great. The process of finding a job afterward was supplemented by the staff sending out places that they know are looking. I had at least one interview set up because CF sent my resume to a company. You'll have to do the majority of the job search on your own, but there is help available if you need it on your resume or practicing for interviews.

    The only complaint I had about the whole thing was that I didn't find out I was accepted into the accelerator until the week before it started. A bit more advanced notice to get the financing squared away would have been nice. Also, their financing options at the time I went through weren't great, and the program is definitely not cheap.

  • Leonardo • Associate Software Development Engineer at Expedia Inc. • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Code Fellows was a life changer for me. I came out of my Undergraduate with a double major in Philosophy and Comparative Religion from the UW. I pretty much had no professional working prospects, albeit a strong education and ability to think.

    I studied programming after college by myself, but found myself continually becoming stuck without much help. I decided to take a leap of faith and take the Mobile Development Accelerator at Code Fellows.

    The course did not 'hold my hand,' everyday we worked with a new iOS framework. We developed a unique app each week, and practiced the essential concepts in iOS development. We on the top of the curve, as we were the second educational institution to use Swift in an educational setting.

    In terms of general programming they:

    • Gave me a great education in structuring working software
    • A pragmatic working knowledge of data structures
    • Hands-on Q&A sessions with the instructors 1-on-1.
    • The ability to actively engage new prospective students, teaching to cement your own learning.

    The course gave me an environment to help me excel at learning and adapting in a workplace, but the otherside of the coin is as important too, actually getting a job. They had me covered in:

    • Life time support for Coding Interviews, and Resume help.
    • Supporting me the whole process until I got a job.
    • An immediate network as well as lots of opportunities to help me network.

    My only gripe is that I landed a job in the end at Expedia as an Associate Software Developer working in web technology. I chose mobile because I am extremely passionate in learning about hardware and working with mobile devices. However the opportunities that working at a Fortune 500 will open, makes up for the deficit that I'm not working actively in mobile development.

    I know that they are continually improving their courses and their job search support. I know if I go in there looking for a new job that I'll be met with lots of wonderful opportunities and be able to find something both quickly and something I'd love to do.

  • Anonymous • Technical Project Manager • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I graduated from the Python Development Accelerator in the Spring of 2015. The course was fast paced and focused on real world programs and methods. After graduation, I was prepared to enter the work force and knew how to present myself and had the tools to continue my learning and experience on my own time.

    I would and do recommend Code Fellows to my peers quite often with the only caveat having to do with the job market. Seattle is indeed hiring developers like crazy, but the industry is still warming up to graduates of code schools like Code Fellows, IF you don't have technical experience already.

    In my experience, Python graduates have the most difficulty finding good jobs after graduation, not for lack of skill, but just because of how the industry is. Python specific jobs are few and far between, while strong developers who have Python as a tool in their tool kit, are in high demand. One of the main problems that I ran into was, companies that are looking for python devs, are looking more for backend devs that know C, C++, C#, Java, and Python is a plus. If they are looking for purely a python dev, they rarely have the bandwidth to absorb a junior dev. Having said that, the jobs do exist, they are just hard to find, and are often a sluggish process as experienced devs are put on the front of the queue.

    JS specific jobs, on the other hand,  seem to be more common and can absorb less experienced developers. If someone asks me for advise on what class to take, I answer differently depending on the person. If you have little to no technical experience and no CS degree, like I had, the JS class might be a better way to get into the industry. If you are already a developer, have technical experience, or a CS degree.. Python could be a good fit. 

    I also can't leave a review or tell people about Code Fellows without mentioning the Python instructor Cris Ewing. The guy is amazing. He loves the industry, programming, python, and teaching. He pours his heart and soul into his students and will do everything he can to help you understand the material, IF you are hungry for it. Cris is excelent at what he does, and is a very busy person. If you are willing to put the hard work, effort, and time it takes to absorb the information, he will always have more for you to learn. If you just sit back and expect to be spoon fed.. You will get just as much as you put in. 

    The last bit of advise I give people is be patient with the job hunt. Sometimes it takes a while. I am not really sure where they get the statistics on job placement, but in my course, they aren't really that close to reality. I think with the JS courses, the placement statistics are pretty spot on. In my class, only a couple people out of the 12 person class had jobs in the first two months, and right now, at the 9 months mark, I know of at least two people that still don't have jobs, but are good developers. It just takes a while to find a job sometimes. I had right around 40 interviews before landing my job, which from the first contact, to my first day on the job, was 15 weeks. And that was without any "give us a couple months and we'll get back to you" which is something I heard a lot. The process just takes a while.

    So if you are doing a complete career change, get a CS degree. If you can't, or don't want to, take the JS course, or be prepared for a long job hunt. But having said that... I don't have a degree, but have a 'just out of college' level job, about 2 years before I would have if I did the traditional school route. So I still count it as a win!

     

  • Andrew Nelson • Application Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I'm a software developer with thirty-odd years experience, from x86 assembler right on the silicon up through C and C++, to SQL stored procedures and SOAP Web services. But learning JavaScript full-stack dev was like hacking through a swampy jungle - there are a LOT of opinions out there, and like anything else, half of them are below average.

    Where CF really added value for me was their deep experience with what hiring managers are actually hiring for.  After 8 weeks in the Mongo/Express/Angular/Node stack, I was ready for interviews, and in fact accepted a job offer during the last week of class.

    There was a little bit of instability in the TA staffing, as both our TAs got jobs during the course (is that a bug, or a feature?), but the curriculum was solid and the instructor was outstanding - knowledgeable, articulate, and pretty funny, which doesn't hurt.

    Would definitely take another CF course.

  • Anonymous • Software Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    This class was seriously awesome. It was 8 weeks and covered a multitude of topics. Two of these weeks are dedicated to projects.  I actually got a job offer in the seventh week. They literally do everything they can to get you employable. You just have to put your effort forth. You get what you put in to it.  If you don't put much into it you will just see it as a waste of money.  They have a fairly structured program. You have 3 hours of lecture every day M-W and following that 3 hours of lab. On thursday you go over data structures and algorithms. This is essential to getting a job. Even though code fellows acknowledges that making a canidate do a whiteboarding test at job interview is not the best way at evaulating their skills they teach it to you because its just the way the job industry is. On Fridays they teach you about the strategic ways you should be applying for a job. It was super benefical because they help you form your resume, personal brand and linkedin. Their staff is very helpful and encouraging. The lectures help you understand the topics and you do homework and projects to nail in the concepts. The structure of the program is the key to making you employable. If it was just 8 straight weeks of lectures it wouldnt be the great program it is. The curriculum is dynamic and based off of what gets you a job. It is modern stuff and they dont teach you anything that wont help you get a job. During my interview I was able to answer all the question they asked becuase of what I learned. It so crazy that 2 months of learning can get you so far. This program is really a dream come true. If you want to work hard and change fields it can be right for you. 

  • Kevin Townsend • Ruby Developer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Having been both a student and a TA at code fellows I can tell you that it's a wonderful atmostphere. The teachers really know what they are talking about and you can always ask someone for help.  Everyone is very patient and always willing to help.  You will learn everything you need to know about being a web developer in any course you take.  From the basics of yoru language, to how the request/response cycle works, to RESTful applications and datastructures and sorting algorithms, you will know how things work when you're done.

    CF will always try to help you out with your studies and your job hunt.  Their space is made available for you, you get a mock interview and some solid help with writing your resume.  At the very worst, you get your money back if you can't find a job, but with only 3% of students unable to find a position, I doubt that will happen.

    As a TA, I tried to continue this tradition by always making myself available to the students.  Generally, I could answer their questions off the top of my head, but if I couldn't I was more than willing to sit down and figure it out with the student.

    It's really difficult to be in bad mood while at CF, if not impossible.  It's less of a school and more of a big family.  It's large enough that you get the benefits of the name, yet small enough that you get to know everyone.

    I might be moving on for now, but I have a sneaking suspission that I'll be back :)

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    Hello, This is my expriance with Code fellows Foundation II: Front-End Design & Development

    Instructors:

    CF have the best instructors, they will do everything to make sure you have the best understating of any information they teach. Feedback on homework was minimal, but they were always available if I or any of the course participants needed help.

    The course:
    The course itself on the other hand was a disappointment. I had some coding experience before from self-study and the help of teamtreehouse.com, so I skipped Foundation 1. 

    The class was almost identical to Foundation 1, they even had a better intro to JS. What differentiate the course from foundation 1 was the advanced CSS part. Sadly we skipped half of it "SCSS Part" because we spent. Part of it become we spent a big chunk of time ( almost 30%+ of the course) On Git because half of the class didn't take the "mandatory" Git workshop before the class started. the other reason is because course curriculum was not planned out to fit the course time.

    The course had many faults and I think CF realized that. couple of month after graduation CF were offering a SASS/SCSS workshop (we were giving a discount, but I think we should have got it for free) and at the time I am writing this review the course disappeared from CF website (looks like no longer offered).

  • Andre Gonzalvo • Field Engineer • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    Taking the Foundations I course was an eye opener for me.  I was already working as a QA Test Engineer for a small tech startup but lacked the knowledge in Javascript and other programming language.  Code Fellows bridged this gap and gave me the knowledge and skill to be able to do my job better.  They gave me the resources to be able to help myself in finding out the information I need to be able to find the answer that I needed.  All in All the class was well worth the cost. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    I feel so much more confident in my web development skills now that I have gone through the Computer Science & Web Development Bootcamp. It differs from the F1 night class in that it is more intense and more in-depth. For the majority of us, it didn't prepare us technically to go straight into a development accelerator from the bootcamp, but I feel like it did prepare us for what the experience would be like -- the long days filled with assignments, pair programming and the final project.

    The curriculum is great, but a lot of it goes by so quickly, you'll need to spend time digesting it further after you graduate. They say the class is like work, but sometimes I would have preferred a bit more instruction. Overall, though it wasn't perfect, it was a great experience. Not for everyone, but for those who really want to be immersed in web development and build up a solid base of knowledge.

    I rated the job assistance a 1 because it doesn't come with this class. Although, you are added to the alumni channel where jobs are sometimes posted.

  • Anonymous
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    I recently completed the Computer Science and Web Development Bootcamp offered by Code Fellows at their Seattle Campus. Our instructor was Sam Hamm, who has lots of previous teaching experience (in music) before becoming a Code Fellows instructor.  Frequently instructors fall in one of two camps. Some are obviously brilliant and know the content, but are awful at teaching.  Some are good teachers, but you can tell they're barely a chapter ahead of the students in the textbook.  Sam is a great teacher who also knows his stuff pretty well.

    The course is advertised as fast-paced and intensive, which is basically true.  But it's not really that challenging.  If you complete the pre-work and come prepared you shouldn't have any problem.  Of course, the bootcamp is designed to take someone with no previous coding experience and introduce them to the basics of javascript and web design.  We had a pretty broad spectrum of expereience levels in our class, from people with degrees in informatics to people who haven't done any coding before whatsoever.  Coming in with a little experience helps. I think having done a little bit of Python and C++ in my past let me catch on a little quicker.

    I learned a ton, however.  I basically went from knowing very basic HTML, heard of CSS, and never really touching Javascript before, to being able to put together almost professional-level interactive web pages.  This class doesn't teach any back-end.  Everything that you learn is front-end. So it's not the whole picture but nor is it designed to be.  It's a great introduction to web development, learning how to use git and github, javascript, html, and css fundamentals, and learning how to do some basic web server setup using Node and express.

    I'm giving one star in Job Assistance because this class isn't designed to get you ready to be a full developer.  The Code Fellows way is to eventually take one of their Development Accelerators (DA), after which they guarantee a job or your money back. I haven't taken a DA so I can't speak to how well their job assistance is after one.

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Three levels of classrooms and labs near the Amazon campus in South Lake Union, Seattle, Washington.   It was a hard class but the instruction was great and so was the support and help from teachers, ta's and students as well.  Lecture in the morning, lab in the afternoon.  Reading or tutorials at home each night.  I think immediate level of understanding varies according to your experience previously, but they really want you to succeed and they will help you as long as you help yourself.  The experience was invaluable to me.  I have a lot to learn btu I know I can get there with Code Fellows.