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Code Fellows

Portland, Seattle

Code Fellows

Avg Rating:4.16 ( 118 reviews )

Code Fellows offers full-time and part-time software development courses in Seattle, Washington. Since their first cohort in 2013, Code Fellows has taught over 1000 graduates and iterated on their curriculum and format to ensure students receive the most industry-relevant training as effectively and efficiently as possible. Students are immersed in their learning with daily lectures, pair programming, weekly presentations from professionals in the industry, one-week project sprints, and more. Code Fellows graduates work at Microsoft, Zillow, Expedia, XBOX, NIKE, Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, and over 500 other companies.

The modular style of the Code Fellows program allows students to test into the course level that is most appropriate for their current skill level. In addition, the modular class structure allows students to choose the schedule and timing that meets their needs. Developers with some programming experience can test into an intermediate or advanced-level programming course, while novice coders can build their experience from the ground up, starting with an introductory course. Code Fellows also offers courses that run nights and weekends, accommodating for students who are working full-time jobs.

Code Fellows’ 10-week Code 401 course is offered in four specializations: Python, full-stack JavaScript, Java, and.NET. Most students generally choose to pursue one of these Code 401 specializations.

Recent Code Fellows Reviews: Rating 4.16

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  • Code 102: Intro to JavaScript

    Apply
    JavaScript
    In PersonPart Time15 Hours/week1 Week
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$299
    Class size10
    LocationSeattle
    Not sure where or how to start learning JavaScript? Or maybe you’re discouraged by the confusing interfaces, unclear error messages, and unexplained concepts of online coding tutorials. If you’re ready to move past the concepts covered in Code 101 and work with experienced developers who can help guide you through your online learning, join us for Code 102! You’ll blast through Khan Academy's JavaScript tutorials and get a better understanding of the programming ecosystem.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Tuition PlansTuition due at registration.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in ASP.NET Core

    Apply
    C#, .NET, ASP.NET, Data Structures, Algorithms
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn to write clean, well-tested, advanced C# code using industry standard software engineering patterns and Microsoft's new ASP.NET Core framework. You will use Visual Studio 2017 to create ASP.NET MVC Core applications and work with Azure to deploy the applications onto a live server. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts like object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, and the foundations of Microsoft’s ASP.NET Core Framework.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipDiversity Scholarships are available for Code 201, Code 301, and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Java with SpringMVC & Android

    Apply
    Data Structures, Algorithms, Android, Java
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn to write clean, crystal-clear, well-tested, advanced Java code using industry standard software engineering patterns while building servers with SpringMVC and mobile apps with Android. In this course, you will use IntelliJ IDEA and Android Studio to create Java applications. You will deploy the applications onto live servers with Heroku, install your Android applications onto your phone, and have the apps communicate with Firebase, Google's realtime database. The course focuses on fundamental computer science concepts such as object-oriented programming, advanced data structures and algorithms, Big O asymptotic analysis, and the structure of statically typed languages.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipDiversity Scholarships are available for Code 201, Code 301, and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Code 401: Advanced Software Development in Python

    Apply
    Python, Django, Data Structures, Algorithms
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week10 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$12,000
    Class size30
    LocationSeattle
    Learn the language used at NASA, Instagram, Dropbox, and other big-data companies as you build professional-grade apps in Python. Throughout this intensive course, you will study professional software development techniques and practices as you advance your skills in Python. This course includes career development curriculum to get you ready for your job search, plus job search assistance after graduation.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Climb Credit.

     
    Tuition PlansTuition due by the first day of the course.
    ScholarshipSeveral Diversity Scholarships are available for full-time Code 301 and Code 401 courses: https://www.codefellows.org/scholarships-and-financing/
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelIntermediate to Advanced
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes

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  • Don • Full Stack Web Developer • Graduate
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    I received a fantastic job offer less than a month after graduating from the JavaScript 401 in Portland. After my first week at the job, I proved myself competent and widely productive as I hit the ground running. Most of everything was attributed to the invaluable skills and best practices learned from Code Fellows’ classes.

    I jumped right into the company’s Git workflow, no problem. I have also impressed more than a few of my coworkers here (who have taken classes from other code schools) with concise and functional programming skills I acquired from the 301 course. Learning the Angular.js framework in 401 was challenging. However, when I was prompted to learn the Meteor framework for this job, I was very quick to learn it- as most concepts translate in component-based architecture.

    All in all, Code Fellows didn’t teach me everything I need to know about web development- but instead gave me the tools, the skills, and the confidence to tackle any future obstacles and technologies that come my way.

  • Ed • Graduate
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    I took the iOS Development Accelerator as it was called before the curriculum was changed to a different format. I completed the course at the end of September 2015 in good standing. I am still unemployed, and have had very few people look my way for interviews. I've had a couple of phone interviews, and not one in person interview. 

    I bought into the promise of "you can start from nearly no understanding of software development and become an attractive candidate for jobs within 2 months." Hoooo boy, let me tell you, that's just not how it works. I really wish it did. Maybe it does for front end web dev stuff, but not for actual app development like iOS. A two or three month course is not going to prepare you for that kind of work. I didn't want to believe it either. I thought I was different, that I could make it. Nope. Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but that's the truth. Very few companies will look your way. Why would they? There's so much established talent in Seattle, not to mention they have the resources to recruit candidates from around the country and in some cases from around the world.

    If you want to do software development, I would highly recommend getting an actual CS degree. That's what I wish I would have done. You realllllly need to know in depth the way to think like a programmer, which these courses can't do for you. Not in that timeframe. Trust me. You will learn specific programming paradigms and frameworks specific to whatever you are studying, but not the deeper concepts that really need to be the foundations of that other stuff. 

    Our instructor was an iOS god, and even with that there was just no way to teach career changers how to be a developer companies want to hire. The only people from my cohort who got jobs were those who were switching stacks - they already knew how to write software and had worked for years in the industry. 

    I didn't really get any help applying for jobs besides a resume review and tips on how to prep your LinkedIn page. That's stuff you can find out how to do by googling around for 5 minutes.

    I haven't taken a job since I "graduated" to spend most of my time working on becoming a better developer and applying for jobs. Still unemployed. I'm lucky, I have the luxury to do that, but I feel bad for people who can't. Lots of my peers had to go back to what they were doing before to pay the bills.

    Please, take some time to think about doing a program like this. This isn't some magic pill, no matter what people say. I don't want people wasting time and money like I did; it set me back a lot. I also don't want to dissuade anyone from following their dreams, I'm just telling you that if your dream is to be a software developer like mine is, this is not the way to do it. Consider it a favor, take care and good luck.

    If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at the email address below (no spaces):

    e d r e a s e @ gmail . com

     

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Friday, Oct 14 2016
    Hi Ed,

    Thank you for your candid feedback on this course—we take our student feedback very seriously and use it to tailor our program so our students can be better equipped in their career.

    We absolutely agree that there isn’t a magic pill, and any program to learn to code is going to take a lot of hard work (whether at a four-year university or an immersive program like ours).

    As a graduate of Code Fellows, you’re a part of our community and we want to continue to support you in your goals. We’ve continued to improve our program since we started, and if you feel like the education you received in this course wasn’t equivalent to the money you paid or the effort you put in, we’d like to make it right.

    I’ve reached out to the email you provided so we can come up with a solution to help you feel prepared for and supported in your career.

    Thanks,
    Brook Riggio, VP of Education
    On Behalf of the Code Fellows team
  • Rachael Helsel • Student
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    Just really happy to be studying and learning here at CodeFellows - haven't been here for very long, but I already feel welcomed, included, and safe. The sense of community is really strong, the standards are high, and all of the staff is incredible supportive and encouraging.

    I'm currently in 301, and Rick is a really great teacher - he asks you the right questions to help you discover the answer on your own, and encourages you to "break things" as a way to move past where you are stuck. He also sends out links that are super helpful for extra practice (and credit!) with jQuery and javascript. And even though it's been a week of a ton of information to take in, the format of morning lab/standups/lecture/pair-programming has been really helpful in the area of retention.

    In 201, Brian and Craig were awesome! Brain is a really amazing teacher - his pace, his intuition for where the class was tracking/not tracking with concepts, his consistent review, and overall knowledge/organization were always on point. It's an intense pace, and a lot to take in, but the teachers are really in tune with where the class (and individual) need more support/review.

    My experience here at Codefellows has been super positive, engaging, and beneficial.

  • Don't do it!
    - 9/20/2016
    Matthew • Graduate
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    Don't believe self-reported, manipulated job placement statistics published by a for-profit "educational" company.

    I took three courses from Code Fellows in 2015, the last of which was an iOS "dev accelerator" (they have since changed their course names) which came with a "money back job guarantee" for a $60,000 a year dev job within 9 months of graduation. Only about 30% of our graduating class have gotten dev jobs. Those who had professional programming experience prior to attending Code Fellows got jobs. No one else did. Don't believe anything these people tell you, and certainly don't buy the hype. Worse than spending $10-20k on tuition, you'll end up wasting a year of your life like most of us did. And in spite of having a "money back guarantee" on the tuition if you don't find a job, they very cunningly found numerous ways to "disqualify" the majority of the students who didn't find jobs from actually ever getting a refund of any sort! Don't trust these people. I deeply regret that I ever did.

    Remember, in life, if sounds too good to be true, it probably is. This was a perfect example of that. I deeply regret my decision to attend Code Fellows. I would definitely not do it again.

    Their "job placement assistance" consists of someone who reviews your resume for layout issues and typographical errors and sends you a weekly "let me google that for you" list of job ads found elsewhere on the Internet. Their "hiring partners" are companies they manage to rope into attend a meet and greet for students where representatives from companies will try to engage in polite conversations with noobs and career changers, explaining that they're really just looking for experienced devs (i.e. programmers with years--I repeat, YEARS--of experience).

    Code Fellows instructors will also repeat various mantras in an attempt to lull you into a false sense of confidence. "How can anyone learn to code in less than a year of coursework?" you'll ask. They'll explain correctly that no one can possibly become an expert programmer in that short amount of time, but that doesn't matter, because what Code Fellows will do for you is get you an entry level job... some sort of "apprenticeship" where "you'll get paid to continue learning!" BS. Total BS. Start ups can't afford to hire someone who doesn't know what there doing and large companies most likely take a chance on you.

    You'll end up paying a ton of money for someone to read PowerPoint slides to you and let you use their space to work on your own laptop. Many of Code Fellows' instructors are recent Code Fellows graduates with little or no actual full-time tech industry experience.

    I was simply too naive. I even had friends who are experienced developers or grad students in computer science programs at schools like UC Berkeley try to dissuade me from attending any "code school". When I asked them what they thought of the whole code school trend they responded with one of two answers:

    1) "They [any code school] will be glad to take your money."

    or

    2) "What the hell is a code school?"

    Worse than wasting your money on a code school, you will waste a ton of time. You'd be better off investing that time and money in a traditional computer science degree. That's all these company want anyhow.

    You may think you need a bullshit certificate on your resume to help you land a job. Trust me, graduating with a "Code Fellows" certificate will end up being more of an embarrassment and red flag for employers than an asset. Just don't do it. And if you don't believe me, read on:

    http://www.salon.com/2016/09/17/hacker-house-blues-my-life-with-12-programmers-2-rooms-and-one-21st-century-dream/

    https://www.wired.com/2016/01/in-2016-the-coding-bootcamp-bubble-is-bound-to-burst/

    http://fusion.net/story/303385/coding-bootcamps/

    Don't do it. Learn from our mistakes. Do anything else, including just teaching yourself or taking community college courses on the side. But whatever you do, DON'T QUIT YOUR DAY JOB AND ATTEND A CODE SCHOOL. I wish I could have that time and money back.

    Don't do it!

  • Student
    - 9/1/2016
    Tracey • Student
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    I like that Code Fellows teaches the foundations of what we need to know to be successful, we start with the basics and build upon it. Job support so far seems stellar, helping students prepare resumes and Linkedin profiles, as well as giving resources to make the job search successful. There is a lot of support and help from instructors and TAs, great staff, and a great learning environment that really empowers students to be successful. The stress and lack of sleep has totally been worth the skills I have gained from this program.

  • Clare • FullStack Engineer • Graduate
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    My experience with Code Fellows was challenging, fun, intellectual, and life changing. Coming from a science background, I was expecting to be challenged, but not nearly as much as I was at Code Fellows. The staff (I had Tyler and Duncan as teachers) and TAs were extremely welcoming and talented, and class sizes were capped under 30 which helped keep individuals at the focus of the curriculum. Code Fellows teaches the most cutting edge programming languages and techniques, as well as focuses on resume build and passing technical questions, helping prepare their students for graduating into the "real world." Following graduation, they offer assistance in finding a position, however the job placement is a much more self-directed process. None-the-less, I was able to get interviews even before graduating, and had 5+ offers within two months of completing the program.

    One of the most challenging aspects of Code Fellows was learning how to learn, rather than learning all the ins and outs. There simply is not enough time in the Code Fellows courses to leave with a technical depth that rivals Computer Science 4 year graduates. However, Code Fellows does a great job of bridging this gap by focusing on teaching how to make students resourceful through coding challenges that require building on the skills that are taught in class. This is one place in particular that Code Fellows did a great job of offering enough office hours as well as enough teaching staff to steer students in the right direction while not giving them the answers. Additionally, each week, students participate in one larger project with a group of peers to simulate the dynamics of working on a tech team. Of all the teachings at Code Fellows, learning how to be resourceful for myself has been the most beneficial.

    Since graduating Code Fellows, I joined a start up of 6 people, and after 6 months, our startup was invited to be part of Y Combinator's Summer 2016 batch. My skills were put to the test since the day I started. A lot of the "basics" for my position were ingrained by Code Fellows - Angular, node.js, testing. However, I have also been given larger responsibilities as a result of the ingenuity and adaptability that I was taught at Code Fellows.

    Code Fellows offers a great launchpad into a tech career, you just need to be willing to put in the work, and motivated to succeed.

  • Brandon Parker • Teacher's Assistant • Graduate
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    My experience with Code Fellows started with the one day 101 course in October of 2015. Since that first day, I decided to continue and dive into the rest of what Code Fellows had to offer for me to learn. What started as a genuine curiosity, when I first started, quickly became a really fun and exciting new career option for me. I really have enjoyed seeing the progress I have made from the beginning of the courses from knowing nothing about coding, to now TAing the 401 JavaScript and searching for a career in this field.

    The teachers and all of the staff of Code Fellows have made a huge impact in my 9 or so months that I have spent here and it's been wonderful. Everything from helping me with simple CSS issues to rewriting my resume and preparing for interviews. It's been a blast here and I have enjoyed it very much.

  • Joshua Ho • Graduate
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    Great experience! Thoughtful backend development curriculum and very knowledgeable staff. I would recommend the course to anybody looking for work in JavaScript development.
  • Branton Boehm • Senior Mobile Software Developer • Student
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    After 13 years at a big tech company, working on variations of the same thing over and over, I decided it was time for a drastic change. I spent ten weeks at Code Fellows learning about iOS development and had multiple job offers in hand 2-3 weeks after finishing. I even ended up getting about a 20% raise over what I walked away from.

    The program isn't magical. You can't expect to pay your money, punch the clock, and get handed a cushy job making booku bucks on your way out the door. It takes a passion and decication to learn. Beginners will have a more difficult time than experienced developers, but the program definitely works for both audiences. The more effort you put into it, the more benefit you'll get out of it.

    The professional development was something I didn't think I needed but ended up being a huge help. I learned my interviewing weaknesses and felt so much more confident in interviews after addressing them. I also learned how to use the web to find jobs, as this was the first time I'd looked since college when the companies came to campus to recruit. I'd vastly underestimated how useful this component of the course would be.

    Code Fellows as an organization highly values feedback and takes it very seriously. I've seen changes introduced as a result of feedback both during my course and in the course that followed it.

    In the end, going to Code Fellows was an excellent choice for me and I'm extremely happy with how it all worked out.

     

     

  • A career changer
    - 5/24/2016
    Whitney • Web Developer • Graduate
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    Two of the greatest parts of Code Fellows above other bootcamps around are 1. the ability to test into a level and 2. scholarships! I highly recommend giving coding a try before looking into making a career change through a bootcamp because it's not for everyone. But if you love it, then go for it! Code Fellows in Portland was awesome because of the small class sizes, amazing teachers, and wonderful support staff.

    The curriculum revolves around the most in-demand technologies, and tries to give you good source materials to learn about a broad range of fundamentals. If you blow off the readings, you lose a bit portion of learning. It's really up to you how much you take away from the courses, because instructors are always willing to send you more materials.

    After graduating from 401, the campus director, Jordana, was an invaluable resource in the job hunt. She was there to answer all my questions and help me get my resume out to the Portland community. Having the support of people who really know the tech community is great, but be prepared to put in a lot of work. It's no different than searching for any other desirable full-time positions!

  • Anonymous • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    I took three courses at Code Fellows Portland (201-401) and I enjoyed all three of them. Before the bootcamp, I didn't know how to use terminal. After the bootcamp, I got a great job at one of my dream companies.

    Instructors and TAs: One of the nicest and knowledgable people that I know. Of course once in a while they may have to look up the answers to some of your questions. However, given that programming technology changes every single day, I find that understandable. They did their best to fully answer my questions and made sure I understand. They also went extra miles outside of the class room to help me with the class materials. 

    Environment and classmates: Everyone was friendly and overall, it's a very cooperative environment. Unlike back in university when my grade was determined on a curve and everyone had to compete to get the highest score compared to others, everyone here shared their solutions, discussed about new tools, and wasn't hesitate to help each other. I learned a lot of useful tools and coding styles from my classmates, and also learned a lot from explaining concepts and codes to them.

    Job assistance: I got useful job searching and networking tips from them. They helped me tailor my resume, sent me job leads every week and introduced me to companies for informational interviews. Overall, I believe they did their best to find a job. However, you should be the one who actively seeks out opportunities, connections and job leads. 

    So far everything about Code Fellows has been great. However, it's not a magical place where everyone will graduate and be successful. You have to go the extra miles yourself to learn, since this is a bootcamp. Instructors are there to help you absorb as much knowledge as possible. You should try to read all of the readings before a class start and write down your questions. Then try to find the answers to the questions during the lecture, and ask instructors if you still can't find an answer. If you don't understand what a piece of code is doing, ask your classmates and instructors. So at the end of the day, you would know what every single line of code is doing. Also, google the parts of the readings that you don't understand. You need to understand that you have limited time to master many skills and you need to work hard for it. You could be taught by a Nobel winner and still be right where you were before if you didn't try the best to make the most out of it.

  • Greg • Student
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    One of the things I realized when reading some of the other reviews is that what Code Bootcamp you pick isn't only about the content they teach you. There definitely is a culture fit to consider. All the instructors I've had so far (I'm currently in the 401 Full Stack JavaScript development course) have been very knowledgeable, but love to have fun. So, we were taught a lot, and pushed to learn, but lecture overall had a light atmosphere. If you like that, then great, if you want a more intense feeling, it may not be for you. Just to be clear though, the content of the courses are robust.

    The 201 course was a great base for me for learning web development. The overall approach is to teach you fundamentals before they give you tools to increase your efficiency as a developer. To give you an example of what we were able to accomplish when I was done with the course, look here. That was my final group project.

    The biggest strength of the course is the constant team work environment. You use pair programming, and your final project is a group project. This forces you to learn more than just how to code, but how to talk about code and work with other developers.

    I learned a lot in 4 weeks, and am very happy that I went through the course. To see how far I came in the 4 weeks, compare the group final project with my first assignment in the course, here.

  • Willie Richardson • Spanish Tutor and Event Coordinator • Graduate
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    I also was a Code Fellows student in their 201 and 301 classes.  I struggled in both classes due to an inability to absorb so much information in such a short time.  However, Code Fellows understood my situation and has given me the option to retake both classes at no cost.  They also provided me with a learning plan at the end of my 301 class. I am still pondering on whether this vocation is for me, but I appreciated the empathetic approach that Code Fellows demonstrated towards me.

    The only advice I would give is to perhaps toughen their entrance standards for their 201 class and also require more prep work before starting the 201 course, as this class felt overwhelming almost from day one.

     

  • Why So Expensive?
    - 3/18/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    I've completed the 201 and 301 courses and if I did it over again I would have chosen somewhere else.

    Code Fellows is the most expensive bootcamp out there - at least for Portland and Seattle.  $20K for the 201, 301, and 401 classes which is far more than Dev bootcamp, Coder Camps, or any other bootcamp out there in Seattle.  In fact, 5-8k more! There is no reason for this cost.  Programming languages are programming languages and there are plenty of bootcamps out there who get you to work far faster and for MUCH cheaper.  The results do not justify the costs.  Also, their job placement rates are no better than any other bootcamp.  

    Personally, there is a lot of room out there for Code Fellows and any other bootcamp to fudge their placement rate numbers.  Keep in mind that the attrition rates of their classes are not included in these numbers.  There are A LOT of students in Code Fellows classes who do not make it through their classes.  I recently heard that 40-50% of their students did not make it through a recent Seattle 201 class.  Not sure what Code Fellows is planning on doing about that.  Currently, the only prep work for their 201 course they put you through are a couple classes through Code Academy, which isn't enough.  Unlike universities, bootcamps do not go through an accreditation process and thus are never audited.

    The only bootcamp that actually publicizes their numbers and has them actually audited is Flat Iron school in New York.  Again, why? Do these bootcamps have something to hide?

    Finally, keep in mind that Code Fellows gives next to no job support unless you go through one of their 401 classes.  Why their 301 class is $1000 more than their 201 class is beyond me.  It is the same time duration and you use the exact same textbooks that you purchased for their 201 classes. So after you spend $8000, you are pretty much on your own to find any work with your intermediate coding skills.

    You can go to a similar bootcamp and receive the foundational and intermediate aspects of programming for quite a lot less.  Code Fellows may reply to my criticism by saying they care more or do a better job.  Prove it.

     Good luck.

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Thursday, Apr 07 2016
    Thanks for your review! WE CARE MORE AND DO A BETTER JOB!!!!! 😜 

    But in all seriousness, thanks for your honest feedback. We're sorry that your experience didn't live up to what you were expecting. If you feel you didn't get the value that you paid for, please get in touch with us so we can make it right (http://www.codefellows.org/contact).

    We love seeing students get great software jobs that change their lives. Our Code 201 - Code 401 curriculum is built for this purpose. 

    The modular structure of our classes provides students a way to take the shortest possible path that works for them. For those with programming experience, this means testing into Code 401. We created Code 201 after hearing from many students who are starting from scratch and prefer in-person classes to unguided self-study or 150 hours of assigned pre-work.

    Because Software Development is more than just knowing a programming language, Code 301 advances students' skill sets in application architecture, team collaboration, and industry best practices in front-end web development. We’ve seen and experienced how hard these skills are to pick up in independent learning. 

    Our recent cohorts have roughly an 80% passing rate, and we're working on collecting and publishing more data on student results soon (see our current alumni stats here: http://www.codefellows.org/student-success-stories).

    Career changes like this are a big step and require a significant time investment, so our student support extends beyond the in-class time. Code 401 is where we have the time and space to really explore professional workflows and modern stack-specific standards. Grads are ready for entry-level Software Developer roles, and we provide the ongoing resume review, interview training, code challenge practice, networking skills, and curated job leads, and supportive community needed to land and excel in a new career. 

    Thanks again for your feedback, and best of luck in your coding journey. Our doors are always open to our students.
  • Anonymous • JavaScript Developer • Graduate
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    I was in the last JavaScript Development Accelerator before it transitioned into the 401 in Portland. I can't say enough about how much I enjoyed this program. I know from talking with people at network events and from interviews that Code Fellows has a reputation for covering the fundamentals and keeping up with the newest technologies. I recieved a small grant which I was thankful for, but regardless I feel that the curated curriculum is worth the cost.

    It is an intense program and I feel like you should be prepared for 10 weeks of around-the-clock coding. The class I took started at 9:00AM with lecture until noon, and then lab hours until 5:00PM. In the evening, I worked and studied until late. I mention this because that is what it takes to cram over a years worth of independent work into 10 weeks. This program works, but you have to be willing to put in your maximum effort!

    The program's support of students is amazing, and I felt that they invested in our success. There were guest lecturers on every Friday to talk about what they look for in an interview candidate, how to network, how to whiteboard, etc. I found those lectures to be valuable in my post-graduation job search. Code Fellows admins sent me weekly job leads. The job search curriculum stresses the importance of networking. For me, networking isn't fun, but it is clearly important and I am thankful that I trusted the system and followed my teachers' and administrators' advice.   

    I just got hired after two months of job searching and I couldn't be happier about my experience at Code Fellows and the support I've recieved since graduating. 

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Thursday, Apr 07 2016
    Wow, this is so awesome! Congrats! 

    Thank you for taking the time to come back and share about your experience—even though I’m sure you’re busy with the new gig. Success stories like these are why we do what we do. Seriously: There are hi-fives and fist-pumps around the office with every single placement report that comes through. It’s daily motivation for us!

    Once you feel settled in, come on back for a visit! We’d love to hear how your new career unfolds. 
  • Disappointed
    - 3/14/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    Job Assistance: the professional development page gives a much stronger impression of the support you will find during the ten week program. Instead of professional development for one hour during 6 of the ten weeks it is a 6 hour day on the sixth and eighth week.  The six hour days only contains about two to three hours of actual content. The rest of the time is doing what they call workshop where you write answers in paper. They say they have you do this onsite because people don't do these exercises at home. 30-45 minute topics are on: your brand; linked in page and inward facing partner profile; interview prep and a guest speaker on tech interviews. 

    The info isn't bad. However, for the limited amount of time they give guidance it should be a firehouse of information and guidance.

    There was one career fair hosted three weeks before we graduated. Our class wasn't invited. Only previous graduates were. Odd as we all need jobs and were on the verge of finishing the program.

    Their page says that you will receive a mentor. Unfortunately, that isn't accurate.

    Their main advice. Network. That's absolutely true. I wish the professional development page on their website would be more humble and say it's really up to you to go out and sell yourself with the coding skills you've developed. Their is no shame in that promise of professional development.

    Curriculum:

    The curriculum isn't bad. You basically learn the MEAN stack. You will work weekends in groups. Lots of test driven development. Study that if you haven't. My biggest concern was that this course taught the same curriculum over ten weeks that our teacher admits he covered over eight weeks for the previous three development accelerators. It was $4,000 more for the exact same content that seemed stretched out. Many days of lecture felt like time inneficiently spent. That wasn't a good feeling. As far as I'm concerned they owe the students who took that class a deep apology and a refund of the extra 50% cost. Supply and demand I guess. 

    Instructor: this was probably the most challenging part for me. Our teacher seemed like he really didn't care about the students. This was such a pivotal moment of our lives in which we made huge financial sacrifices and time sacrifices and time pulled away from loved ones. It was so discouraging to have a passion and excitement to do something new and to have a teacher who appeared to just be coasting. Our teacher knew how to code. There is no question about that. Teaching is something different. Code fellows should take into consideration that their teachers really represent them as we don't get to meet many of the staff who I'm sure care and are hard working and do have a vision for people to succeed and transform their lives.

    Overall experience: I've ran into people from other code camps and this isn't an unfamiliar phenomenal. The code camp pages, recruiters, preview nights are always going to glow with how much they are going to do for you. But the biggest indicator of success are two things. One, you have surrounded yourself with people who are committed and passionate. Two, your passion and drive. 

    The code school can definitely enhance those things. The 401 for me, however, didn't.

     

     

  • In Transition
    - 2/10/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    Code Fellows is in a major transition and there is a feeling of chaos - at least on their Seattle campus.

    More than half of our Code 301 class at the end of four weeks still remained ineligible to take their Code 401 classes, which begs the question: Is Code Fellows setting up students for failure? Why aren't they giving students the right advice to prepare for these classes?

    During our project week, the actual rubrics for these projects was only given after our assignments were handed in. Why?

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Wednesday, Mar 02 2016
    First off, thanks for being a student with Code Fellows and for sharing your candid feedback about Code 301. Our students' feedback is valuable to us and we appreciate your honesty as we continually work to improve our program. 

    We're sorry that you didn't have a good experience in this course, and that you were negatively impacted during the roll out of our new curriculum. Our full curriculum is designed to take people from beginner to career-ready is as short a timeframe as possible, and unfortunately this intense pace doesn't work for everyone. Although four out of five students in Code 301 so far are ready to progress to Code 401 by then end of the 4-week course, some need more time and training to solidify new or more complex topics before they're ready to start Code 401. 

    If you have any concerns that you'd like to talk about, please feel free to come in and talk to us so that we can make it right. Our doors are always open!
  • So So
    - 2/9/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    I recently went through their Code 301 course.  Could have received the same education through Tree house or Code Academy though and saved a lot of $.  

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Wednesday, Mar 09 2016
    Thanks for sharing your honest feedback about the Code 301 course. I'm sorry that you didn't receive the value you were expecting in this course. 

    At Code Fellows, we love Treehouse and Codecademy, and frequently recommend those resources to our students before, during, and after our courses. Our students often tell us that they learn more deeply when they have in-person help when they are stuck, can tackle projects with pair programming, partake in live code reviews, and receive personalized instruction. 

    For those considering studying online, we highly recommend also attending in-person meetups and taking time to connect with and learn from software developers who have been in the industry for a while. Previous Code Fellows students are also welcome to come back and use our coworking space. 

    We wish you the best in your ongoing learning journey. If you'd like to come in and talk about any other concerns you had about your time at Code Fellows, please let us know! 
  • Anonymous • Sofware Engineer • Graduate
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    I attended one of the last full stack javascript accelerator programs before it turned into '401'. I think it's basically the same, but the course was slightly shorter and cost less money. I never attended the prereq courses.

    I think the program was absolutely awesome for me. I learned a ton, and got a great job about 5 weeks after graduation. Plus I use what I learned all the time with my new job as a software engineer. Our instructor Tyler was top notch, and I really think the curriculum was an optimized way to learn.

    I have to admit that the Code Fellows I attended may be significantly different than the one that exists now. The courses, cost, and enrollment numbers are all different now from my understanding. It sounds like they are trying to increase tuition and enrollment across the board. I think it's fine to do that, but I wonder if that hurts the general rigor and selectivity of the school. I noticed they no longer have the job guarantee. I think that's a little sad, since I know I would not have attended without it. I still think that it's a great program that was absolutely key in my professional development. My teacher was awesome and I was lucky enough to be part of a cohort with some extremely talented peers. 

    If you're doing it right, you will be working for the knowledge that the course provides and not the certificate. My company didn't recognize Code Fellows at all, but they certainly saw that I was technically competant during my interview process. I can't attribute everything to CF. I taught myself javascript for 7 months prior to enrolling, but I would say I learned the most job relevant JS during the Code Fellows months.

    Overall, I'd say that if you are genuinely interested in computers and will work your arse off, then this is a great place to fulfill your potential. However, if you are approaching this like getting a generic college degree so you can have a piece of paper that says you are qualified, then you got it all wrong. You have to work hard to make this work. Code Fellows is only one piece of the puzzle.    

       

     

    Response From: Brook Riggio of Code Fellows
    Title: VP of Education
    Wednesday, Mar 09 2016
    Thanks for your review! We're glad to be a part of your ongoing journey. The new program is modular for this very reason. It's awesome when programmers can jump straight into our advanced courses. While some students opt for Code 201 and 301 to get up to speed, we love that there are so many quality resources available for developers who are ready to dive into JavaScript development. Congrats on your new job and feel free to stop back by the campus to say hello!
  • Anonymous
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    Right now it seems like the main goal of this company is to make a profit, and not actually turn out top notch programmers. They've split up their classes now, and are making a total of 20k off of students who go through the whole course. Their scholarships are miniscule. The TA's are usually students who finished the course before and don't actually know what they're talking about. Apparently the job gaurantee has gone away, and they didn't bother to notify any of their 401 students. 

    I had a great 201 and 301 experience, but will not be taking the 401 (the course that really matters). The teachers in the 201 and 301 were fantastic, and there were a few TA's (that have since left on to bigger and better things) that were great as well. But for 12k, you expect that to translate into the 401...it doesn't. 

  • to take note of...
    - 1/10/2016
    Anonymous
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    Codefellows broke up their development accelerator, which means you'll have to complete several courses (i.e CF201, CF301 and a 401) before you can specailise in either Javascript, Python or iOS. This also means higher course fees and a longer time out of the market. There was a lot of emphasis on getting you to move on to the next course, which meant it was hard to fail and you might not get honest feedback. In 201, the instructors and TAs were former students with no industry/teaching experience and modifying the syllabus from previous batches. Also, their programs are catered for locals, with international students receiving limited support. 

    If these do not bother you, then CF is a reasonable place to get you where you have to be in terms of web development foundations. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    My experience was with the Python Dev Accelerator out of Seattle. Here are my thoughts.

    Pros:

    • Our instructor Cris was amazingly helpful; he works incredibly hard
    • The average student out of my Dev Accelerator was quite capable and talented; at least for my class, it was relatively high caliber
    • I got lucky and got a job that I really enjoy. I think I'm one of 7 out of 16 with a permanent position six months after starting
    • The curriculum that Cris created was good. It was a nice blend of working with up-to-date libraries while also developing CS fundamentals

    Cons:

    • Codefellows has gotten more expensive (12k for final program now and 20k for the full course; used to be 12k for the full course)
    • The 9 month job guarantee has quietly gone away
    • Each Codefellows Dev Accelerator (it's now called 401) is a one-man-show; single instructor classes despite each class being 100-200k in gross revenue
    • While there is some friendly job support via Gina, it really isn't enough. Many people were struggling to find good skill/career-building activities to pick up afterwards
    • The graduation statistics currently at codefellows.org/student-success-stories (which previously lived at codefellows.org/alumni-stats) haven't been updated properly in about 2 years. Average graduate salaries have gone down and job search times have gone up, and the histograms on this page are exactly the same that were there 2 years ago. As of writing this review they still cherry-pick update this page, which I find dishonest
    • The cost per unit time is on-par with high-profile bootcamps, including Hack Reactor and Galvanize. Those programs might have more comprehensive job and career support
    • Cris is worth whatever money he got. The value that Code Fellows adds is not worth it. Overall the program feels overpriced from a service-value perspective
  • Highly Recommend
    - 12/21/2015
    Anonymous • Student
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    I've taken two classes with Code Fellows thus far and have really enjoyed both. The learning atmosphere from my classmates to the instructors were always available to assist any time that I had a question. 

    Not only did I learn a lot of new things, I also have the experience of collaboration with other coders working on a project as well as a small portfolio of projects built up for when I go to seek a job.

    This pace of learning is a great choice if you're just looking to get out there and do right away. You can only learn so much by reading in a book, so I really like that Code Fellows focuses on real world applications and practices.

  • J M • Implementation Specialist • Graduate
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    It covers HTML, CSS, Javascript and using a Javascript Library (jquery). It's pretty quick overall. In theory it sounded great, and it was at night which made it approachable. I'm actually reviewing the previous iteration of this class, that was also a heck of a lot cheaper.

    The class started off pretty strong, but suffered from some serious structural issues going forward. It seemed to be a section of their full-time class that had been stretched over a longer period of time. My professor seemed incredibly intelligent, but in such a crowded class he came across a little overwhelmed. I think the group size (130+ participants) If anyone was to ask questions it felt out of place, there was interaction but always felt forced...like it was really just meant to be a lecture. While I'm certain the professor knew the material very well, he approached the class in a way that almost made him seem like he was the one who didn't do his homework. The whole thing felt a little unprepared.

    Great guy, odd class. I guess it did the job, in the most quick and dirty sort of way but I'm not sure I'd be interested in spending more on something full-time.