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Fullstack Academy

Chicago, New York City, Online

Fullstack Academy

Avg Rating:4.9 ( 248 reviews )

Fullstack Academy offers full-time and part-time immersive software engineering bootcamps and cyber security bootcamps, with campuses in New York City, Chicago, and online. Fullstack's software engineering courses cover advanced JavaScript-oriented technologies and computer science topics including compiler theory, logic gates, and building an operating system. The cyber bootcamp covers encryption, networking, system architecture, cryptography, risk detection, and more. Fullstack Academy offers flexible options for college students and those who wish to continue working while learning modern tech skills. The Summer of Code program is an accelerated version of the immersive bootcamp for college students on summer break.

The full- and part-time immersives in NY and Chicago are for intermediate programmers who’ve learned the basics before applying, while the cyber and university bootcamps are specifically designed for beginners. Bootcamp Prep classes are available to help students prepare for admissions. To apply, candidates should submit an application via the website, take an online coding assessment (software engineering bootcamp) or a basic logical reasoning test (cyber bootcamp), then participate in a video interview.

Fullstack Academy programs aim to combine a cutting-edge technical curriculum with career counseling to make sure students can both do a technical job, and get a technical job. Fullstack hosts a Demo Day, which includes speed interviewing sessions, and the careers team helps students connect with the right people, interview successfully, and negotiate the best offer possible. 

Recent Fullstack Academy Reviews: Rating 4.9

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  • Bootcamp Prep in a Month

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Express.js, Node.js, Front End
    In PersonPart Time12 Hours/week4 Weeks
    Start Date December 2, 2019
    Cost$250
    Class size40
    LocationOnline, New York City, Chicago
    **NOTE: Prep In a Month courses are best for folks who have some previous experience with programming.** Fullstack Academy's Bootcamp Prep courses are free with refund (which means you'll get back everything you've paid upon completion of the course) and will prepare you for the full-time software engineering programs at both Fullstack and Grace Hopper (our all-women's school), plus Fullstack's part-time Flex program. These courses teach the fundamentals of programming and show you how to use JavaScript to solve real-world coding problems. Best of all, they're taught by working developers who once graduated from one of Fullstack's programs, so you can really get a feel for the environment we foster and the kinds of smart, driven, generous people our community is made up of.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Refund / GuaranteeFull refund upon course completion.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelAdvanced-Beginner
    Prep WorkIncludes a 10-hr prep workshop. Not required, but highly recommended to help students get the most out of class.
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
    More Start Dates
    December 2, 2019 - New York City Apply by November 26, 2019
    December 2, 2019 - Chicago Apply by November 26, 2019
    December 2, 2019 - Online Apply by November 26, 2019
  • Bootcamp Prep in a Week

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Express.js, Node.js, Front End
    In PersonFull Time1 Week
    Start Date December 14, 2019
    Cost$250
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationOnline, New York City
    **NOTE: Prep In a Week courses are best for folks who have some previous experience with programming.** Fullstack Academy's Bootcamp Prep courses are free with refund (which means you'll get back everything you've paid upon completion of the course) and will prepare you for the full-time software engineering programs at both Fullstack and Grace Hopper (our all-women's school), plus Fullstack's part-time Flex program. These courses teach the fundamentals of programming and show you how to use JavaScript to solve real-world coding problems, and best of all? They're taught by working developers who once graduated from one of Fullstack's programs, so you can really get a feel for the environment we foster and the kinds of smart, driven, generous people our community is made up of.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Refund / GuaranteeFull refund upon course completion.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelAdvanced-beginners
    Prep WorkIncludes a 10-hr prep workshop. Not required, but highly recommended to help students get the most out of class.
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
    More Start Dates
    December 14, 2019 - Online Apply by December 9, 2019
    December 14, 2019 - New York City Apply by December 9, 2019
  • Flex (Part-Time) Immersive

    Apply
    Start Date January 14, 2020
    Cost$15,980
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationNew York City, Chicago
    Flex offers an opportunity to complete the rigorous Fullstack immersive program, but over a six-month span, while keeping a full-time job. Students attend class in-person two nights per week, and remotely one night per week. Each month will have one immersive weekend, where Flex students come to campus both Saturday and Sunday. The other three weekends will consist of remote work -- not requiring live attendance. These remote weekends will utilize learning tools that work well in that format: video lectures and workshop reviews, solo coding workshops, and even pair-programming with classmates using virtual collaboration tools. This remote work will be self-paced -- completed by a deadline, but on the student’s schedule.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Fullstack Academy partners with Skills Fund.
    Scholarship$1,000 scholarship for women; $1,000 scholarship for veterans. $2,000 built-in scholarship for Chicago students.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelAdvanced-beginner/Intermediate programming skills
    Prep Work4-week Foundations Course
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    January 14, 2020 - New York City Apply by November 17, 2019
  • Fullstack Cyber Bootcamp

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$17,610
    Class size25
    LocationNew York City
    The Fullstack Cyber Bootcamp is a full-time, 17-week training program that prepares students to get cyber security jobs as pen testers and SOC analysts after graduation. Operated by Fullstack Academy, one of the longest-running coding bootcamps in the nation, the Fullstack Cyber Bootcamp is part of New York City’s $100-million-dollar Cyber NYC initiative, which aims to transform the City of New York into a global cyber hub. In keeping with this mission, the City is sponsoring 24 low-income New Yorkers to attend the first cohort of the Fullstack Cyber Bootcamp tuition-free. Head to the web page for eligibility information.
    Financing
    Deposit2,000
    ScholarshipFull scholarships to our inaugural cohort (including deposit refund upon program completion) available for qualifying NYers. Made possible by the City of New York's CyberNYC initiative. See website for eligibility information & additional scholarships.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep WorkTake our introduction to the industry, Hacking 101, before you interview: https://cyber.fullstackacademy.com/prepare/hacking-101
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • NYC Web Development Fellowship

    Apply
    Data Science, HTML, Git, JavaScript, SQL, jQuery, CSS, Express.js, React.js, Node.js
    In PersonFull Time17 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    CostN/A
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationNew York City
    In partnership with the NYC Tech Talent Pipeline, the NYC Web Development Fellowship will award ~40 NYC residents tuition-free admission to Fullstack's award-winning Software Engineering program. This curriculum has been proven successful -- Fullstack graduates are now working at companies like Google, Venmo, Facebook, Amazon, and LinkedIn, as well as hundreds of innovative small- and mid-size tech companies. Learn more about the fellowship as well as eligibility restrictions on the Fullstack website: https://www.fullstackacademy.com/nyc-fellowship
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    ScholarshipFree Tuition for Eligible NYC Residents
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelN/A
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Software Engineering Immersive

    Apply
    Start Date January 13, 2020
    Cost$17,910
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationNew York City, Chicago
    Fullstack Academy’s flagship course, the Full-Time Software Engineering Immersive is a 17-week career accelerator. Through an advanced curriculum and project-based structure, students learn today’s cutting edge development technologies. The Fullstack Immersive prepares graduates for software engineer roles at top-tier technology companies. Our JavaScript-driven curriculum immerses you in the latest web technologies such as Node.js, React.js, and postgreSQL. You bring the energy, curiosity, and dedication — we'll provide a world-class school for becoming an expert software developer.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Fullstack Academy has partnerships with Skills Fund and Upstart.
    ScholarshipBuilt-in $2,000 student scholarship; $1,000 scholarship for women; $1,000 scholarship for veterans.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelAdvanced-beginner/Intermediate programming skills
    Prep Work4-week remote Foundations Course precedes the 13 weeks on-campus
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    January 13, 2020 - New York City Apply by November 24, 2019
    January 13, 2020 - Chicago Apply by November 24, 2019
  • Summer of Code

    Apply
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$16,910
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationNew York City, Chicago
    Summer of Code is a coding education program uniquely designed for ambitious college students seeking to supplement their traditional education by learning real world skills and building a portfolio of impressive projects. You bring the energy, curiosity and fierce dedication — we'll provide a world-class school for becoming an expert level coder in one summer.
    Financing
    DepositN/A
    Financing
    Fullstack Academy has partnerships with Skills Fund and Upstart
    ScholarshipBuilt-in $2,000 student scholarship; $1,000 scholarship for women.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelCollege students only.
    Prep Work4-week Foundations course
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes

1 Scholarship

  • $500 Fullstack Academy Scholarship

    Course Report is excited to offer an exclusive Fullstack Academy scholarship for $500 off tuition!

    Eligibility

    Offer is only valid for new applicants. Applicants who have already submitted an application cannot claim this scholarship.

    Qualifying Courses

    • Software Engineering Immersive (Chicago)

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  • Tara Lerias • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    I was in the Fullstack Spring 2014 class and it was the best decision I've ever made in my life. Web development has always been something that has interested me, so I decided to quit my job to go to a bootcamp. I applied to quite a few bootcamps but during my interview when I spoke with Nimit for the first time (one of the co-founders/lead instructors) I knew that Fullstack Academy was the one for me. When class started, I met David (the other co-founder/lead instructor) and immediately knew I made the right decision. You can't find better instructors when it comes to learning development because these two know their shit. Not only are they great teachers with reputable Software Engineer resumes, but they are great guys that you end up becoming good friends with. I highly recommend Fullstack Academy to anyone considering a bootcamp.

  • Anonymous • Student
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    I don't regret going to FSA. I have an engineering job as a result of what I learned at the program, but a few things rubbed me the wrong way. I'm going to focus mostly on negatives because I haven't read some of my biggest concerns in other reviews. Also, apologies for the rambling and disorganization below, I acknowledge the structure of my review could be better.

    Fullstack Academy is not equipped properly to handle everyone of all levels

    I think they removed this from their website, but they use to state that everyone from all backgrounds would benefit from going to FSA, even seasoned programmers who want to brush up their skills. Some people with programming experience, especially seniors, would pull their teeth out with the amount of pair programming the bootcamp forces you to do. I personally wish they did less pair programming. They immediately alienate people with programming experience in the first week by doing a long workshop on why pair programming is the best way to learn. FSA tries to prove the point that pairing beginners with beginners leads to the most amount of growth, but they fail to discuss intermediate and expert level programmers paired with beginners. The beginners obviously learn a lot from people with more experience, but, ultimately, the people with the most experience get dragged down a little by less experienced partners. You're not supposed to finish every workshop, but some of the more knowledgeable people would benefit more from finishing the workshop all the way through, and doing the extra credit, instead of teaching their partner the workshop. FSA recommends finishing the workshops at home anyway, but it could feel like class time is wasted time. This applies to both experienced programmers and fast learners who end up becoming the top of the class.

    I think FSA needs to work on a way to better balance the curriculum for beginners, those with a background in programming, and fast learners. The curriculum is great for computer science graduates because a lot of universities do not teach full stack technologies or web dev, however, workshops and especially group projects can be painful when you're not supposed to move on if your partner does not understand what's going on. I'm not saying person who is struggling should be left in the dust, I'm saying it's just not ideal scenario for both parties, and I do not believe that FSA handles the students who struggle the most appropriately, but I'll talk about that in a later section. FSA has to rely on pair programming due to not having enough resources (teachers and teaching assistants) to support every student during a workshop.

    Those with a CS degree also want to do a bootcamp like FSA because they want help in building a portfolio for job hunting, so the second half of the program sounds incredibly appealing. FSA gives you a ton of code and knowledge of a stack that you can leverage to build your own projects, but it's difficult to produce a decently functional app in the short amount of time you're given if you have to code along with someone who is struggling. Yes, you can work on the app after you've graduated but some people want to immediately dive into the job hunt once the program ends. I witnessed a couple students do the entire project for the rest of their team, which really sucks for the people who didn't actually end up doing the project because they can't even explain the code. In this scenario, I think it would be better to match students of similar levels for projects so everyone will learn together (as FSA even stated at the beginning of the program).

    Additionally, there's a little bit of a toxic culture towards individuals who have a computer science degree or had a programming job. This is not only specific to FSA, I have encountered other bootcampers who express the same sentiment. FSA's curriculum is great for CS degree graduates who were never taught full-stack technologies. Despite these graduates not knowing web dev, other students talked about the experienced people and asked "why are they even in this program?", or put down computer science majors for not knowing the same things bootcampers know. It was enough to make me feel uncomfortable and that reaction is unwelcoming to students who do have a CS degree. It's one thing to say you accomplished something without a four year degree, but it's another thing to put someone else down for it.

    FSA does not provide enough support for the top strugglers

    As mentioned earlier above. FSA should be more strict with who passes junior phase. The strugglers would really benefit from redoing the first phase (which is a possibility) instead of FSA expecting other students to educate the struggler during the final phase when these other students are already past that point and want to start developing applications. Someone from my cohort didn't finish and understand the last project before senior phase, had redo the project, and somehow "passed" even though they still did not understand React and Redux in senior phase. FSA threw them on a team for the first project, and expected the rest of the team to catch the person up with pair programming. This person ended up even more left behind because the team wanted to have a working app. It's not a great situation for everyone involved and is a great diservice to the person who's struggling.

    There are not enough teaching assistants, not long enough office hours, and class sizes are way too big. My cohort size was around 40 students, which FSA mislead me about when I was applying. I asked several times how big classes are and they either gave me a non-answer (it fluctuates with the seasons) or told me about 20. I was not expecting that class size. Students do not get enough attention or resources amongst large class sizes. Increasing the class sizes also floods the market with even more junior dev job seekers, so it's even more difficult to get an engineering job.

    FSA is misleading about their outcomes

    I'm not a big fan of the fact that they showcase success stories and companies who have hired graduates from the first year or two of FSA, when bootcamps were probably at their peak. They also do not explicitly state how many people get non-software engineer jobs like product management, support engineer, or solution constultant. Not all graduates land programming jobs, quite a few end up in a form of a technical role that does not involve coding. FSA also links to out of date CIRR reports that have higher success rates.

    FSA spends too much time on "sharing your feelings" and "bonding" events/workshops

    Someone did mention this in another review, and I also felt the same way. You are forced to go to lunch with a group every week to share your highs and lows. There are retrospectives where you compliment other people in the class for something they did well. Sometimes FSA ends the day early for bonding activities with other classmates or fellows. It felt like wasted time when I paid so much, and FSA already moves too fast and doesn't spend enough time on certain topics. Also, somewhat related, everyone is an adult, but I felt like I was being treated as a child by how certain FSA staff talked to the class.

     

     

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    If you’re thinking about a boot camp, go to Fullstack. That’s the gist of this. Boot camps won’t totally prepare you, but they do a pretty good job, and you should get ahead of this as much as possible because there might be a job bubble coming if there already isn’t one. 

    Students: They clearly care about who they let in to the cohort. Most students are kind, sociable, and chill. Some are especially decent. A couple are bummers, but the ratio is outstanding. Everyone stops what they’re doing to help each other out. I have made great friends from Fullstack. I was someone who was going in thinking “this will be cool but these aren’t going to be my people”. They will be your people. If you're thinking of changing careers or adding a skillset, the student body alone is a reason to choose Fullstack.

    Company + Personnel: Fullstack is scrappy, mostly transparent, and they take you seriously. The instructors are good, super smart, and very kind. They're completely sincere and straight forward with you. Only the people whose job it is to be obtuse will be obtuse, and even then they do their best to no be, and for the most part, understand that’s sort of their function within the structure of the company. People here work hard to show that they care. The fellows (the student teachers) range from being brilliant and kind to being NOT the best engineers ever but still very kind. They are all wonderful and committed to being helpful. This is a reflection of the student body again, and the commitment to a stellar culture. The recent Bridgewater purchase of Fullstack makes me nervous, but I doubt they'll interfere too much with how the company is run for now. Just look out for that, I guess.

    Education: I know JavaScript. That's just true. I understand most things about it at a fundamental level. I have a stack I can code in. I felt fully supported the whole time, with tons of opportunity for extra help and practice even after school was out. The exams were tough but fair. I have made more than one app since graduating, like, got it up and running by myself. They were dinky toy apps, and most were used for interview projects, but I can do that now. It's wild. It will be brutal, it will be fast paced, but seriously trust the process. You'll see a lot of people say that, and they're right. The process won't help you get a job, but it will allow you to learn a lot very quickly.

    All that said, there’s a lot more to learn, and relearn, and relearn. You will still be a junior when you leave. You graduate an engineer in that you can engineer things, but you’re going to be very confused looking at a large codebase, you’re going to forget a lot of what you learned, and you’re going to feel stupid but you’re not! They teach you well, so you’ll be able to brush up on what you forgot. It's 3 months though. Take it easy on yourself. You are pretty much job ready, and that's amazing.

    Most importantly — despite their best efforts, unless you have a BS in Computer Science or general experience with CS, you will lack those CS fundamentals and algorithm skills. If you can help it, spend a couple hours a week practicing algorithms before the second half of the program where you will practice more frequently. It’ll be a lot less rough when you get out of the program that way.

    Diversity + Culture: The environment is great. Fullstack is pretty progressive regarding identity politics so that's really nice. I mean, not everyone who is there totally gets it, but everyone is very friendly and I knew at least one trans person who had a solid experience at Grace Hopper, and I know there were other NB folks who did well there. There is still a lack of diversity mostly in gender and sexuality in the Fullstack cohorts. Mostly dudes, mostly white, with a few SEA and EA guys (my cohort had one queer person and no black people). Almost no women because they usually go to GH, which can make it a bit of a boys club, but the environment does a great job preventing that from happening (GH helps too, you interact with your sister cohort quite a bit). GH had a lot more overall diversity.

    But yeah, just reemphasizing that the culture is overall really great. Very surprised how cool everyone was. They clearly care a lot.

    Other thoughts:

    The whole boot camp thing is nuts. You go in there, and you're learning a hundred new things a day, and they're trying to give you theory but also trying to make sure you can actually get something up and running so you have projects on your resume by the time you graduate, and they spend a good amount of time practicing whiteboarding problems but it isn't enough, and you're meeting new people, and you're working 60+ hours a week, and you're not seeing any of your friends and family (or if you are, not that often) and it's just bananas. Fullstack is pretty great, and there will be people who are better at identifying specific negatives about the program. I had a good time, I did well for myself, any flaws I saw seemed to be no fault of theirs as much as it was the fault of boot camps as a whole. I think if you have a different background or you're a different kind of person, maybe Fullstack isn't right for you. I don't know. Read other reviews, they helped me a lot when I was deciding.

    You're almost definitely not going to come out of this interview ready. Some of you will, because some of you are wired for this. God bless. Most of you will not, and you'll probably take a very high paying hybrid role (sales + engineering usually) and do quite well for yourself. There just aren't as many junior roles out there right now. The industry is starting to grow wise to the fact that they can avoid hiring new engineers by just paying seniors more money to create systems that do junior work for them. Yes it is unfair, but that's how this works right now. There are a ton of great folks in software though looking to mentor people. Find them -- they will help you. Unless you have a lot of natural talent (and even if you do), it's going to be a long road. A handful of folks from my cohort got jobs after a normal amount of time (3 - 4 months), but a majority are still looking (4 - 5 months in right now).

    None of this boot camp stuff is sustainable, but it is available right now, and it is totally feasible that you leave Fullstack with a high paying job in the tech space. Also, if you come from a relatively privileged background, and you're young, and you don't have a lot of direction, just do it. Nothing out there is going to fulfill you right now, but you'll be able to get some direction in your life towards a discipline that pays well with tons of flexibility, you'll get out in front of the incoming automation wave,  and you can maybe even have some time and energy and capital after all of this to eventually do something you like for a living that isn't actively contributing to the siphoning of wealth from the bottom to the top. I don't know.

    If any of this sounds appealing to you go to Fullstack. If I sound like someone who thinks like you go to Fullstack. It’s probably the best boot camp around.

  • Amazing experience
    - 12/14/2018
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    I had an incredible experience at Fullstack academy. I came into the program with hardly any coding experience and left feeling like a certified pro. The instructors were made the course such a wonderful academy. Unlike my college educators, the Fullstack instructors were engaging, thoughtful, and made learning quite fun. I would recommend the class to anyone that has an interest in becoming a software engineer. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    The 14 weeks onsite at FullStack were intense, challenging and very thorough  The instructors are deeply knowledgable (and very patient).    The curiculllum was clearly set out at the beginning of each phase.  Pair programming and test driven development kept things interesting daily. Workshops and test were challenging and really helped motivate me.   There are several bigger projects as you progress through the course and they really helped increase my understanding and enthusiam for software development.  

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    Fullstack was truly an amazing experience and I would recommend it to anyone. Coming in with almost no computer science background, I was worried I wouldn't be able to keep up. The instructional team went above and beyond to ensure that I understood the material and provided every resource I could possibly need to succeed. If you are considering attending a bootcamp, Fullstack should be at the top of your list.

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    Fullstack's curriculum is pretty great and very up to date. Fullstack gives you a solid foundation for modern web development careers. Every project was jam packed with essential programming concepts, which was overwhelming at first, but it was useful to return to these projects during the studying phase of my job search. I also felt that my instructors were genuinely interested in web development and also in teaching. Fullstack is very high quaility bootcamp and you cant go wrong if you choose it. 

  • Anonymous • Associate Software Engineer • Student
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    pros:
    1. full-stack JavaScript-focused curriculum with strong emphasis on React.js was a perfect fit for jobs in the NYC market;
    2. amazing, committed instructors;
    3. project-based and collaborative (pair-programming throughout) was a plus in interviews;
    4. Career Services helped me negotiate a higher salary

    cons:
    1. not enough emphasis on becoming proficient at writing tests (e.g. Jest, Mocha, etc.), and
    2. Career Services was great at the negotiation phase, but they seem to be too busy to give too much individualized focus before that point

    general advice:
    1. Computer Science fundamentals is extremely important, but only so much of it can be taught in a 4 month program - make sure you study algorithms and web fundamentals on your own after graduation;
    2. I probably was under-qualified for admission into this extremely rigorous program, which meant that I was constantly trying to catch up. I didn't really hit my stride until a month or two after graduation as I continued practicing on my own. Do your best to take advantage of free resources prior to the bootcamp (such as FreeCodeCamp)

  • Anonymous • UX Engineering Intern at Goldman Sachs • Student
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    I attended Fullstack as a Summer of Code student. I was weary of attending at first since I am already a computer science student, and thought it may be "overkill." But it was worth it in the end because I learned so many valuable skillsets that I would have not encountered otherwise. The interview prep support was also tremendous, and I really enjoyed learning and working with others who are equally motivated. Shoutout to Kate who was a wonderful mentor and teacher throughout my Senior phase! If you are weary about price/experience, just now that this is such a worthwhile experience and I feel way more confident in my programming abilities now. If I had any criticism, it would be that specific internship support wasn't available, but I got enough out of the job support that it didn't make a huge difference for me. 

     

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    If you are serious about changing careers into the tech industry, definitely consider Fullstack Academy. It was chanllenging, but you get out what you put in. The job search comes after the bootcamp can be even tougher. Be ready. 

    Aside from getting a great experience from the bootcamp, I also gain an amazing Fullstack network which I treasure a lot.

  • Anonymous • JavaScript Developer • Graduate
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    Foundations was incredibly challenging. Junior phase was very challenging. Senior phase was challenging. Everything got easier over time because your confidence improved and your understanding of the context of what you were learning improved, and your skills for learning improved. At the beginning we all kept telling each other and ourselves, "trust the process." It got easier to trust over time. We got a lot closer than I thought we'd be able to over a remote platform, but it really felt like we were all hanging out every day. I made friends that I still talk to all the time. The instructors are not equal, but they're all very competent and helpful. Everyone in the tech world that I talked to after the program was thoroughly impressed by my knowledge and experience from Fullstack. I felt great during interviews and ended up with 2 offers. It's not all perfect, you've got to advocate for yourself and take initiative to get out of the program what you need from it. At the end of the day I really had fun in the program and I'm literally making more than double what I was in my last profession (with a master's degree) with no prior tech education or experience. What more is there?

  • Anonymous • Junior Software Engineer • Student
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    For me, leaving my career and starting this bootcamp was a huge risk. It would mean spending most of my savings to continue to live in NYC will not working, not working for the first time in 12 years which grated on my psyche and not being sure I would get a job quickly... if at all in this field. 

    Grace Hopper was well worth it. You can tell from the get-go that it's a mutual investment because of the tuition policy but it's more than that. I do have some criticism regarding my cohort in particular and the lack of consistency of instruction - but we still did learn a substantial amount. 

    In terms of instruction - the curriculum is clearly tried and tested and is being iterated on consistently which is key. It does require a lot of self-direction and motivation but.. it's a bootcamp so that's to be expected. I was disappointed by the fact that we didn't have consistent instructors (only had one for quite a few weeks) and that I don't feel the instruction was always very strong. You can be an amazing engineer without knowing how to communicate that to other people. Instructors need to be able to communicate that to other people and stay organized. 

    One thing I can't say was awesome enough was the career success team. Again - you need to stay on top of your own stuff - but they will support you really well (at least my counselor did). She was responsive and no-nonsense and made it very clear that the goal was to get you a job that you could thrive in for a while to come. My resume and linkedin and negotiation skills have never been better. At hiring day, I met so many companies that followed through with interviews and got and accepted my first offer within a month. And if that hadn't been the right offer for me, they would've helped me come to terms with rejecting the offer and making a plan for how to get a better one. 

    Moral of the story: if you're thinking about it seriously, do it. It'll be worth it. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    My experience at Fullstack Academy was truly remarkable. I had an amazing time at Fullstack and it redefined my career goals as my job search was more successful than I ever could have hoped. The technical foundation you are provided with truly is enough to obtain a job at a top company. The quality of other students was very high and it was truly special to learn alongside so many interesting people who had succeeded in many different areas and industries. I could not reccommend Fullstack more highly. The only caveat I would note is that the expereince is what you make of it and it is not magic. You must be willing to put in the work to fully reap the benefits of this amazing program

  • Great experience
    - 5/24/2017
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    Fullstack was not just a great bootcamp experience, but one of the best educational experiences of my life. The team of instructors does a great job creating a sense of community. The curriculum is incredibly thorough, and by the senior phase of the program I could not believe the kinds of projects we were producing. I think the only downside was that the instructors are incredibly capable and experienced programmers, but they don't have much teaching experience. Overall, FSA is a great program that really produces job-ready graduates.

  • Anonymous • Student
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    Really nice progression of material - liked the instructors a lot and they offered a lot of help with material that I had been struggling with.  In the application process now and feeling a lot more confident for all the interviews that are upcoming!

  • Anonymous • Front End Engineer • Graduate
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    Going to Fullstack was one of the best decisions I ever made. 

    There's a lot of things that come into play when you're transitioning to a new career, especially in the tech field. 

    A purely educational course isn't enough. Anyone can take an online video course in their pj's at home and learn the same material I learned at Fullstack. 

    What you get is a community of people who you'll potentially know and make life-time friends with, who are all going through the same experience as you. Also you'll get staff who are invested in you, supportive, and who know what it's like to be in the tech industry. Staff that wants to know what you're up to months later, that helps you with a job interview a year after you graduate, and staff that basically just wants to see you suceed. 

    Not becuase there's something in it for them, but becuase they honestly want to see people at their true potential.

    I had virutally no previous experience in coding before I attended Fullstack (other than what I needed to know to pass the application) and I won't lie, getting a job wasn't as easy as I thought it would be. But I've learned so much at Fullstack, and continue to learn becuase of the skills they taught me. And becuase of that, a year after graduating, I'm in a position I never thought I'd be, earning more thant I ever thought I could. It's ignited this passion in me and I'm positive that flame was started by the spirit of the Fullstack staff. 

    If you're in the New York area and are looking to attend a bootcamp to become a web developer, this is where you want to go. 

  • Great Place
    - 3/10/2017
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    The instructors are amazing! You spend a lot of working on projects and have fun doing it with awesome people.

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    First of all, I can definitely say that Fullstack provided me with everything, and more, to land a coding job and be a successful coder. A power-packed curriculum taught by brilliant profs, plus an extensive and innovative course on having great coding interviews, landed me a job very soon after graduation. But many other coding schools can teach you similar things. What sets Fullstack apart is the sheer personal attention and supportive, friendly environment they create. I'm still in touch with so many alumni and the team at the campus and everyone looks out for each other. It's not one of those schools that spits you out, lands you a job, and forgets you, in other words. You're always a part of it. If that's what you're looking for I highly recommend it.

  • Anonymous • Student
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    I don't have much to add here to all the great reviews.  I had a great time in the program and really enjoyed every aspect of it.  

    My favorite parts:

    - The other people in my cohort were all super-sharp.  You could tell in admissions that Fullstack isn't messing around when they let in people for the program.

    - The curriculum is really fun and up-to-date. They were shifting to React and Redux and I really liked how they presented it.  I've done lots of online tutorials and found that Fullstack's curriculum really is well-presented.

    - The instructors are some really cool people.  I felt they were supportive and always had good insight into how to do something better.

    Some things I wished I would have known before the program:

    - The job search is tough - they keep telling you that but when you do it, it's a lot of "nos" all the time.  You have to really get used to that - I wish I had kept up more with my cohortmates and kept working together afterwards.

    - They have a cool set of classes on Saturdays around CS topics.  I liked them but you feel a bit burned out going to class 6 days a week.  They should consider making those more optional.

    - Sometimes you get to choose who you get to work with like on the final project.  That can be rough if you don't get along with your team and our cohort had some teams that seemed to have drama.

    All in all - Fullstack helped me do what I set out to do - I'm sitting in a new programming job now and it's amazing - I really can't believe how far I've come in the last six months.  If you're willing to put in the work then this is a fun and fast path to a new coding career.

  • poor organization
    - 12/4/2016
    Anonymous • Student
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    I had very high hopes for Fullstack. I took their techincal test and got through to the interview. After that, things rapidly declined and I became very frustrated with their team.

    After the second interview I took their bootcamp prep course, which was poorly organized. The lessons were straightforward enough but MANY of the example questions did not match the lectures in terms of content and those that did, were on a completly different level than the lecture examples. The TAs that assisted each session had no clue what was going on. The instructors themselves were recent graduates- and while their efforts were commendable, they couldn't quite make up for the awful course. Not to mention the course is $3k. Hack Reactor offers a prep course for $800, and they are on par in terms of rigor! I would not recommend FS!!

    After finishing their bootcamp prep I did the reassesment and their admissions team ignored it. The message they give to applications is that they are disorganized and don't care. It is exteremely frustrating to 'work' with them. They are VERY SLOW to respond if they do at all. Additionally, their cohorts have burgeoned to about 40 students each, and they have not been able to handle that expansion well. Previous reviewers/graduates have not experienced the new FS, which is falling very short of their reputation.

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    Deciding among a handful of competitive coding bootcamps was a really difficult decision, but I'm thrilled I chose to attend Fullstack Academy. The whole staff has done an incredible job of creating a culture of curiosity and collaboration in which students grow an unbelievable amount in just a few months. The program is definitely not designed for people who haven't already learned the basics on their own or through a beginner course, or who aren't committed to really pushing themselves day in and day out for an extended period of time. For anyone looking for something more than simple online tutorials to help them get to the next level though, it's hard to imagine a better option than Fullstack.

    The curriculum at Fullstack is constantly evolving based on student and employer feedback to stay up to date and to get better with every cohort. The fact that they teach full-stack JavaScript is an important difference, since it allows you to learn a single language deeply without suffering from the context switching of having to learn a couple languages at once, and also because JavaScript has a great online community and a huge, growing ecosystem built around it. The best thing by far about Fullstack though is the people. I was consistently amazed not only by the intelligence of the other students in my cohort, but also by the lack of ego, competitiveness, or negativity. Spending so much time surrounded by brilliant, motivated people helped push me to grow at a pace I couldn't have achieved otherwise. My cohort's instructors were also some of the best teachers I've ever had in any context. They're incredibly smart, knowledgeable people who are clearly passionate about what they teach, and probably even more passionate about teaching. I was always highly satisfied with the level of support I got from everyone on the staff, and I felt comfortable asking whenever I needed help with anything.

    If you're considering Fullstack, try to talk to someone who's been through the program to get a better sense of what the day to day is like and how they feel about their experience now. Going through the immersive program has undoubtedly been one of the best, most rewarding experiences I've enjoyed in my whole life, and I'm so grateful I found it.

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    The course curriculum is great. Within the time provided I learned quite a bit about MEAN stack development. Being in the flex class I had the feeling they were having issues scaling up. 

    After every cohort they will hire a handful of TAs to help out - unfortunately the majority will only be around to support the full-time class. As a flex-immersive student you will be missing out on extra activities, CS Saturdays, a few CTO lectures, and communications. 

    Flex came across as a bit disorganized at times. Sometimes forgetting to schedule a TA to help, little to no handholding, and not being allowed to use campus facilities outside of our normally scheduled class-time. This last piece was particularly stressful during capstone phase. Speaking to students in the FT cohort, no such decree against coming to campus outside of normal hours was given. 

    Another major difference between FT and Flex. TAs will act as a project manager and code reviewer for each capstone team. For someone just starting out- this is extremely valuable.

    Job support is okay. If you don't find a job at the first hiring day, don't expect much help after. You'll not be able to come to future hiring days. Occasionally you'll get a check in to see how the job search is going, with much of the framework for what you need to do  provided. Speaking to GH alumni, the job support experience sounds very different. Perhaps this is because rather then being paid up front, they get a cut of the first year salary.

    In summary, the course work was great, and the teachers helpful. However, if you want the full experience - go with fulltime and avoid flex. If you are already very confident of your ability- flex is viable. Perhaps you are already a developer? If so, flex seems to be a great stepping stone into a new tech stack. 

  • full time only
    - 6/17/2016
    Anonymous • Web Developer • Graduate
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    I did Fullstack's flex program (nights and weekends) and would not recommend it.

    I would recommend Fullstack Academy.

    • The instructors are great. They're all knowlegable and nice folks.
    • You're learning node. Node.js is, in my opinion, a better language to learn than ruby on rails, which a lot of other bootcamps teach. Node does a better job of handling single-page-applications, which is where tech is headed. Also, if you know node, you know both frontend and backend.
    • The cirriculum is good. It's not great, but I doubt any of the other options are better, unless you spend the time to go and get a degree. There is only so much you can learn in three months (or 6 months part time).

    That being said, avoid the flex program. I did the flex program, and I felt like the red-headed stepchild of FSA.

    • First of all, you don't get as much. There is less classroom time than the fulltime program. They tell you that you're supposed to review on your own of the off days, but if you're doing flex you probably have a job (and a life) and don't have a lot of extra time.
    • There are significantly fewer resources available to you, simply because everybody has gone home. By the time you get there, the instructors/staff have already put in 9+ hours and are ready to leave. So you don't have the ability to get that extra insight/different viewpoint.
    • There are a lot of great things that FSA offers, like guest lectures and hackathons, but they all happen during the day. If you can make it, great, but if you have a job you're outta luck
    • They just don't cover as much. This goes back to the classroom hours. I heard from a graduate who went on to be a teaching fellow that the fulltime class went deeper into the material because they had the time to really jump in.
    • And they charge you the same amount. If I had paid less for the flex, I wouldn't be upset because I would have gotten what I paid for. But no, it's that same hefty price tag for a fraction of the experience.

     

    TLDR: Fullstack good; flex program bad.

Thanks!