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Lambda School

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Lambda School

Avg Rating:4.34 ( 88 reviews )

Lambda School is an online coding bootcamp that teaches both a full-time, 9-month program and a part-time, 18-month program. This immersive online school is dedicated to teaching the most cutting-edge and in-demand technologies focused around JavaScript. Students will learn front end, back end, mobile, and neural network technologies. Their online classroom experience is the same as any physical classroom, live students, live instructors, full interaction, pair programming, and frequent code reviews. Their online, immersive format allows you to be connected to instructors at all times, chat with other students, or have someone instantly jump in to see your code.

Before starting a full-time course, applicants must complete a 2-week free intro course to learn the basics. After passing some test assignments, applicants are invited for an interview with a school representative.

Lambda School is committed to helping students find employment by providing interview preparation, portfolio review, effective resume writing tips, and salary negotiation practice. Lambda School offers an Income Sharing Agreement where students start paying for the program after they find a job. 

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  • Data Science

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    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$0
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationOnline
    With 26% annual growth, Data Science continues to top emerging job lists year after year. Building on centuries of statistics and mathematics, Data Science uses computational techniques to help the most innovative companies in the world scale. From self-driving cars to dynamic business insights for Fortune 500 Companies, Data Science is changing the world. If you enjoy mathematics and love using data to make decisions, a career in data science could be for you. Lambda School's Data Science program is an intensive online training for a career in applied statistics and machine learning. Our curriculum covers the following topics and more: - Python - SQL - Data Visualization - Machine Learning - Linear Algebra - Databases - Statistics & Modeling - Natural Language Processing
    Financing
    Deposit$0 down (No deposit, no down payment)
    Tuition PlansNo upfront payment required. Pay 17% of your income for 24 months (up to $30K) after getting a job making at least $50,000.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBasic Python and algebra
    Prep WorkPre-course work will be sent after acceptance to the program
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Full Stack Web Development

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    MongoDB, HTML, Git, JavaScript, CSS, React.js, Data Structures, Algorithms, Node.js, SQL, Python
    OnlineFull Time40 Hours/week36 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$0
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationOnline
    As a developer, you get to be the person that translates your passion into a functional website or web application to share with the world. A rapidly changing technological landscape means the industry continues to grow quickly, and is expected to grow by at least 13% in the next decade, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While many of those jobs are located in major tech hubs like San Francisco and New York City, the widespread need for developers across all industries means there’s likely a job waiting for you wherever you want to live. And if you’ve got persistence, grit, curiosity, and a brain that likes to solve puzzles, full stack web development could be the career for you. Lambda School's Full Stack Web Development is an immersive, online program to prepare you for a successful career in web development that teaches: - JavaScript - HTML - CSS - Node - React - Python - Redux - SQL
    Financing
    Deposit$0 down (no deposit, no down payment).
    Tuition PlansNo upfront payment required. Pay 17% of your income for 24 months (up to $30K) after getting a job making at least $50,000.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBasic JavaScript
    Prep WorkPre-course work is sent after acceptance to the program
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes

Shared Review

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    as of this year and a small part of the end of 2020 everything you read in other reviews with one star is true. the curriculum is changed and you have no say in it and youre stuck with your ISA. they got rid of a lot of resources and give you youtube videos to teach yourself. the lectures are ok but are very fast paced. everything bad i could say has already been said below in other reviews and its 100% true. However i will say that from previous students that have completed the program they have gotten a job failry quickly. basically if you already know full stack web in React.js and a little bit of python they can help you get a job for 30k. im pulling out of the program and am going to continue teaching myself. in the future ill attend an in person bootcamp or just go get my bachelors in CS looks like theyre moving over to python anyway which they dont cover in a lot of bootcamps. good luck! wouldnt recommend lambda if youre a complete beginner!
  • Jessica Fuller  User Photo
    Jessica Fuller • Student Verified via GitHub
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     After I was a few Units in (3) and thus financially obligated to pay the ISA, they removed core components of the program. There are no more assigned team leads. There are no more standups with your classmates so you can discuss the same project and see the many different ways to approach a solution. There is no more 1 on 1 review of your work. Where a mentor was paid to mentor you, you are now forced to mentor other students and vice versa. I've never heard from my mentor. You grade your own work. There is no attendance. I signed up for 18 months of programming, choosing Lambda especially because of the length of time of the program that was advertised. They suddenly reduced it to 12 months. As of yesterday, I've withdrawn after 4 months as this is not the program that was sold to me. I completed 22% of the program I thought I was signing up for, but under their new reduction, they said I owe 37% withdrawing before Unit 4. People in my cohort don't even understand basic Javascript and I'm not faring much better. I'm nowhere ready for a job. Now I have to find an education elsewhere and probably teach myself because now I don't trust boot camps. 
  • Sean  User Photo
    Sean • Student Verified via GitHub
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    The first month or two of Lambda is good and has a lot of useful information, but the moment your ISA takes effect and you owe them money the curriculum goes downhill fast. The morning material is useless and teaches you practically nothing. The instructors have absolutely not experience with teaching which makes for a bad learning experience. Just because someone knows how to code, doesn't mean that they can teach someone else how to code. 

    The majority of the time I have to refer to third-party sources to learn that day's topics. I understand that they can't teach everything, but the amount of "information" they provide is not worth the price tag that comes along with it.

    TL:DR: You'll get more bang for you buck if you just pay for udemy courses or go to frontendmasters.com and take their lessons. 
    Lambda: $30,000
    Udemy/Frontendmasters: A few hundred at most
  • Catherine  User Photo
    Catherine • Student Verified via GitHub
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    Lambda has changed how things are done!
    All the reviews here prior to 10/2020 are for something far different then the current set up. 

    I think it is important to understand how drastically the changes have devalue Lambda for myself and others.  

    When I started Lambda my schedule for each sprint looked like so:
    • 1 Hour of ‘fluff’ Career Readiness
    • 8 hours guided projects / instruction 
    • 10 hours work on project time  
    • 2.5 hours 1 on 1 code review
    • 3 hours self-guided study
    • 2 hours Stand Up Meetings with TL group
    • 3 hours test project time

    The workflow was great.  Every project I did was looked at and graded by a Team Lead (more advanced students employed by Lambda). At the end of every “work on project day” I had a stand up meeting. These meetings were led by the same Team Lead I did 1 on 1’s with as well as some other students in my group.  These meetings allowed for us to share our projects, ask questions, share roadblocks (as well as if and how we got around them) and other opportunities. 

    They have change the schedule for each sprint to this:
    • 1 Hour of ‘fluff’ Career Readiness
    • 1.5 Hours of ‘fluff’ 100% Student Ran “Track Team” meetings (More on this later)
    • 8 hours guided projects / instruction 
    • 10.5 hours work on project time  
    • 3.5 hours self-guided study
    • 3 hours test project time
    • 2 hours Mentor Meeting time (on this later)

    Let’s talk about “Track Teams”.  
    Track teams replaced “TL groups”.  Track teams are 100% student run.  Students have “ jobs” within the team that would match real life roles in a dev team.  The idea sounds great. Until you realize no one shows up and the ‘work’ is un-inspiring. 
    Track team meetings moved focus from learning from others on your level to doing busy work with people at all levels of study so you can “get to know each other”.  

    Example meeting if it went perfect:
    • Everyone joins a zoom 
    • Independent Reading (10 minutes) 
    • Independent Reading, yes again (10 minutes)
    • Discussion (10 Minutes)

    The readings on this assignment focused on how to ask and answer questions. “What makes a good question?” as well as an article from Harvard Business Review. This pattern of joining a zoom meeting, reading to yourself for 20 minutes, and chatting about the article you just read for 10 minutes is the basic pattern to these meetings.  Overall they swapped out being able to reinforce your learning with a group of your peers to read to yourself in a zoom meeting about soft skill topics that, while somewhat important, should not take up so much of our time. 

    Now about that 2 hours of Mentor meeting time
    Lambda stopped employing students as TLs and shifted 100% of that job on to students.  You as a student grade 100% of your own work. It is not looked at by anyone at lambda at any time. This was confirmed by a member of the student success team via e-mail.  Lambda states that:

     “With your peer mentor, you’ll talk through projects, practice technical interview skills, and get 1:1 support from someone further along in their Lambda journey.”

    The idea is great, but implemented poorly.  People that are mentoring right now are forced into it. It was not part of the program when they signed up.  My assigned mentor has never once contacted me. I have reported this on every form asking about the experience.  No one looks at these forms … so no one knows. When I expressed my disappointment I was told to submit a ticket.  Why are we filling out these forms then? Why am I paying 30k to have to chase down things I am paying for?

    More changes… less technical education
    Lambda recently changed the end of the technical education replacing it with more career development . They also chopped the computer science portion of learning in half.  Instructors went from knowledgeable and well prepared to excuses and error filled guided projects. The first words I hear you say as an instructor should not be something to the effect of “I don't use this stuff so I'm not sure what I'm doing”. 

    We used to have schedules for “office” hours. These are no longer part of the program. 

    I feel like I could go on and on. But, it boils down to this… 

    You can learn all this stuff online. Watching a YouTube video is not much different than a “live" guided project. You can ask questions in a live zoom for 30k or the YouTube comments for free. Both ways have the same chance of being answered correctly in a way you can understand. Actually with the quality of Lambda instructors… YouTube offers edited videos so it is probably better. 

    You are self grading all your work based on how you “feel” you did. Lambda calls this “holistic” grading.  You can grade yourself for free. Any other reason to pay has been done away with. 

    Also with a reduced length/quality why not a price reduction?

     



  • Samuel Rowan  User Photo
    Samuel Rowan • Student Verified via GitHub
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    If you would have asked me about the school before the overhaul I would have rated it highly and recommended it.  Once you had TLs and a small group of 10 or fewer students that would help you along the way and could help push you and give you tips etc. Now they don't have TLs or TL groups at all.  You are pretty much left to go at it on your own and good luck if you need any help with anything.  Save yourself some money and go through a couple Udemy courses or maybe Zero To Mastery or something like that.  Because you will get a similar experience to lambda going through Zero To Mastery and you will save yourself a lot of money and quite possibly come out knowing more than a Lambda grad.
  • John Michaels  User Photo
    John Michaels • Student Verified via GitHub
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    The course was questionable to begin with. This is a bootcamp who produced web developers - their "training kit" was nothing more than a semi-organized dump of YouTube videos and links to free third-party resources. Nearly every instructor would say, at some point during their class, "You should really take this Udemy course to really understand the material." And it's true - there was simply no time, in the complete disorganization of the course, to dig deep into topics. It was just useless daily project after useless daily project.

    My Team Lead (a fellow student hired to be a teaching assistant, essentially) was only given one week (!) to familiarize himself with Java - a full-time course topic that is supposed to take a month, and STILL culminates in "take this paid Udemy course to actually learn something" - all while he was also doing classes for his part time web dev course. The poor kid had no clue how to help most issues other than tell us to google the issue.

    And I'm cool with googling, sure. But I'm not paying someone tens of thousands of dollars for them to tell me to do stuff that I can already do for free, or through a $30 Udemy course. There is an assumption that there are instructors when they market this to you, but the truth is that there is one experienced (usually very experienced) instructor for like... 130 people. If you went to a normal school where every class was like that, office hours would be a nightmare - and that's exactly what it was like at Lambda, too. Tons of questions for instructors by confused students, making it nearly impossible to really get any good info you could trust.

    They also changed their ISA situation - sure, you still have an ISA, but they have now essentially divested themselves from the risk of ISAs by batching them into investment vehicles and getting a cut of the money up front from investors - completely going back on the whole logic of "we don't get paid unless you do". Nah, they get paid. Yay derivatives! Nothing bad ever happens with THOSE!

    And the latest changes are a nightmare. Hey students, is it already not insulting enough to go through the above? Well, guess what!? Let's get rid of TLs, and now YOU can be an UNPAID INTERN MENTOR! Get ready to feel uncomfortable as you have to answer questions for something you haven't worked with in a while all on top of your existing coursework! What, that's hard? That's fine, we'll just take grading assessments out of the mix! Now you don't even have to work, just BS your way through!

    To top it off, in a statement directly from Austen, the "growth hacker serial entrepreneur" founder (yes, he calls himself that), it has been explained that their "hiring partners" (whoever they are - they probably meant to say "investors") aren't concerned about portfolio work. Which is funny, because since being here, we haven't worked on portfolio work yet, and the 5 recruiters I have talked to have asked me, "Uhh, why do you not have portfolio pieces if you've been there for that long?"

    To which I would have to reply... "Uhh, because my bootcamp's 'hiring partners' say they don't matter..?"

    Anyway, I've dropped the course, subsequently, and am now working on stuff that I should have been working on this entire time - actual portfolio work to show recruiters/employers/hiring managers. I have a bit of experience working as a dev previously and I was hoping this place would really get me to tighten up my skills, but I could have googled for better - and far cheaper - resources. And after the changes, there is literally nothing this place has that you can't get through a dev discord server or slack channel, a couple Udemy/coursera courses, and free projects and github repos online.

    I am SO pissed that I am locked into (most of) the ISA. I would never have joined this had I known this is the end result. I did expect more, and in hindsight I know a lot, but there was no way I could have expected it from the start and from the (completely different) course they provided a while ago when I was looking at reviews.

    Hard pass, now.

    This place is a garbage fire about to go under. Avoid at all costs. Their most recent changes are a clear indicator that they are just trying to make a super cheap model of pumping people through at little cost to the company, so that the handful of people who would have gotten a job anyway can make their investors a return by getting placed at a FAANG. Go buy 10 $30 Udemy courses, you'll spend a ton less and actually learn something, instead of proving to yourself that you can just cram enough that you forget it by next week when you're on to something totally different, and getting stuck trying to help a poor kid a month behind you work on something you don't even remember while you don't get paid for your effort.
  • Mountain Scott  User Photo
    Mountain Scott • Lifelong Student • Student • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Before you continue reading I must state that one should be suspicious of the predominantly positive ratings about Lambda School on this platform because it is biased towards individuals asked to complete reviews after finding employment.  People who have bad experiences may not even bother finding review sites like these and posting on them.  Also, I can assure you that the signals of the internal level of satisfaction with Lambda from students (based on comments by students within the platform on Slack suggest a significantly lower true approval rating).

    About a year ago a Lambda graduate wrote a reddit post that criticized Lambda School (henceforth "Lambda") for:
    • cohort size
    • inflating positive PR by encouraging students to say good things about LS on social media platforms
    • not having a proven track record (due to the Lambda's relative youth compared to, e.g., App Academy)
    This post was followed by a comment that said the real problem was:
    • Negative students stirring up trouble
    • Over-reliance on a "teaching you how to learn" Motto
    This is by no means the only reddit post that says less than pleasant things about Lambda, but it's likely the top one if one Googles something like "should I join lambda school?". I won't agree or disagree with any of the statements in that linked post, but I think it forms a useful backdrop for my critique of the Lambda School Data Science program.
    The purpose of my post is to offer a review of Lambda School that is 1) specific to the Data Science program and 2) not constricted within the heavily-curated official Lambda subreddit. When I wanted to join the Lambda DS program, there were very few useful reviews (most were web-dev-centric), so I hope I can help others who are researching the program.
    ----------------------------
     Last year around this time Udacity did a major overhaul to its pricing structure that made it no longer an affordable option for me to use to pursue a career in data science (DS). I went on a google search to find cheaper alternatives and I found a reddit post about the Udacity price hike in which one of the commenters said something to the effect that Udacity's new pricing would make schools like Lambda more popular for career training. I Googled "Lambda School" and was sold on the length of the program, the topics covered, and the income share agreement (ISA) that would allow me to defer tuition costs until after I found a job paying $50,000 or more in a relevant tech field.
    I considered the length of the program (7-9 months) good because I personally would be more convinced about someone saying they obtained a certain skill set from a 7-9 month program than from a 3-month program (which is a common time period for many bootcamps). I liked that the program would spend a lot of time on statistics (4 weeks) instead of only introducing it as part of the EDA on an otherwise Machine-learning focused curriculum. I don't have any links to post you may see a lot of complaining online about DS education not being stats-focused. I appreciated the attempt at spending more time on the subject. Lastly, the ISA meant I went from allocating a budget for a lower-cost version of Udacity to a free-for-now (deferred cost) program, which allowed me to use that money to pay off my apartment lease for one year. This was advantageous since fulltime Lambda programs are time intensive (11 to 7 EST, in theory, but 11-9pm EST in reality)--so not not much time to earn an income (few jobs would be down for working around a schedule like that anyway, FME).Good things about the Lambda Data Science Program:
    1. The Slack-based Learning Platform: Lambda school has a student dashboard webpage that may have been made to be the source of knowledge/information, but everything really goes down in the Slack app. While the instructor is teaching via Zoom, you can ask questions on Slack that can be answered by the instructor (more on this later) or answered by other students. Questions and comments are then visible and can be pinned to the Slack Channel for future reference. For anyone who has experienced the asynchronous "discussion board" layout of many online learning institutions (I have), knows the value of a synchronous learning environment. A good instructor will make excellent use of the to ability communicate with students while teaching by asking and answering questions, creating polls (including anonymous ones), and interacting positively by liking/adding emojis to certain comments. The emoji thing may seem trivial but the more interaction the better and an approval signals to others what is the "best answer".
    2. The chance to interact with people who are in different stages oflearningandemployment. A Lambda Student will be assigned to a group with is led by a team lead (TL) who is former Lambda student who is still on the job hunt. They are not DS experts yet, but they have the potential to provide useful perspectives and even learn more themselves (as a lot can be learned by teaching). As a lambda DS student, you will also have access to Slack channels where students in other cohorts (ahead of and behind your own cohort) discuss various DS-related topics. Students who secure employment can remain active in communal Slack channels after securing employment.
    Also, you can actually talk to real Data Scientist during weekly "Brown Bag" Lunch presentations from guest experts. I personally never had time to attend a "Brown bag" session (and I don't see how a serious student could have such time, but the brown bags do exist).
    I suppose all of 2) still ties into the fact that Slack is used as the main hub for Lambda school and so one can avail of all the features Slack offers.
    3. The openness of administration to conversations about improvements to Lambda. There is a particular Slack Channel called "announcements" in which a new change/service is announced, and students can respond to it in a related channel called "announcement threads". An outsider would be shocked at the kinds of conversations that happen here in which students to varying levels of zeal, express how they feel about an actual or potential change. Administrators are exposed to a level of criticism that one can't help sympathize with but a lot is learned in the process. Also students (including grad) can and will offer criticism about specifically the DS curriculum in relevant slack channels. They are often a fun read after getting through a day of hard work.
    So far so good, right? Ready to enroll? Not so fast...
    Bad things about the Lambda Data Science Program:
    One might note that the benefits of Slack are more or less independent of Lambda School's educational quality. Meaning, putting a bad driver in a Lamborghini doesn't make them a good driver, but they will have more options and might be more motivated to learn to become a good driver (why let such a good vehicle go to waste?)
    1. Admissions: It becomes apparent very quickly that not all students completed or understood the assignments that are supposed to be completed prior to being accepted into a cohort. I won't delve too heavily into this subject because such criticism about Lambda are echoed elsewhere. I do want to clarify, however, that my issue with whether or not a student was "smart" enough to be a part of the program. Instead, my issue is with, how at the very beginning, they did not demonstrate level of effort needed to be part of an intensive educational program. I don't care if they have to complete the precourse work five times, make them do it until they pass, and it can be certain that someone who constantly failed the precourse work, but stuck through it
    2. Poorly evaluating students who in the program: Once students are in the program, they still are susceptible to being passed through even if their understanding is low or work is mediocre. The problems with this is the same as those mentioned in 1)
    3. Confusing "Expert" with "Teacher"
    The Lambda DS program, at the time of this post, has an energetic, interactive teacher, Ryan A., who teaches Unit 1. He makes full use of the synchronous learning environment that slack provides. Ryan stays on topic (or keeps his tangents short), constantly asks questions to check for understanding, creates comprehensive end-of-week exams that are sufficiently more difficult than the daily assignments (so you're not just copying and pasting and editing), and consistently makes himself available to video conference Q&A sessions during the time allotted for completing the daily assignment. It's true that he's a data scientist, but through either talent or effort has confirmed that he is a teacher as well.
    I won't bother calling out any names about the teachers that proceed Ryan A., but I can promise you that the learning experience after Ryan is a downhill tumble stemming mostly from the fact that there doesn't seem to be any standardized protocols or metrics for judging how well a teacher has performed except for feedback forms on which, one a week, ask you to rate your instructor and leave a comment if you wish.
    You will see a lot talk about how the CS section of Lambda school kills off a lot of students...many students attribute the problem to the curriculum. I can't speak for the other programs but the CS section the DS program (unit 3) doesn't have a curriculum problem, it has a teacher problem. I have no doubt the teacher in question has a CV that qualifies him for the role of "data scientist", but his level of interaction with students, ability to seek out gaps in understanding, ability to organize his allotted instructional time, eagerness to interact with students after class, ability to multitask (by looking at both slack and text editor, ability to live code instead of editing pre-coded material, ability to explain his steps as he does, ability handle criticism, are all LOW. This is the simple truth.
    The main point, even if it is against common belief, is that it is better to have a person with mediocre domain expertise who is a good teacher than an "expert" who is a poor teacher if the chief goal of an institution is to provide others with an education (think about a manager who "knows everything" but is despised...how effective could she/he be?) . Otherwise, you might find leaning too heavily upon pedagogical philosophies of "learning how to learn" when signs point to a lack of understanding among the students/customers who are banking their future incomes on the quality of your education.
    ----------------------

    Today, I quit the DS program even though I had passed all previous assignments and could easily be in the 85% percentile of my cohort in terms of understanding the material. I personally have no patience for a consistently poor learning experience and unfortunately Lambda has its DS program setup such that the same instructors teach the same units. So, at the moment, students will continue to enter the program with a false sense of how their learning experience will continue due to either a coincidental or clever decision to make the best teacher the teacher for unit 1. I say "clever" because if you don't withdraw from Lambda within 4 weeks, you will still owe part of your future income to the company (and each unit is 4 weeks long).
    I think the potential for Lambda's DS program to garner a reputation that catches the eyes of employers is high. I speak, nevertheless, only of potential because at the moment there are some serious pedagogical concerns that need to be addressed. I might suggest something like peer training (where different teachers show how they would teach the same lesson, for example). Ideally, there would be 360 feedback (teacher to student, student to teacher, and teacher to teacher) but any attempt to be more vigilant of instructional quality would make the program not worth dropping out of. Until then, there current platform is easily replicable by those who want to also get into the DS Bootcamp industry (or those who are already in it). Recipe: Slack, Zoom, small group of instructors, and a team of administrators, and some venture capitalists. Emphasis on the Slack and Zoom.
    I hope others find this helpful and I trust Lambda will eventually improve its DS program. I like the CEO and the leader of the DS program (Aaron). They seem to have their hearts in the right place, but education first, guys.
  • Benjamin Wilson  User Photo
    Benjamin Wilson • Software Engineer • Student • Verified via LinkedIn
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    I was highly skeptical with the program in the ads. It seemed too good to be true. After enough nagging from my friend who is a designer, I started to look deeper into it, and eventually applied.

    I started classes in March of last year. I had just lost my house in my divorce. I was living with my grandma, sharing a room with my son. I started my classes on an old laptop I got from a pawn shop in my bed.

    I was a single dad who woke up at 4am every day. I'd take my son to his early entry daycare so I could start work in the warehouse at 6. After we got home I had just enough time to cook dinner and put him to bed before class started, where I'd then sit for another 3 hours and take in something entirely new.

    In November of the same year, I accepted a role as a software engineer for a university, doubling my wages. I bought my son and I another house. We got a new car. I can afford to put him in preschool instead of daycare. He has never been happier, and it really is all for him.

    Everyone will tell you, it's hard. At no point is it ever not hard. Every other day you have to learn something new and apply it, in addition to every single thing you learned before. It nearly infinitely builds upon itself. But the Lambda staff is there for you every step of the way. Your peers want you to succeed as much as they want to succeed themselves. Lambda is not for the faint hearted or the weak. Lambda is for the strong, the gritty, the determined. Lambda is for the people who not only want to do better but those who need it. The unique tuition arrangement allows people to come in at their lowest, and completely turn their life around. I am forever grateful.
  • Clint Kunz  User Photo
    Clint Kunz • Software Engineer • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Lambda School was by far the best educational experience I've had to date. It's remote, but it doesn't feel like it because you are constantly live chatting with instructors, team leads, and other classmates. I was not familiar with programming going into Lambda School, and I came out with enough knowledge and project experience to have a signed offer before I completed the program--the caveat there, is that I worked as a team lead for Lambda for almost four months during the middle of my program. Working as a team lead solidified the concepts for me and was the best choice I made. I've been working in a salaried position for about 8 months now, and I am able to consistently contribute to my company's progress. If you succeed monetarily in a career after Lambda, the bill is not cheap, but it's great that it will be paid off after two years of employment. The instructors and classmates were incredibly helpful and impressive. My opinion is that if you know you want to be a developer and you want to get there relatively quick but at the same time take no shortcuts, there is no better option than Lambda School. The pedagogy is unmatched. And one last thing, when I left Lambda it was a different school than when I started, so be okay with rapid change because Lambda is very motivated to improve.
  • Moses Robinson  User Photo
    Moses Robinson • iOS Engineer, Automation • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    I accepted an offer! I have officially increased my salary over 3x! It still doesn’t feel real.

    I used to make 30k a year and now I’ll be making over 100k! I have to say THANK YOU LAMBDA SCHOOL. THANK YOU from the deepest part of my heart. Without your vision, this wouldn’t have been possible. You’ve made a dream of mine a possibility. I was a first generation university graduate with a communications degree, and guess what? Never used it. Could be partly my fault, I wanted to make sure to “go to college,” right?
     
    But it wasn’t until a few years later that I discovered programming and fell in love and wanted to pursue it. But after my experience with loans and not being guaranteed a job afterwords put fear in my mind. What if I couldn’t do this thing I loved? What if I invested all this money on something that wasn’t going to pay back?
     
    Lambda School allowed me to pursue this dream without fear of losing my investment. It’s like they decided to take the bullet in me potentially failing. But that’s it, they did not give up on me. There was definitely a point where I was going to give up, but Lambda School's Student Success was there. They consulted and calmed me down as if I were speaking to dear old friends.

    Be aware though, when they say it's a full time commitment from 8-5, it's no joke. But there is a reason for it all! Literally everything they taught us, from the programming language to what happens in the work environment, Lambda puts you through. It's funny have Sprints, retros, stand ups, code reviews, and an agile work environement that lambda just intergrates to the program. It was honestly the best decision of my life. 

    P.S. If you feel like you're going to give up, do not. You can do. Literally not giving up is all you have to do. Trust!
  • Carlos Lantigua  User Photo
    Carlos Lantigua • Software Developer • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Like many others, I've researched a lot of code schools for cost and remote options. I've looked over hundreds of reviews, youtube videos, articles and it was really difficult to choose. I actually was accepted into General Assembly and two others before I even thought about Lambda. I had a friend who graduated from there tell me that it was the best option to get me where I wanted to be so I declined the other schools and applied for Lambda. I'm going to split this in this sections in case there are parts of it that people are interested in hearing about specifically.

    The Instructors and team leads.
    I can't say enough great things about the instructors. These are not just professionals in their fields, they're also caring people that love seeing their students succeed and enjoy talking about tech outside of just the lectures. They had some of the best instructors I've ever had and were able to break down extremely difficult concepts to an understandable, easy to follow format. The TL's are half and half I think in this category. I've had some that inspired me and really went out of their way to help every student without giving away too much and I've had some that would just disappear and only wanted to collect a paycheck. I'd love it if Lambda could tighten down on their selections of TL's or replace the ones that don't want to do the work. (I'm a TL myself in the evenings).

    The Material.
    Lambda has put together what they call the "training kit" for students to review before a lecture. A lot of it is a walk through with some small project that you can follow to get yourself ahead of the material that is about to be covered for the day. This includes articles that are linked for people that want to learn more in order to understand how something truly works and videos that you can watch in case you can't read long written material. This also serves as a reference to go back to throughout the day as you're going over your project for the day or during the end of the week sprint challenges.

    The Lectures.
    The lectures start as you would expect with a "Zoom" link dropped in the cohort channel and the instructor kicking it off. Depending on the subject I've seen anything from an instructor breaking out a white board to help visualize difficult concepts in an interactive manner to opening up code pen and even getting history lessons. A lot of the times you'll have a questions thread that the instructor will keep an eye on as they go through the lectures and they'll let you know if they want you to follow along, wait until they finish coding to write things down, or just wait until the end of the lecture to see what they've done. The lectures are recorded and posted later on after they've been processed so that you can come back to them in case you missed something or needed to revisit something the instructor said.

    The Projects.
    When I first started Lambda, they only had "Project week" which was a generic project that everyone all did that was only for the sake of making sure you could do the things you were taught for that module. This has since been changed for "build week" which is a team based full stack project where you'll be responsible for doing work based on the sections that you just studied. The projects are unique from each other and extremely interesting. This teaches you about git in a team environment, communication and how to establish a proper team agile work flow. You'll generally do about 5 of these build week projects in your time at Lambda so you'll be leaving with 5 projects plus a labs project. Labs is much bigger scaled version of build week where you'll be taught about staging and test environments as well as project management skills and dive deeper into AGILE. So that is 6 full stack applications by the time you leave Lambda.

    The Job assistance.
    This has evolved many times through my time at Lambda and all for the better. Lambda provides students that complete labs a career coach that will look over your linkedin, github, resume and portfolio. Once a career coach has cleared you as ready, you gain access to their list of hiring partners. They'll also try to put you in front of those hiring partners based on your preferences as well and are always looking for new programs to put grads into that will better their chances to get hired. I got my job through a pilot program that they put me in that got me in contact directly with companies that showed an interest in me so I didn't have to hunt them down and beat out other candidates just to get an interview. 

    Pros
    Knowledgable experts teaching the courses, evolving and improving curric, lots of unique fullstack projects done in a team to buff up your experience and portfolio, huge community of people that love to help each other, really caring staff. 


    Cons
    Through the nature of changing needs of hiring partners and technologies, a lot of things will change from the time you start to the time you finish the curric. This isn't really a con to say but being a part of the "first" to go through these changes can be a bit bumpy most times. CS portion feels extremely rushed and is a lot of information to fly through on a weekly basis, I gained more of a general exposure and overview of topics than an actual hard understanding through repetition of important algorithmic strategies. 

  • Tommy  User Photo
    Tommy • Frontend Engineer • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Attending Lambda School is the best decision I have ever made in my life. Their cirriculum is well organized and relevant to the skills companies are looking for today. Their careers team is the best in the business. They find students a lot of companies to interview for. I've got friends who have gone through other bootcamps and they don't have any career help at all.

    Going through Lambda School helped me land a job at Amazon making way more than I thought I'd make for my first software engineering job. 

Thanks!