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DevMountain

Dallas, Online, Phoenix, Provo, Salt Lake City

DevMountain

Avg Rating:4.67 ( 243 reviews )

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5 Campuses

Dallas

211 N Ervay St, Dallas, Texas 75201
HTML, AngularJS, Git, CSS, JavaScript, React.js, jQuery, MongoDB, Node.js, Express.jsIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

The full-time class is the best immersive coding experience you can find. It's a world-class coding education. It's also a grind--8 or 10 or 12 hour days of instruction, 1:1 mentoring, and work. You'll live, eat, sleep, and breathe code for 12 weeks. And when you're done, you'll be a different person. This class is great for those who are serious about learning to code. If you want to code as a career, this is the place to do it. There's no better place in the country for this price to get nearly two years worth of world-class education.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.

Online

560 S 100 W STE 11, Provo, Utah 84601

Our 12-week after-hours Salesforce Developer bootcamp will prepare you with the skills needed to become a competitive candidate for junior-level Salesforce Developer and Salesforce Administrator jobs. Instruction consists of instructor lectures, guest lectures, guided projects, individual projects, group projects, and real projects with corporate clients. Students will work collaboratively with the lead instructor and mentors throughout the course. You will learn how to develop in Salesforce using Apex, Visualforce, and the new Salesforce Lightning framework. By the end of this course you will have an understanding of how the Salesforce platform works and insight into tried and true methods used to tackle common business problems. We will provide you with the skills, direction, and resources you will need to solve the most difficult business problems.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.
Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Previous development experience is preferred.
Placement Test
Yes
Prep Work
Yes.

The full-time class is the best immersive coding experience you can find and now it is available in an online format. It's a world-class coding education. You'll live, eat, sleep, and breathe code for 12 weeks. And when you're done, you'll be a different person. This class is great for those who are serious about learning to code. If you want to code as a career, this is the place to do it. There's no better place in the country for this price to get nearly two years worth of world-class education.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.
Interview
Yes
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.

Phoenix

302 N 1st Ave. Ste. 600, Phoenix, Arizona 85003

The full-time class is the best immersive coding experience you can find. It's a world-class coding education. It's also a grind--8 or 10 or 12 hour days of instruction, 1:1 mentoring, and work. You'll live, eat, sleep, and breathe code for 12 weeks. And when you're done, you'll be a different person. This class is great for those who are serious about learning to code. If you want to code as a career, this is the place to do it. There's no better place in the country for this price to get nearly two years worth of world-class education.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner

Provo

560 S. 100 W. , Provo, UT 84601
SQLIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

Our 12-week after-hours Salesforce Developer bootcamp will prepare you with the skills needed to become a competitive candidate for junior-level Salesforce Developer and Salesforce Administrator jobs. Instruction consists of instructor lectures, guest lectures, guided projects, individual projects, group projects, and real projects with corporate clients. Students will work collaboratively with the lead instructor and mentors throughout the course. You will learn how to develop in Salesforce using Apex, Visualforce, and the new Salesforce Lightning framework. By the end of this course you will have an understanding of how the Salesforce platform works and insight into tried and true methods used to tackle common business problems. We will provide you with the skills, direction, and resources you will need to solve the most difficult business problems.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Previous development experience is preferred.
Placement Test
Yes
Prep Work
Yes.
Design, User Experience DesignIn PersonPart Time11 Hours/week

Our "After Hours" course is a great way to dive into UX without having to quit your job or school. It's still extremely intense, but allows for a more flexible format. Classes are held nights and weekends. This class is great for those who are interested in UX, need some skills to better their employment options, or simply learn a new skillset.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirm and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
AngularJS, HTML, Git, jQuery, JavaScript, CSSIn PersonPart Time11 Hours/week

Our "After Hours" course is a great way to dive into code without having to quit your job or school. It's still extremely intense, but allows for a more flexible format. Classes are held nights and weekends. This class is great for those who are interested in coding, need some skills to better their employment options, or simply learn a new skillset.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirm and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.
jQuery, AngularJS, Git, CSS, HTML, JavaScript, Express.js, MongoDB, React.js, Node.jsIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

The full-time class is the best immersive coding experience you can find. It's a world-class coding education. It's also a grind--8 or 10 or 12 hour days of instruction, 1:1 mentoring, and work. You'll live, eat, sleep, and breathe code for 12 weeks. And when you're done, you'll be a different person. This class is great for those who are serious about learning to code. If you want to code as a career, this is the place to do it. There's no better place in the country for this price to get nearly two years worth of world-class education.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.

Salt Lake City

120 S. Main Street , Salt Lake City, UT 84101
Xcode, iOS, Objective-C, Swift, Mobile, Design, User Experience DesignIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

Want to build iOS (iPhone/iPad) apps? There is no better place to learn. You'll start building apps on Day 1 of the class, and by the end you'll have at least one app in the App Store (possibly even making you money). Classes are rigorous, and previous programming experience is definitely preferred, but if you're up to the challenge, you can become a great iOS developer with a start in this course.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Programming experience preferred, beginners welcome
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.
AngularJS, GitIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

Our 6-week immersive software QA bootcamp will prepare you with the skills needed to become a competitive candidate for junior-level software QA engineer positions. Instruction consists of instructor lectures, guest lecturers, guided projects, individual projects, group projects, and real projects with corporate clients. Students will work collaboratively with the lead instructor and mentors throughout the course. Through experience in specific technologies and frameworks that are popular today, students can achieve a flexible outlook that is comfortable and eager to tackle new technologies in a fast-moving and ever-changing industry.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.
Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.
Design, User Experience Design, Product ManagementIn PersonFull Time40 Hours/week

If you're a designer, product person, developer, or simply interested in taking a dive into UX (user experience), this class is for you. Our "Immersive" full-time UI/UX course makes the most of class time because we focus on less theory and more hands-on practice. You're probably already doing some UX whether you know it or not and this course will help you give structure to your innate thoughts through industry know how and structured design processes. The design course at DevMountain is multi-faceted, covering all aspects of the design process from start to finish. While covering both mobile and web design principles students will practice creative discovery, ideation, critical thinking, research collection, wireframing / prototyping, basic front-end coding and more design best practices. The class will teach students to understand and meet modern web and mobile design standards in the product creation process, from first pondering user centered design and design thinking principles to testing their products on multiple devices and measuring the effectiveness of their designs. Students will also learn design principles such as grid systems, typography, color theory, branding and systems-based design, design history and research methods. By the end of the 13-week course, the new designers will graduate with a well-rounded portfolio of work that shows everything they have learned and can achieve in the workplace. This class is great for those who are interested in UX, need some skills to better their employment options, or simply learn a new skillset. The course will prepare students to step into a variety of design roles: web designer, mobile designer, UX designer, UI designer, front-end designer, freelance designer, and more.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Yes.
AngularJS, jQuery, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, GitIn PersonPart Time11 Hours/week

Our "After Hours" course is a great way to dive into code without having to quit your job or school. It's still extremely intense, but allows for a more flexible format. Classes are held nights and weekends. This class is great for those who are interested in coding, need some skills to better their employment options, or simply learn a new skillset.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with Skills FundClimbEarnestAffirm, PaveUpstart and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.

The full-time class is the best immersive coding experience you can find. It's a world-class coding education. It's also a grind--8 or 10 or 12 hour days of instruction, 1:1 mentoring, and work. You'll live, eat, sleep, and breathe code for 12 weeks. And when you're done, you'll be a different person. This class is great for those who are serious about learning to code. If you want to code as a career, this is the place to do it. There's no better place in the country for this price to get nearly two years worth of world-class education.

Course Details

Financing
DevMountain has partnerships with ClimbEarnestAffirmSkillsFund, and WeFinance.

Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Beginner
Prep Work
Once accepted, students must complete pre-course work before first day of class.

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Our latest on DevMountain

  • 8 Steps to Minimize Your Coding Bootcamp Debt

    Rachel Seitz6/12/2018

    8-steps-to-minize-coding-bootcamp-loan-debt-with-climb-credit

    If you’re planning to take out a loan to pay for your coding bootcamp tuition, READ THIS FIRST. Borrowing money can be confusing and stressful, but there are a number of ways to make sure your debt doesn’t pile up more quickly than you were expecting. The team at Climb Credit, a student lender focused on career-building education, drew from their experience working with bootcamp students to put together this list of ways to be smart about your loan, and avoid accruing unmanageable debt by the time you graduate.

    Continue Reading →
  • Alumni Spotlight: Sterling Chin of DevMountain

    Lauren Stewart5/11/2018

    Sterling Chin wanted to become a developer, but with a wife and two kids to support, he couldn’t justify going back to college so he enrolled at DevMountain coding bootcamp in Provo, Utah. Learning to code was very difficult for Sterling, but he worked hard and became a DevMountain student mentor. Sterling tells us how he overcame feelings of anxiety, depression, and imposter syndrome to land a job at a startup for 3 months after graduation, and then as a Front End Developer at Overstock, the biggest tech company in Utah!

    Q&A

    What’s your education and career background? What made you want to switch careers into software development?

    I studied Elementary Education and teaching at Brigham Young University, but I wasn’t sure that’s what I wanted to do for a career. I took a one-year hiatus from college, which turned into 10 years. In that time, I worked in a handful of different industries including construction, facilities, vendor, and project management. Two years before DevMountain, I started to interact regularly with developers in a business setting. As I got to know those developers, they would explain things to me. I realized that if I could get a more in-depth understanding of what was going on, I might be able to do this as a full-time job. That experience got me thinking about going back to school. Also, when I joined another company and started working with HTML and CSS, I realized that there's a whole better world out there and I needed to move into software development.

    What made you choose a bootcamp as a way to hone your skills? Did you consider getting a 4-year CS degree?

    Originally, I was going to go back to a local university to get a computer science degree. But during my hiatus, I got married and had a child. I couldn't take two or three years to go back to school, so I started moving towards other options.

    I learned about coding bootcamps through my network. A friend who is a software developer mentioned that his company had hired coding bootcamp grads. That was the first time I'd heard of a bootcamp as an alternative to a traditional university. That’s when I started doing my research. I went to Course Report, I read Google reviews, I looked at YouTube videos, just about everything, and came across DevMountain.

    What stood out about DevMountain compared to other bootcamps in Utah?

    One of the main factors was the culture. I toured the DevMountain campus in Provo, and thought the faculty was amazing. I sat down with the recruiters and some of the past and current students, and what I read online is what I saw in-person. The DevMountain staff answered all of my questions. That made a big difference to me. I'd visited two other bootcamps where the staff couldn’t give clear answers when I asked harder hitting questions like, "What's the attrition rate? How many of your graduates actually find jobs within a certain amount of time?" DevMountain had those answers and they were very honest with me.

    Another reason why I chose DevMountain was that their name is well-known locally in Provo, Utah. There are a lot of companies that have good relationships with DevMountain, so I felt confident in my ability to find a job after the bootcamp. When you're going to shell out $10,000 to $20,000 for school, and you have a family, you have to be 100% sure this is what you want to do. I felt comfortable giving DevMountain my money.

    Describe your DevMountain cohort. Was it diverse in terms of career and backgrounds?

    There were multiple different backgrounds in my cohort. There was a wide age range – I'm in my mid 30's and there was someone who had just barely graduate high school at 18. There were a lot of different levels of education, and I was definitely not the only one who had attended a four-year college, graduated or not, and needed something different. There was one kid who was in college at the time but took a semester off to come to DevMountain.

    Describe a typical day at DevMountain. What was the learning experience like?

    I'm in my mid-30s and I could not fail at this. I wasn’t going to waste $10,000 to $20,000 by not working my ass off. So I’d wake up at 6am and spend two to three hours studying before class. Then at night, I'd continue studying or I'd read up on the next day's topics. I averaged about 14 to 16 hours a day studying at DevMountain.

    Class started at 9:30am and the first thing we’d have was a problem to solve or a meeting with our mentor and other students to go over topics that we needed cover. Then from 10am to 12pm, we had a lecture. The lectures were really nice, and fast, because there was a lot of coding involved and I did a lot of notetaking. At noon we had lunch, then in the afternoon, we'd practice what we learned that morning. If we studied JavaScript arrays in the morning, we were practicing JavaScript arrays that afternoon.  You have classwork for the first six weeks and then the next six weeks is all project-based.

    DevMountain allowed you to immediately practice what you learned, and that application of learning is something that I never had when I was in college. In college, you have a whole day of lectures in five different subjects, with a lot of reading and superficial knowledge – no real practical knowledge. DevMountain really is a bootcamp – it was nonstop. We've all heard the phrase drinking from a firehose – well, it felt like fire hoses were coming at me from every direction. And I wasn't just drinking it, I was getting pelted from all sides.

    Did you become a student mentor at DevMountain after graduation? What made you take on this teaching role?

    Yes, I did. I really struggled with JavaScript concepts in the pre-course work so I knew coming in that this was going to be harder than anything I'd ever done. From day one I felt behind. Once I found out about the mentorship aspect of the program, I made it my personal goal to push myself to do my best. I decided that if I was picked to become a Mentor then my experience at DevMountain had been worth it, it would be a sign that I had done everything that DevMountain had expected of me, and I had succeeded. Thankfully, I got the mentorship position. Doing that further solidified my capabilities and knowledge because I was teaching it – I had to know JavaScript, HTML, CSS, Node, and Angular to be able to teach it to others. Having been a mentor also helped me with getting into my new career.

    How did DevMountain prepare you for job hunting?

    The career preparation starts a week before you graduate. A member of the DevMountain careers team talks about creating a personal website and portfolio. We got help with writing tech industry-based resumes and we did a full day about Linkedin – how to search for jobs, what types of jobs to look for, how to reach out to people, and how to network with people.

    DevMountain did as much as they could within the time that was given. The resources that DevMountain provided and the skills they helped me build were valuable. But part of the reason I was successful was luck and the amount of time that I put in reaching out to people, talking to everybody, and applying for hundreds of jobs. I got really lucky when I landed my first job because the company that I went to was a startup and they had good experiences with DevMountain grads. I just happened to be in the right place at the right time and ended up landing an interview.

    What advice do you have for current bootcampers on the job search?

    Don't give up. Don't give up the hard work. And don't give up after a couple of weeks if you don't have any interviews. It may take you some time, but this is not a foot race. This is not a race with anyone but yourself. You can do this! You have to keep studying, keep learning, and networking. Don't give up on your dream if it doesn't come to you right away.

    It's a full-time job finding a job after bootcamp. It was 40+ hours a week where I was doing tech interviews and technical problems that companies were sending me, while also pushing myself to learn new technologies. There's a honeymoon period at DevMountain where everything is hunky dory and you’re going great, but with any career change, no school wants to tell you exactly how hard it's going to be. Some of the people in my cohort had a very difficult time finding their first jobs. DevMountain tells you, "You have to keep moving. This is not the end. This is not the plateau. This is the beginning of the rest of your career so you need to keep moving."

    What was your first job after becoming a student mentor at DevMountain?

    The first job I had was at a startup and it was nothing like I expected. The CTO was my senior, and I was the sole front end developer. If I needed help on a project or some guidance, that support wasn't there. At the same time, I became very self-reliant and had to push myself. Unfortunately, three months in, the company went through some financial problems and laid off half of the developer team. Since I was new, I was let go.  

    What were you looking for in your next role? Did you receive help from DevMountain?

    I was not looking for a startup for my next job. My wife is a stay-at-home mom, and we have two toddlers so I needed to have some security. If I was young and single, I would’ve hit up another startup right away. When you have a family and you’re rooted to an area, it may be difficult to find a job. I knew a couple of grads who were single, who found jobs at startups in Boston or California. But as the sole breadwinner here in Utah, my net was not as big.

    DevMountain was able to assist me as much as they could. There were a good amount of job opportunities. Megan Barbara at DevMountain was very supportive; sending me jobs that matched my skill set, and sending my resume to employers. On top of that, I knew a few recruiters and reached out to my network with LinkedIn premium, which was amazing. It gave me a lot of insight into my capabilities and where I stood amongst other developers. And I joined tons of Facebook groups, local tech groups, and went to meetups.

    When I was let go from the startup, one of the first things I did was reach back out to every company I'd ever talked to – and Overstock was one of them. I’d had seven or eight job interviews when I was a student mentor, so I contacted those companies to see if they had any new positions. The Overstock recruiter told me, "I remember you did great at the onsite interview, they liked you, but you got edged out. Let me see if I can find something.” It still took him six weeks to find something, but it was part of that process.

    Congrats on your job at Overstock! Tell us about the company and your role.

    My title is front end developer and I’ve been working at Overstock for about 9 months. My team has two front end developers, two back end developers, three full stack developers, two QA’s, a dev lead, one UX person, and a product manager. At Overstock as a whole, we have close to 300 developers including front end, back end, QA, and Dev leads. We have 58 front end developers at Overstock and I believe about a quarter of them are DevMountain grads. Overstock and DevMountain have a really good relationship.

    Overstock as a company is pretty laid back. My team has stand-up at 9:30am, and if we need to work from home, we just call in via phone. I’ll work for a couple of hours on QA bugs, go to lunch, then continue working. When I say working, it doesn’t feel like work because I love what I do. Since we are laid back, we play ping pong, video games and grab coffee. No one's looking over my shoulder making sure that I'm coding 24/7. They know I'm doing my job and doing what's expected of me, so there is no micromanagement.

    I’m pushing myself harder than I've ever pushed myself, and I think being at Overstock is harder than 99% of my DevMountain classmates who are at startups.  Overstock also takes good care of their developers. Many of my classmates look at us at Overstock and wish they were here. Overstock is the largest tech company in Utah. If you’re in California, everyone wants to be at Facebook in Silicon Valley, and if you make it to Facebook, you've made it. For me, being at Overstock means I made it. It feels good.

    Are you using the stack/programming languages you learned at DevMountain?

    I'm not. I learned and taught Angular at DevMountain, but my tech stack at Overstock is React, and all of it is self-taught. It was difficult to ramp up, but DevMountain gave me a really good foundation of how to learn and how to be a developer. No one in the real world will hold your hand and walk you through how to write JavaScript applications. If I hit a wall, I have to know where to find a solution. I use YouTube videos, projects on Udemy, and Pluralsight, and that’s how I've continued to learn here at Overstock.

    When I first started at Overstock, I was told I was pretty junior. I knew some things, but I needed more help than my manager was expecting. Now that I have been here nine months, I’m further along in my learning because of how Overstock is set up. I take my education very seriously here. I have a mentor, and a team which allows me to be very outspoken with my questions. We have a Slack channel for front end developers at Overstock which has 50 members, where I regularly ask questions.

    Has your background in facilities and vendor management been useful in your front end developer job?

    I think any real-world experiences is beneficial because it’s given me a different outlook. I solve problems very differently than other people on my team, because of my background.

    The main skill I bring from vendor management is organization skills. I worked with 60 different companies across the country, and I used my skills to keep all of that in check. Organizing multiple people across multiple companies and working remotely also helped me with my communication skills. I get laughed at at Overstock sometimes because I keep track of absolutely everything. I'm a forgetful person, so out of necessity, I learned to be organized.  

    What’s been the biggest challenge or roadblock in your journey to becoming a fully fledged software developer?

    My biggest roadblock was me and my own confidence. I had self-doubt, feelings of depression and anxiety, and imposter syndrome. I thought, “Why should I, who just graduated from a 13-week bootcamp, be next to someone who just spent four years in college getting a computer science degree? I don't deserve to be here.” But in reality, I do deserve to be here because what I learned at DevMountain was practical, hands-on knowledge. When I ask Overstock intern applicants, who are computer science students, simple questions, some can’t even answer them. They know the theory, but they don't have the technical, hands-on experience. I know that a DevMountain grad would be able to answer those same questions right away. My biggest takeaway from all of it was that bootcamps are really trade schools equipping you with hands-on experience.

    What advice do you have for people making a career change through a coding bootcamp?

    A coding bootcamp is not for everyone. Don't expect this to be an easy way to make money – this is not easy. This is the hardest thing I've done in my entire life, and I have done some very hard things. You need to take a hard look at yourself and know whether or not you're willing to put in the time, effort, and sacrifice that it takes to become a full stack developer. If you're not willing to do that, then a bootcamp may not be for you. But if you are, give it your all and trust the system. DevMountain absolutely changed my life. My brother-in-law was working in a factory and went through DevMountain after me. Now he's a developer too. This hasn't just changed my life, but it's changed my family's life.

    Read more DevMountain reviews on Course Report. Check out the DevMountain website.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/4484/s300/lauren-stewart-headshot.jpg-logo

    Lauren is a communications and operations strategist who loves to help others find their idea of success. She is passionate about techonology education, career development, startups, and the arts. Her background includes career/youth development, public affairs, and philanthropy. She is from Richmond, VA and now currently resides in Los Angeles, CA.

  • 2017 End of Year News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/28/2017

    In our End of Year Podcast, we're rounding up the most interesting news of 2017 and covering all the trends, thought pieces, controversies and more. Many schools are hitting their 5 year anniversaries – a reminder that although there is a lot going on in this industry, it’s still nascent and there is still room for new innovative approaches to the bootcamp model. We’ve chosen the most defining stories, and it was a very eventful year – a couple of big bootcamps closed, a ton of new bootcamps launched, some schools were acquired, and other bootcamps raised money.

    Continue Reading →
  • November 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/1/2017

    On the Course Report Coding Bootcamp News Roundup, we keep you up to date with the blossoming coding bootcamp industry. This November, we're covering the WeWork/Flatiron School acquisition, over $2M in funding to various bootcamps, and why tech is booming in "Heartland" cities. Of course we also look at new schools, new campuses, and our favorite pieces to work on this month for the Course Report blog! Plus, is The Iron Yard back from the dead? Read the summary or listen to the podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • October 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/5/2017

    October 2017 was a busy month for the coding bootcamp industry with news about growing pains in bootcamp outcomes, mergers, acquisitions, investments, a trend towards bootcamp B2B training, and diversity initiatives. To help you out, we’ve collected all the most important news in this blog post and podcast. Plus, we added 12 new schools from around the world to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • September 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe9/28/2017

    Need a rundown of everything that happened in the coding bootcamp industry this September? You’re in luck! We’ve collected all the most important news in this blog post and podcast. This month, we kept up with the status of the bootcamp industry, learned about how bootcamps are thriving in smaller markets, and explored different ways to pay for bootcamp. Plus, we added 7 new schools from around the world to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • June 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe6/29/2017

    Missed any news about coding bootcamps from June 2017? Course Report is here for you! We’ve compiled the most important news and developments in this blog post and podcast. In June, we heard John Oliver and Megyn Kelly talk about bootcamps, we read about new investments in bootcamps, a number of newspapers wrote about the impact bootcamps are having at a local level, and we were excited to hear about more diversity initiatives and scholarships. Plus we round up all the new campuses and new coding bootcamps around the world.

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  • Episode 11: February 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast

    Imogen Crispe3/1/2017

    Here’s what we found ourselves reading and discussing in the Course Report office in February 2017! We found out the three most in-demand programming languages, we read about how coding could be the new blue collar job, and looked at how new schools are tweaking the bootcamp model to fit their communities. Plus, we hear about a cool app for NBA fans built by coding bootcamp graduates! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

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  • September 2016 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe1/18/2018

    Welcome to the September 2016 Course Report monthly coding bootcamp news roundup! Each month, we look at all the happenings from the coding bootcamp world from new bootcamps to big fundraising announcements, to interesting trends. Of course, we cover our 2016 Outcomes and Demographics Report (we spent a ton of time on this one and hope everyone gets a chance to read it)! Other trends include growth of the industry, increasing diversity in tech through bootcamps, plus news about successful bootcamp alumni, and new schools and campuses. Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast!

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  • May 2016 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe5/31/2016

    Welcome to the May 2016 Course Report monthly coding bootcamp news roundup! Each month we look at all the happenings from the coding bootcamp world, from acquisitions, to new bootcamps, to collaborations with universities, and also various reports and studies. Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup podcast.

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  • Which Coding Bootcamps Have Been Acquired?

    Liz Eggleston6/8/2018

    Since the first bootcamp acquisition in June 2014, we’ve seen several coding bootcamps get acquired by a range of companies from for-profit education companies (Capella Education), to co-working companies (WeWork), and other coding bootcamps (Thinkful + Bloc)! With rapid market growth in the bootcamp industry, for-profit education companies are taking note. These acquisitions and consolidations should come as no surprise, and some have been very successful, with schools going on to increase their number of campuses and course offerings. As coding bootcamps become more mature, we are seeing them get snapped up by more well-known companies, for increasingly large sums (e.g. General Assembly for $413 million!) We’ll keep this chronologically-ordered list updated as bootcamps announce future acquisitions.

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  • 16 Coding Bootcamps with Free or Affordable Housing

    Imogen Crispe8/17/2018

    we-got-coders-bootcamp-free-accommodation 

    A coding bootcamp can propel your career in tech to new heights, but that often means quitting a job, uprooting your life, or moving to a new city. Maybe you’re moving to a new city to become a developer and need a short-term housing option. Or perhaps you’re an international student without credit history. Regardless of your background, funds can become tight when committing to a full-time, intensive bootcamp, and suddenly expenses like rent and food can be stressful. Luckily, there are coding bootcamps that make housing easy.

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  • Instructor Spotlight: Ryan of DevMountain Dallas

    Liz Eggleston4/4/2016

    ryan-walsh-devmountain-spotlight

    While you may associate DevMountain with the Silicon Slopes of Utah, the team recently expanded to Dallas, Texas, where they’re teaching a second cohort of MEAN Stack developers. We talk to lead instructor Ryan Walsh about free student housing in Dallas, integrating the DevMountain culture into the Dallas campus, and keeping their MEAN Stack curriculum updated to get students job-ready!

    What is your role at DevMountain Dallas?

    I’m the co-Lead Instructor, along with our founder and CEO Cahlan Sharp. I teach two to three times per week in the classroom and make sure our MEAN Stack curriculum is current and updated.

    Why expand from Utah to Dallas- what’s special about this city?

    The Dallas campus has been open for six months; we’ve graduated one cohort and currently teaching our second. I was at the Provo campus before, so I’ve been in Dallas since February.

    It’s a really cool city – super dog-friendly! The tech scene is also very active; there are meetups going on everywhere. Two weeks ago, we hosted a NodeSchool meetup at our campus. We love how active the community is, and how willing the people here have been to accept us and our students into their business and organizations.

    Have you noticed a difference between the two campuses?

    The students aren’t particularly different, but every cohort generates a unique identity. The last cohort was very business-like while this cohort has a more “college” atmosphere – they goof around and play ping-pong, then work all night.

    Are the admissions standards different for each campus?

    Our admissions process is always uniform across all campus locations. To start the application process, students select the specific session they are interested in joining. After we review their application, they will participate in a phone interview and a coding challenge. The only variant is the challenge, which depends on the curriculum a student is applying for (Web Dev, iOS Dev, or UX Design).

    I don’t have a huge role in admissions, but I do answer questions from applicants during the admissions process and I grade the coding challenges. That coding challenge for our Web Development course covers JavaScript basics.

    Does the Web Dev Immersive teach full-stack JavaScript?

    Yes; everything we do is focused on JavaScript, particularly the MEAN Stack (Mongo, Express, Angular, and Node). Students don’t have to learn two separate languages for front and back end development.

    What are the challenges in being in charge of a MEAN stack curriculum at a bootcamp? How often does DevMountain change the curriculum to keep up with JavaScript?

    It’s tough, and there’s a lot of discussion between me and Cahlan (DevMountain CEO) and the other instructors. It’s a very iterative process. For example, we just added a full day devoted to ES6 to this cohort’s curriculum. We cover React for several days as well. But mostly what we look at when we design the curriculum is what will get students jobs. Personally, I love writing React.JS, but there are a lot more jobs for Angular.

    We also take student feedback really seriously for the curriculum. We’ve had several projects where we’ve heard feedback about vagueness, so we’ll rework those projects. If the project isn’t working for students, then it’s not working at all.

    Have you seen most of your students get jobs using Angular in Dallas?

    We have one student working in React, but mostly our students get hired into Angular positions. Several of our students have worked in .NET roles, and at least one in a Rails role. We generally see DevMountain students hired in Front End positions. But since they have learned back end as well, they’re able to communicate with the whole dev team at their company.

    I see a range of jobs, roles, and companies. Two days ago we had ad agency The Richards Group join us at DevMountain. And two of our students are working on the Front End team at Varidesk.

    Is there an ideal class size for the DevMountain Dallas campus?

    Our first cohort graduated 15 students, and there are 16 on track to graduate in our current cohort. We want to cap classes at ~15 to 20 students. We’ll expand slowly as we build out the space. We want to make sure we have enough resources to fill more seats without the students suffering.

    Did those first 15 students all get jobs?

    Our employment rate for the last cohort is 92%, and that’s only two months after graduation.

    Are there other TAs or instructors at DevMountain Dallas?

    Cahlan and I are the lead instructors; however we regularly bring in guest instructors who are working in the industry; they can use their experience to teach students. We’ve also had students graduate, get a job, then come back and guest instruct. That’s been a cool side-effect!

    Our mentors play a huge role as well. They help students debug their work, get through their daily struggles and meet with them every day to make sure they’re on track with the curriculum. Established developers, alumni, and industry devs all get involved in our students’ education. That makes for a perfect combination of mentors who know where you are starting, where you are at, and where you are going.

    Where is the campus in Dallas? Is the classroom cool?

    We’re right downtown in the Alto building, and we’re partnered with a coworking space called Fort Work. They have a nice, large space and we have a dedicated section for DevMountain. We have a ping pong table and some gaming systems for our students to let off some steam after they’ve been sitting in front of their code for hours. We also have a Coke fridge that we regularly stock with free soda – because sometimes you need a little sugar or caffeine to make it through the day.

    I know that DevMountain offers free housing in Dallas, Provo, and Salt Lake City. What is the housing like in Dallas?

    The housing in Dallas is really nice. It’s about 2-3 blocks from the campus, which is really walkable. The buildings have tons of amenities- workout/fitness centers, a pool, sauna (I haven’t checked that out yet). I think we really lucked out on housing in Dallas.

    More students take advantage of the free housing in Dallas than in Utah- it’s definitely something I recommend to students. It’s nice to cut out distractions of the real-world and just surround yourself with other coders for 3 months.

    Have you found that the Dallas cohort is mostly out-of-town students? Are folks traveling in order to attend the course?

    In this cohort, we don’t have a ton of students from Dallas itself. Right now, we’re seeing a lot of folks from Texas, but not everyone from out of town sticks around. Several student in Dallas actually live near Provo, Utah, but they found out that they could get into the Dallas class sooner than Provo, so they came down here to start sooner.

    What’s been the biggest challenge in being a part of a new campus early on?

    The biggest challenge for me has been adjusting to the atmosphere here. It still has the feel of DevMountain, but you have to adjust to the feel of the area and the working space and get an idea for how to best integrate DevMountain into Dallas for the students.

    Are there beginner resources in Dallas that you recommend?

    Meetups! The NodeSchool meetups vary between Intro and Advanced. The meetup we hosted a couple weeks ago was an Intro to MongoDB for complete beginners. Most meetups will vary between complex topics and beginner-friendly sessions.

    Find out more and read DevMountain reviews on Course Report. To learn more about Ryan and the Dallas campus, check out the DevMountain website!

    About The Author

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    Liz is the cofounder of Course Report, the most complete resource for students considering a coding bootcamp. She loves breakfast tacos and spending time getting to know bootcamp alumni and founders all over the world. Check out Liz & Course Report on Twitter, Quora, and YouTube

  • Learn Web Development at these 10 Part-Time Bootcamps

    Harry Hantel8/24/2018

    While quitting your job and diving headfirst into your coding education can yield impressive results, we also understand that not everybody can commit to a full-time, 12-week programming bootcamp. Jobs, school, families - life, in general, can prevent that kind of commitment. For all the students who can’t give 40 hours a week to a code school, we’re outlining some of the best part-time web development bootcamps around. With a variety of price points and locations to choose from, you'll find an in-person program that can get you coding, even with your busy schedule. 

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  • 14 Best Coding Bootcamps in the South

    Harry Hantel4/6/2015

    (updated April 2018)

    Slide across the roof of the General Lee, we’re heading south of the Mason-Dixon to check out the best coding bootcamps in the southern United States. There are some fantastic code schools from the Carolinas to Georgia and all the way to Texas, and we’re covering them all. Talk about Southern Hospitality!

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  • Learn iOS at These Mobile Developer Bootcamps

    Harry Hantel6/19/2017

    Apple’s newest, beginner-oriented programming language Swift has made developing for the iPhone a possibility for new and experienced developers alike. iOS developers earn over $100,000 on average, so it's a perfect time to learn to program for the iPhone. With the help of one of these iOS bootcamps, you could find yourself developing mobile apps utilizing Objective-C, Cocoa Touch, and Swift. 

     

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  • $200 Off Dev Mountain

    Liz Eggleston9/19/2014

    This scholarship may be expired or out of date. Click here for a full list of current scholarships. 

    Dev Mountain offers both after-hours and immersive 12-week coding bootcamp programs in Provo and Salt Lake City, UT where students are trained and mentored by industry experts. The Course Report community is eligible for a $200 scholarship to Dev Mountain! 

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  • Exclusive Course Report Bootcamp Scholarships

    Liz Eggleston2/2/2018

    Looking for coding bootcamp exclusive scholarships, discounts and promo codes? Course Report has exclusive discounts to the top programming bootcamps!

    Questions? Email scholarships@coursereport.com

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  • DevMountain

    Liz Eggleston3/6/2014

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Thanks!