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Turing

Denver

Turing

Avg Rating:4.78 ( 164 reviews )

Turing School of Software & Design is a 7-month, full-time training program in Denver, CO turning driven students into professional developers. Students who take their Back End Engineering Program or their front End Engineering Program will be surrounded by a supportive team dedicated to their career success. Turing's mission is to unlock human potential by training a diverse, inclusive student body to succeed in high-fulfillment technical careers, while Turing's vision is a world powered by technology where the people building it represent the people using it. Turing is the brainchild of Jeff Casimir and Jumpstart Labs (you might recognize these names from Hungry Academy and gSchool, among other achievements). The staff at Turing emphasizes their educational experience, not just their years as developers, and promises that successful graduates of the school will be valuable contributors to the company they choose to work for through community-driven education. The application process is rolling and requires a resume, writing sample, video response, and logic challenge. Students in the Turing program will learn TDD with Ruby, Ruby Web Applications with Sinatra & Rails, Professional Web Applications, and High-Performance Applications with APIs and Services. In addition, Turing now accepts the GI Bill and offers M-1 visa assistance.

 

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  • Back-End Engineering

    Apply
    HTML, Git, JavaScript, Sinatra, jQuery, Rails, CSS, Ruby, SQL
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week27 Weeks
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$20,000
    Class size28
    LocationDenver
    Moving from the basics of object-oriented programming and software execution to building database-backed web applications in Sinatra and Rails, our Back-End Engineering program provides the fundamental skills to launch your career in programming.
    Financing
    Deposit$1,000
    Financing
    Tuition PlansAlternative Financing available for students who are not approved by our lending partners.
    Scholarship$4,000 Diversity Scholarship
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelN/A
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Front-End Engineering

    Apply
    Start Date Rolling Start Date
    Cost$20,000
    Class size28
    LocationDenver
    Students in our Front-End Engineering program build the skills and knowledge to be professional front end developer. They start by building a solid foundation with JavaScript and HTML/CSS, then layer on React and related libraries. They mix in some APIs and data storage, and FEE students are building production-ready web applications.
    Financing
    Deposit$1,000
    Financing
    Tuition PlansAlternative Financing available for students who are not approved by our lending partners.
    Scholarship$4,000 Diversity Scholarship
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelN/A
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Sekhar Paladugu  User Photo
    Sekhar Paladugu • Software Engineer • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    Hi, I'm Sekhar, I graduated from Turing about 3.5 years ago and enrolled back in August 2015 when Turing was pretty new. I graduated from college in 2012 with a BA in History, and spent three years working in sales and marketing in both California and Colorado. In the summer of 2015, I quit my job and decided to go to Turing to become a software engineer. Course Report actually interviewed me back when I was a student, so for my detail on my story check that out here:

    https://www.coursereport.com/blog/student-spotlight-sekhar-paladugu-of-turing-school 

    Turing changed my life. I came from a sales and marketing background, having majored in the humanities in undergrad, and I got a second shot at trying out a technical career years after I left undergrad. Programming has been such a joy at a deep level, and I'm totally satisfied in my current career, which is something I was unable to say whatsoever in my first three jobs out of college. Turing allowed me to build the basic skill set and learning patterns that is the foundation of my engineering career.

    I now work as a Software Engineer at a fast-growing startup based in New York, and I work remotely from my home in Denver. I've been at the same company for three years and the time has flown by. On every vector, my current career is the polar opposite of my time in sales and marketing. My work is engaging, an intellectual challenge, my hours are flexible, I can easily work remote, I get paid more than triple my last job in marketing... the list could go on.

    Every day I feel grateful for the fact that this surreal experience of getting paid to solve problems, collaborate with colleagues, build my craft in coding, and more is what I get paid to do! One myth about engineering that I'm so glad is untrue is that you work alone and don't work with other people. I'm a social animal and extreme extrovert, and every day I'm working with at least a half-dozen colleagues, and if I wanted to, all my work could be pair programmed. Meaning, there's no solo work in many cases unless you seek it.

    I'm so glad that my apprehension in college that this wasn't for me didn't lead me to never try out coding. I was so fortunate that at a crossroads in my career early on bootcamps came up as an alternative model and I didn't have to go into six figures of debt to go back for a second bachelors, only to then try out and see if this career was for me.

    I talk plenty in my Course Report interview above about the school, educational quality, and various other experiences at Turing, so I don't want to cover that redunantly here. It was a five-star operation all around. There were certainly roadbumps, and running any complex organization you'll encounter those. Overall though, I'm totally satisfied. I can hopefully give a bit of a window in sides of the post-Turing life that aren't covered as much in these reviews, since I'm four years out from when I started.

    I paid off my loans for living costs and tuition (~$40k total) from Turing within about ~18 months. Changing careers allowed me to save for retirement, buy a home, have the wedding I wanted (and plan said wedding, given my flexible remote schedule!), and have a solid future ahead of me in an in-demand career I love and that gets me excited to come to work every week. I no longer have the Sunday blues before a terrible week of office politics and aggressive deadlines with unreasonable goals.

    Four years out, I'm now highly competitive as a candidate in the engineering job market. While getting the first job can be tough, once you have a few years under your belt, you will see what the term "career capital" really means. We have a #salaries Slack channel where folks post their job offers, raises, promotions, and more. My pay has increased over 50% from when I first started working as a Software Engineer three years ago fresh out of Turing (70k to 117.5k). In past jobs, no matter what track record I had, getting a raise of even 2-5k could be brutal, and there was a line of candidates out the door to replace me in every job I left.

    Having been in a former career where it was a struggle to get entry- and mid-level experience and to get any company to call you back, I feel grateful for the feeling of security I have working as an engineer and having recruiters reach out to me almost daily. I've put my resume on Hired and Vettery recently (headhunting services for engineers) and get so many requests from companies I've had to take down my candidacy after getting a dozen plus inquiries within a week, for job offers substantially above what I already make.

    My parting piece of advice is, if you are strongly considering going to a code school like Turing, I'd say just make the jump and don't second guess yourself. The field of software development is growing rapidly, and it's a great fit for many different types of people, backgrounds and skill sets. I've seen many hesitate and pass up the chance to really change their lives due to fear of the unknown. I've been through this myself and all I can say is I highly encourage folks to make the leap and become a software engineer (and, of course, go to Turing!).

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    Your work always comes down to your persistence. The industry is better off for having you in it: working, advocating, and making things better.
  • Ricardo   User Photo
    Ricardo • Software Developer • Graduate • Verified via LinkedIn
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    And that makes all the difference in the world. 

    The fact that Turing has an eval system at the end of each module that is a simple pass or fail is ultimately what separates Turing from any other coding camp that I've yet encountered. They will make you repeat a module and if you cannot make it through the second time around then you are simply asked to leave. This is key

    Imagine being in class and feeling that pit of insecurity that you might not make it through the program. What if I wasted my time? Did I waste my money? What if I'm not smart enough? What if I've been lying to myself? Do I really deserve this? This isn't going to work! Now imagine how loud those questions become should Turing, in fact, hold you back a module. It happened to me. 

    That was by far the biggest challenge that I and believe many others actually contend with while at Turing. I'm convinced those who failed to make it through the program are those who let those questions overwhelm their thoughts. It's also why I believe your average Turing grad is stronger than most any other boot camp or CS degree grad. 

    This is why I'm currently working as a software developer at Salesforce. This is how I had the confidence to step into an hour-long whiteboarding session with an interviewer who has a PhD in CS, followed by 3 more hours of back to back to back coding and culture fit interviews. This is why I'm not having trouble keeping up with my co-workers, some of whom graduated with masters degrees in CS from Cal Poly, School of Mines or Stanford to name a few. 

    I'm still terrified. I still deal with imposter syndrome on a daily basis. I still doubt most everything that I say or do while at work. But I know I can deal with it. I can deal with it because of what Turing forced me to work through. I shudder to think of walking into this office without having already faced those inner demons.

    Thank you, Turing. You fundamentally altered the course and direction of my life and more importantly the lives of my family. You've given me security by making me face insecurity. You set a standard that for myself that I'm still trying hard to reach. 

    For those of you who read this far... 

    You might fail. It's what makes Turing worth it. 

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    People might fairly assume we're most proud of the superstars who dominate every challenge. But they're not really the point of the work. They could have learned by reading books or getting a masters in CS. There's so much more pride when we get to support and watch somebody struggle, doubt, find their determination, and finally succeed. That's when you know we've really done something together. I'll always remember your kiddo's "first steps" video in the Turing hallway. Go build her an amazing future.
  • Carrie Walsh  User Photo
    Carrie Walsh • data engineer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    When I decided to make the change from teaching to programming, originally I wanted to do an apprenticeship in Boulder. Then a friend made me go to a Try Coding for Teachers. I knew right away that I had met my people.

    Fast-forward and I'm graduating today. It's so surreal. Turing provides such a unique experience and you can feel how much they care and want you to succeed. Don't get me wrong, it is a difficult 7 months. There are a lot of late nights and a lot of times you reach a wall and can't see how to get over it. But the skills they provide you to plan and climb those hurdles is beyond what I expected. I've felt nothing but support and the community both in the basement and beyond is more than I could have hoped for.

    The more you put into your time at Turing, the more you get out of it.

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    There are some people who have this inexplicable light about them. When everything is hard, when everything is broken, they're somehow the ones that remind people "WE CAN DO THIS." Thank you for sharing your light with our community and lifting up everyone around you.
  • BE Graduate
    - 6/6/2019
    Nick  User Photo
    Nick • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    The program is advertised as a 7 month program.  The program is broken into four 6 week modules.  In many cases, students have to repeat one or two of these modules.  The program will then take you and extra 3 months. That being said, the program was the best thing I have ever done.  It is NOT for everyone.  I spent an average of 60-70 a week either on campus or at home working on projects, in class or studying.  There are very few opportunities to take a day off.  If you remember that this program is less than a year, it makes the long hours easier.  Go to a try coding event if you want to check it out.  

    The school is in a cool location in Denver.  Take public transportation if you have the option.  

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    Determination isn't always enough. Some folks have put in a millions hours and things still don't work out. Then, there are some where it just takes a minute to get off the starting line. But, powered by commitment and work ethic, they reach top speed. Thanks for sticking with it and finding your way. 
  • Mike L.  User Photo
    Mike L. • Web Client Engineer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    TLDR: If you are ready for a dev-related career, can afford to take 7+ months to learn and are prepared to WORK HARD, go to Turing!

    I made a career switch from Marketing to Frontend Development and went through the 3rd wave of the frontend program (1610). I wanted a career where I could solve challenging problems, work hard to improve my skillset and work remote. Programming (with Turing's help) gave me just that.

    Turing was an incredible place to learn. The facility is great (you might think windows would be nice but when you need to stay heads-down on a project, a basement is the best place). The staff is incredibly knowledgable and does everything in their power to set you up for success. The curriculum was great then (2016/2017) and prepared me well and has been iterated on and vastly improved in the years since. Lastly, you are going through it with a bunch of other people learning the same things you are. These people will become invaluable resources for your learning, sanity and even job prospects down the road.

    **If you work hard, the skills will come...but the community you immerse yourself in with Turing is the greatest value you will receive. **

    The outcomes of Turing were incredible. They were supportive with the job search, helped prepare me for interviews and provided the resources necessary to build an attractive resume. Plus when you have access to hundreds of Turing graduates, networking is kind of fun. Within a few months after attending I was able to increase my salary by 40% and now on my 2nd dev job (almost 2 years since graduating) I have essentially doubled the salary I had before attending Turing. Not to mention I work remote which was a big incentive I sought out when switching careers (keep in mind it can take a while after Turing to establish the necessary skills to be successful in a remote environment). 

    On top of the technical skills, Turing does an amazing job of reinforcing and enhancing what the industry calls "soft skills". Through weekly "Gear Ups", you learn a better sense of respect and how to navigate differing opinions. Code is written for human eyes at the end of the day and your ability to collaborate and effectively communicate with others will make you more attractive to companies, better to work with and let's be honest, a better person in general. 

    So I'll repeat it here - If you are ready for a dev-related career, can afford to take 7+ months to learn and are prepared to WORK HARD, go to Turing! The admission cost is a tiny price to pay for what you get in return.

    Some final thoughts and opinions:

    • Be ready to WORK! The classtime/worktime hours are only part of it. I put in 60-80 hour weeks regularly while attending Turing. 
    • Don't try to work while attending Turing (if you can help it). Things will get intense quickly and the stress levels are high enough. If you can manage to take out a loan to afford your cost of living on top of Turing, the average salareis being reported from graduates will be more than enough to pay it back quickly. 
    • I've seen some folks drop out because they feel they didn't get what they paid for...First off the cost is nothing when you think about what you're getting. More importantly, going to Turing does not guarantee you a career in programming. They will do everything in their power to help you succeed. What you get out is what YOU put in. You can't "buy" a new career. You will need to work your ass off and earn it. 
    • ​Turing is an "All In" experience. If your plan is to pick and choose the lessons you attend and skip out on others, Turing is not for you.

    If you're still reading this I hope you found it helpful. Turing changed my life. I love what I do for work, am constantly learning/growing and am able to live where I want to because of the skils they helped me acquire. If you are prepared to work for it, Turing will get you there. 

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    People talk about how the industry is built on 100-hour, high-pressure weeks of work without a minute to breathe. But this guy's living the dream in Steamboat and his instagram is a non-stop stream of trout. TELL THE WORLD YOUR SECRETS MICHAEL LIMBERG.
  • Tim Tyrrell  User Photo
    Tim Tyrrell • Developer Verified via GitHub
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    They gave me a sense of purpose.

    They taught me what hard-work looks like, what it leads to, and why it's important.

    They challenged me to be a better me. They asked me to challenge others to be a better them.

    They gave me a sense of empathy for those I assumed had always had had a similar experience to mine, which was a wildly inaccurate assumption.

    They gave me a skill. Then, they gave me another skill. They gave me skills that build on skills.

    They gave me their effort. They gave me their support.

    They gave me a community to be inspired by. They gave me people I can depend on. They gave me better firends.

    They gave me an opportunity to be proud of my self. They gave me the chance to lift up others.

    They gave me a chance to contemplate impact and responsibility.

    They gave me tough love when I needed it. They gave me perspective.

    They didn't give me a choice to do it my way, instead, they showed me the right way to do it.

    They gave me a chance to help make the community feel more like it was mine when I was a student.

    They gave me a career.

    They gave me ladder.

    They threw me a life preserver when I was floundering.

    They listened to me.

    They gave me a hand when I was down.

    They cared about me and my success. They care about me and my success.

    They gave me an opportunity to change my life. They gave me an opportunity to change the lives of my grandchildren.

    I don't have any grandchildren.

    They gave me a place to belong. They gave me a sense of what equality actually looks like.

    They gave me advice on how to grow. They grew me. 

    They keep giving to me. They will never stop giving to me. 

    Every day this community grows in size, so do my future prospects within this industry. Every time a Turing alumni does their job well, my name gains respect by association. And, every time I represent myself well, I have the opportunity to fuel that respect as well.

    What else will Turing give me in a year? In five? In ten? 

    These are questions I feel privileged to ask.

    How can I ever give enough back to them? 

    Truthfully, I can't. They've given me a new life. A better life. How do you repay that? 

    But, I will still keep giving, keep trying, keep growing, because I know they will never stop doing the same for me and our community at large.

    I am but a small slice of Turing. But, I am Turing. And, Turing is an extension of me. But, more importantly it is an extension of many who are not me. And, it is an organism that will never be complete. It will grow and evolve and iterate to become more than any one person ever could be. It already has done that, and it will only grow stronger.

    Thinking about what Turing might give you? All the above and more. 

    But, more importantly, one should be thinking about what one can give to Turing. For this is the mindset that will enable one to obtain the most successful outcome.

    Giving yields getting in this community. 

    If you give yourself, your effort, your trust, your energy, and your mind to Turing, you will get more than you had ever dreamed a "code-school" could possibly provide.

    Thank you, again and again, thank you Turing. 

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    Thanks, Tim, for now spending your free time mentoring and guiding the next generations. We're already seeing dropouts trending down and graduation trending up thanks to your work.
  • Charlie C.  User Photo
    Charlie C. • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I attended the backend program at Turing school in March 2017 (1703). I worked in public libraries for about a decade before discovering a passion for coding. Code school seemed to be the most efficient way to accomplish a career change. I chose Turing because it was the longest, most in depth, and most well-reviewed of Denver's options. I also appreciated that it was non-profit.

    I did the backend program, graduated after 6 months or so, had a job within a couple weeks of graduation. I'm about a year and a half into my software engineering career now. I’m a full stack engineer, which means I do front end, back end, and devops. Turing prepared me for this. I am absolutely loving every moment if it. 

    Of course, while I was in the Turing basement, I don't think I'd describe it as love. I worked 12-16 hours a day, seven days a week throughout the entire program. For seven months, I didn't have a day off, I didn’t see my family or friends, I didn't read or hike or have any hobbies. I’m not usually a crier, but for seven months, I coded and I cried; and, because Turing time is precious, I coded while crying because it’s more efficient! Part of that is my fault for being overly intense about achievement and learning, but part of that is the stressful nature of the program (there’s a row of small rooms near the kitchen that are officially called “phone booths” but are unofficially referred to by students as the “crying rooms”). But, I learned what I needed to learn, I finished, got a job as an actual software engineer, have the tools I need to be good at my job. And, you guys: my job is super dope

    I absolutely recommend the program, but feel the need to point out that my cohort lost about half of its students along the way. Either they left the program entirely or stayed back to repeat a module. It is one of the hardest code schools — that’s why it has such a great reputation with employers — but not everyone makes it through. That’s part of the stress of the program is seeing this happen to other people and being terrified that it might happen to you in a few weeks. What if you work as hard as you can and it’s not enough?

    I don't say so to discourage you from attending, but rather if you choose to attend, I encourage you to set yourself up for success: Do all the pre work, including the extra extensions. Don't plan long hikes on weekends or camping trips during intermissions. Say “farewell for now” to your family and friends. Budget for eating out a lot if you don't have someone to cook for you. Invest in dry shampoo. Listen to the teachers and don’t get mad at them when they tell you to Google it. You need to hear that. And show up every day ready to work harder and longer than you probably have ever before. It's a long 7 months, but it's only 7 months.

    If it’s what you want and you’re willing to put in the work, it’s totally worth it.

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    I weighs heavily on me to think about all the students who haven't graduated. Folks who spent time, energy, and money to figure out it just wasn't for them. We've worked to improve and deepen our prep programs before people show up along with constantly refining our instructional content, methodology, and execution. I'm committed to achieving a 90% graduation rate and 90% employment within 90 days of graduation. With the help of people like you and Keegan out there proving that the model works and opening one door after another, we'll get there.
  • Adam Lusk  User Photo
    Adam Lusk • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    I was a struggling musician with a Master's. Now I'm a well-paid software engineer thanks to Turing, and I couldn't be happier. If you are considering a boot camp to learn software, look to Turing first.

    The program lives up to its reputation. It is very difficult and time consuming, and the staff is extremely knowledgeable and caring. If you get through it, you'll have a portfolio full of web apps to show to potential employers that students coming out of universities with CS degress lack. And there is a very inclusive atmosphere that invites a diverse group of people to share ideas and experiences with each other to develop all kinds of empathy, a desparately needed skill in any industry. 

    Just go there already and make your life better while making everybody else's life better with the technology you will build. 

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Thursday, Aug 29 2019
    Why are there so many musicians turned programmers? People typically talk about the patterns of music being similar to the patterns of programming, but I think it's more behavioral. Musicians learn to practice, critique, and revise. The small details that might go unnoticed are your stumbling blocks you can't get over. So you work and work and work to fix it. Practice, critique, do it again. Thanks for making it work.
  • Gray Smith  User Photo
    Gray Smith • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    I very much enjoyed my time at Turing and got an amazing new job a little more than a month out from graduating. I considered several different bootcamps and the thing that sold me on Turing was the staff and the commitment to excellence. Turing is a single-location non-profit and the founders are down in the basement day in and day out critically analyzing everything they do and continuously improving the curriculum. I’m actually jealous of the current students because I feel like the curriculum has gotten markedly better even since I’ve been there a few months ago. 
     
    Turing also has a very good reputation with employers because their graduates are actually job ready. Turing is very hard especially if you’ve never done any previous programming (most students haven’t so its normal). Prep work before starting is crucial to your success in the program in my opinion. They are currently working on Module 0 to help people prepare. As hard as it is, Turing is a lot of fun! The projects are awesome and you will make some really good friends. The camaraderie and mutual support in the basement is infectious. The teachers are also excellent and very committed to the students. 
     
    You will get a job after Turing and a lot of graduates are making really good money right out of school. However, you have to work hard for it and make sure all your ducks are in a row (networking, projects, personal site, interview skills, LinkedIn). The alumni network is strong and the career services people are great. They will help you with all this stuff if you put in the work.
     
    I would highly recommend Turing to anyone who is interested in programming as a career. If you’re not sure, go check out a ‘Try Turing’. If you like it, sign up for the program and start preparing right away! 10/10 would enroll again. 
    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Friday, Aug 30 2019
    I'm glad it all worked out for you, Gray! You're right that both (A) the curriculum and structures have improved over time and (B) preparation can make a big difference. 

    On (A), some early students who now mentor have said to me "I don't think I would have passed [given the demands/expectations today]," and they're right. I think we still have a lot to learn/build to make things truly excellent, and I'm excited for some of the changes coming down the pipe in the next few months.

    On (B), we're just about to graduate the first Mod 0 participants and have seen a marked decrease in the repeat and drop-out rates. It's convinced me that technical prep is helpful, but life prep is the most important. People who have their budget, transportation, housing, food, and personal relationships all sorted before they start can really focus 100% and find success. When some of those things are off, people can only put in 90% or 80% of their focus, then they just can't keep up.

    We look forward to seeing where you go from here!
  • Life Changer
    - 1/24/2019
    DW  User Photo
    DW • Frontend Software Developer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I know its been repeated in review after review, but the decision to enroll as a student in Turing's frontend program completely changed my life. To anyone looking to make a career switch into software development, I highly recommend attending the Try Turing weekend to get a feel for the instruction style and atmosphere. It won’t be easy, and it will take everything you’ve got for all 7 months, but if you put in the hard work, the benefits of this program are incredible!

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Friday, Aug 30 2019
    It's great to see you out there on the second job, proving that hard work pays off.
  • Josh Thompson  User Photo
    Josh Thompson • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I graduated from college in 2011 with a major in Political Science and a minor in "International Studies", whatever that is.

    I have never, ever used the "skills" I gained in college. No one has ever asked to look at my resume, or asked me about my college education.

    The skills I gained in Turing, on the other hand, are extremely relevant. I'm now a software developer, and I'm about 1.5 years into my first job.

    I suspect my entire working career will fall into two categories:

    1. Pre-Turing
    2. Post-Turing

    I'm feeling really good about my post-Turing career. I enjoy the work I do every day, and I'm well paid. I have significant growth opportunity in my career, and I have a healthy work-life balance. I can spend time with my wife and family, friends, etc.

    I appreciate what Turing does every day, and contribute time (and money!) to their efforts. I mentor students, I donate to the school, I refer many friends to Turing. To date, FOUR of my friends have gone through the program, and all are equally thrilled with it.

    After I finished Turing, I paid off the $15k I owed for Turing, and the $15k I had left in student loans, in less than a year. Now all the extra income just goes straight to savings.

    I wrote up a bit about my experience here: https://josh.works/turing-retrospective

    I think Turing is a great use of time and money. I strongly suggest you do the work of setting yourself up for success at Turing, across financial and emotional domains. Take out a loan if necessary, but don't try to work a job while in Turing.

    Plan on putting your regular life on hold while at Turing. Work hard to get through the prework, and then some. Work hard, and sleep at least eight hours a day. When you're done, do what they say to get a job, and you'll get a job. Your life will be changed.

    Response From: Jeff Casimir of Turing
    Title: Executive Director
    Friday, Aug 30 2019
    It's one thing to graduate hundreds of developers over the years, but are things better today than they were two or four years ago? Are more doors open? Are grads better trained? The action and energy invested by the alumni network will determine the magnitude of our success. Amongst that network, there are the few who you know are always ready to show up. Panel for new students? Josh is there. Someone needs advice in Slack? Josh is there. Mentor? Josh. Organizing event? Josh.

    Thank you for your tireless commitment to making every next generation successful.
  • Eric Wahlgren-Sauro  User Photo
    Eric Wahlgren-Sauro • Software Engineer Verified via LinkedIn
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I graduated from Turing in June of 2017. I attended the program for eleven months after having repeated two modules. I'm currently at work and want to be quick so if I don't mention something assume it was amazing, 5/5. The professional development I found to be mostly busy work. I already had a LinkedIn set up and in a healthy state. I knew, given my personality, using Twitter wasn't how I was going to find connections and therefore wasn't valuable. College had taught me already how to assemble a decent resume so that wasn't a learning curve. The most valuable part of all the PD was the mod 5 content. I'll link to part 1/3. That put a fire under my butt to really nail my interviews and treat each with great care. Those videos basically showed me to never assume you've made it until you've made it. The only other thing I thought wasn't maximum potent value add were weekly gear up sessions. Every Friday we would take a couple hours to dive in on a topic of controversy and while this is a fun exercise at best you leave it being on the "right" side of the argument and at worst you lose ground with peers and instructors. I think just leaving that off the table for consideration would be a benefit to Turing.

    Briefly, let's talk about the amazing. Turing is hands down, the best education regarding any subject matter I have received. Everyone at the program is there because they want to be and that makes a world of difference in how much effort I put into the work. There are no games around work that can be skipped and work that really matters. No, it all matters and someone has thought deeply about why that content shouldn't end up on the cutting room floor. 

Turing Outcomes


60%
On-Time Graduation Rate
81%
In-Field Employed
$75,000
Median Salary

100% of students intended to seek in-field employment within 180 days of graduating. 0% of students did not intend to seek in-field employment.Below is the 180 Day Employment Breakdown for 67 graduates included in report:

180 Day Employment Breakdown:

Full-time employee
67.2%
Full-time apprenticeship, internship or contract position
9.0%
Short-term contract, part-time, or freelance
1.5%
Started a new company or venture after graduation
3.0%

Employed out-of-field
0.0%
Continuing to higher education
%
Not seeking a job for health, family, or personal reasons
%

Still seeking job in-field
9.0%

Could not contact
7.5%

Salary Breakdown:

100% of job obtainers reported salaries. 2% of job obtainers were hired by the school itself.

Notes & Caveats:

Read the full Turing CIRR report here

Thanks!