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Hack Reactor

Austin, Boulder, Denver, Los Angeles, New York City, Online, Phoenix, San Francisco, San Francisco, Seattle

Hack Reactor

Avg Rating:4.68 ( 262 reviews )

Founded in 2012, Hack Reactor is a 12-week immersive coding school providing software engineering education, career placement services, and a network of professional peers. Hack Reactor has campuses in San Francisco, Austin, Los Angeles, and New York City, as well as an online, remote immersive (full-time and part-time)​. During the first six weeks at Hack Reactor, students learn the fundamentals of development, full stack JavaScript and are introduced to developer tools and technologies. In the final six weeks, students work on personal and group projects, using the skills they have learned, and learning more. After 800+ hours of curriculum, students graduate as full-stack software engineers and JavaScript programmers.

Hack Reactor’s immersive program is known for demanding a starting skill set beyond that of a beginner, so the applicants should allow 2 to 4 months for the admissions process. Applicants should start by enrolling in one of Hack Reactor's free or paid prep programs to learn the basics of JavaScript and prepare for Hack Reactor's technical interview. The technical interview lasts an hour and covers coding problems in JavaScript related to the prep course curriculum. After passing the technical interview, students begin Hack Reactor's 80-hour precourse.

Job preparation is integrated into the curriculum, and students will build an online presence, resume and LinkedIn profile by graduation. Hack Reactor places alumni in mid-to-senior level positions at companies in tech, including Google, Salesforce & Microsoft, with an average graduate salary of $105K (2017 San Francisco student outcomes survey; 81% survey response rate).

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  • Full-Time Software Engineering Immersive

    Apply
    MySQL, AngularJS, MongoDB, HTML, Git, JavaScript, jQuery, CSS, Express.js, React.js, Node.js, Front End
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week12 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$17,980
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationSan Francisco, Austin, Los Angeles, New York City, Denver, Seattle, Phoenix, Boulder, Online
    The Hack Reactor immersive coding bootcamp is focused on building autonomous, fully capable software engineers. Every unit in our curriculum has been pored over numerous times to optimize for educational power and efficiency. The first half of the course is often described as “drinking from a firehose” because of how much information it packs in. In the second half, you use your new skills to build projects, while learning new technologies on the fly. By the end you will be an autonomous engineer, capable of tackling unique, unfamiliar problems and building complex applications.
    Financing
    DepositAfter you have been accepted, a small deposit is required in order to secure your spot in the class.
    Financing
    Around half of our students receive help in financing their Hack Reactor journey. We work with lending companies like SkillsFund and Climb Credit that understand the investment you are making in yourself.
    Tuition PlansFinancing options are available.
    Refund / GuaranteeNo
    Scholarship$1.3MM Hack Reactor Scholarship Fund - visit www.hackreactor.com/scholarships to apply!
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelStudents need to demonstrate they are: fluent with JavaScript fundamentals, able to think like an engineer, are driven learners and empathic communicators. We have a free prep program to help you develop these skills.
    Prep WorkHack Reactor focuses on merit, not prior experience. We provide prep programs for students from any background to study and pass admissions. Take our free self-paced online prep program or a live online prep class to prepare.
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Remote Part-Time Software Engineering Immersive

    Apply
    MySQL, AngularJS, HTML, JavaScript, jQuery, CSS, Express.js, React.js, Node.js, Front End
    OnlinePart Time20 Hours/week36 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$17,980
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationOnline
    Learn full-stack engineering over nine months. Same Hack Reactor curriculum, program and quality - no need to quit your job. Class is held live online with two weeknights and one half-Saturday per week plus required independent study.
    Financing
    DepositAfter you have been accepted, a small deposit is required in order to secure your spot in the class.
    Financing
    Around half of our students receive help in financing their Hack Reactor journey. We work with lending companies like SkillsFund and Climb Credit that understand the investment you are making in yourself.
    Tuition PlansApplicants who would otherwise be unable to attend Hack Reactor may split their tuition into installments and finish paying a portion of tuition up to six months after graduation.
    Refund / GuaranteeNo
    Scholarship$1.3MM Hack Reactor Scholarship Fund - visit www.hackreactor.com/scholarships to apply!
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelStudents need to demonstrate they are: fluent with JavaScript fundamentals, able to think like an engineer, are driven learners and empathic communicators. We have a free prep program to help you develop these skills.
    Prep WorkHack Reactor focuses on merit, not prior experience. We provide prep programs for students from any background to study and pass admissions. Take our free self-paced online prep program or a live online prep class to prepare.
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes

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  • Zac • Hacker in Residence • Graduate
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    A little over six months ago my brother, a developer in SF, pushed this "Heack Reactor Remote Beta" bootcamp at me. He'd pushed various classes at me before, but this was the first I could take it from my home in MN, and with friendly-looking lending partners to help pay for it, I didn't really have any excuse not to apply. So I did. And after cramming the material they emailed me for a couple of weeks, I interviewed and somehow was accepted.

     

    Hack Reactor is one of the best things I have ever done with my life. They took me from someone who was good with computers and kind of knew how to code ("Look, I made it say 'Hello World' in the console!"), to an engineer. Full stop. Tell me what you want me to build. I can build it. The curriculum is fantastic. It makes you fluent in JavaScript by throwing you at real world problems over and over, and giving you just enough help to stay afloat. It was a tough three months, but ultimately I thrived on the challenge. I have yet to start my job search, but I have absolute confidence in my abilities, and I don't expect to be searching long.

     

    I'd also like to take a moment to respond to a couple of the negative reviews left by people who have had issues with the admissions process. It is a tough process. It has to be. The expectations for you on day one at Hack Reactor will be very high. And while the faculty is very supportive, and if they accepted you they have every intention of seeing you to the finish line, the nature of the course is a little sink-or-swim. You will have to perform at a very high level immediately. But the upside is, that by making their admissions process so challenging, they can have confidence in every one of their students.

     

    So I'm sorry that some people have had a bad admissions experience, and it's possible that some aspects could have been handled a little better, but some of what has been said is just blatantly untrue. Most importantly, HR alumni who "can't find a job", are not hired as Hackers in Residence. Hiring decisions for HiRs are made before alumni even graduate. Those who do it are putting off their job search for 3 months, essentially extending their HR curriculum as a sort of paid intern, and the hiring percentages reflect this. It's also worth noting that Fulcrum is guided self-study. That may not be for everyone. On top of that, it sounds like some reviewers did not take full advantage of the resources Fulcrum makes available for extra help. If you do go the Fulcrum route, I highly recommend leaning on your mentors as much as they will allow. Finally, I'd like to say that reimplementing Underscore is writing actual in-use production code. Underscore is a library used by millions of developers. The problems you solve by rebuilding it are far closer to the sorts of problems you will encounter in the wild than most any other curriculum outside of HR proper.

  • Tony L • Applicant
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    I’d like to share my experience in Fulcrum as preparation for the Hack Reactor Onsite interview. I just passed the new interview format today after about a year of trying. I want to encourage other prospective students to keep pushing through even after big setbacks, and I do want to address some concerns that another Fulcrum student posted earlier about their bad experience.

    I have a non-technical background as a graphic designer. It takes me a lot of time and preparation as a complete beginner to understand some of the more complex things about JavaScript, especially solving problems with higher-order functions. I tried to read and solve the problems of Eloquent JavaScript’s chapters 1-5. I found the ramping of knowledge way too high after chapter 3 and really feel the book is for experienced programmers from other languages and not for complete beginners.

    I continued to struggle through Eloquent JavaScript and Codecademy exercises and applied to HR last year. I actually interviewed 3 times last year but didn’t pass. Looking back, I see that my weakness was thinking that being able to define forEach, map, reduce, filter, and reject was enough. That’s basically just the ground floor! You need to be able to solve UNKNOWN toy problems, under a time pressure, and be able to easily recall functional higher-order combinations — all while verbalizing your thoughts, which is very aggravating!

    After Fulcrum came out in late 2015, I joined the program early this year while working part-time. The Fulcrum material is a lot more rigorous than what I encountered in my prior months of self-study. It’s a much higher challenge than all those freebie lessons that litter the Internet. Codecademy and Code School give you a really false sense that you’re ready to go at bootcamps when you absolutely still just have basic understanding. (There’s too much structure and the end-of-unit problems are very easy. Can you remember what you did on those website a few days later? However, I have heard that Codecademy’s Github track is very good, and I do really like Code School’s approach to making programming more accessible.)

    The best thing I found in Fulcrum is the help of the mentors. You can schedule “office hours” with them in 15 minute blocks, and you have to pass their check-ins after key points in the curriculum. (They’re modeled after the tech interview experience, and that kind of accountability to a person who is judging your understanding is something that I don’t think you can experience through just solo studying.) 

    The mentors guided me in understanding things in functional programming that weren’t apparent when I studied on my own last year, like how you cannot break out of a forEach function. It took me several tries to pass some of the check-ins. Knowing that they’re all HR graduates, it was striking how the mentors all demonstrated their extremely high aptitude in JavaScript problem solving techniques. They know what your code is going to produce without running the code in a console! They can immediately find the errors in your thinking and gently help you to reason your way to a solution.

    As an example of the higher difficulty of toy problem you’re expected to solve, the mentors guided me to using combinations of higher order functions to iterate through an unknown amount of arrays to eliminate elements in the first array that are listed in the subsequent arrays. Very tricky stuff, and you need to know how to handle the arguments object with call() and apply().

    These kinds of “combine several concepts” programming challenges are all at a high bar in Fulcrum. They have a “MakerSquare Challenge” collection of toy problems that are pretty challenging, but I was able to solve more and more of them as the weeks went on as I tried to apply the Underbar functions that I wrote. You also get to join a Slack group that has students from all over the world, so I made some friends that were up late at night with me and early in the morning, trying to tease out a clear understanding of the concepts together. Having a community of learners that share your struggle and challenge your progress is extremely motivating!

    So, what about the criticisms of the curriculum? Yes, there are a crapload of slides. If Codecademy is at a middle school level of effort, Fulcrum is like a college level. How do you transfer the deep knowledge of fundamental concepts to brand-new students? Unfortunately, it’s going to take many, many slides to explain things at a comprehensive level. For example, there’s not much articles about execution contexts on the web, but they are explained in the Fulcrum slides as a way to grasp function scopes and why they work the way they do. 

    I do feel bad that the other Fulcrum student had a disappointing experience. I would encourage them and other prospective students to keep upping their game and go through a very high amount of practice. Being able to write every() is a “meet the minimum bar” kind of challenge. It’s part of the Underbar functions that you are required to write from scratch in Fulcrum. You can actually use reduce() to write it, but as I learned from the Fulcrum challenges, you need to combine some(), every(), contains() — and more — to gain mastery in solving unseen and challenging toy problems that prepare you for the interview.

    And no — just because the Underscore library (which Underbar is based on) is available for free on the Internet does not mean that you can understand and use those functions with ease.

    Fulcrum is based on the pre-course work that is required for accepted students who pass the technical interview. If you don’t challenge yourself to completely master the material, then you won’t be ready for the even more difficult and crazy challenges in the immersion program. Keep bulking up your programming muscles so you can feel great about being ready for the intensity! I’d definitely recommend the ReactX functional programming lesson (but that's only the beginning!) and doing at least 50 toy problems on Codewars.com (you should be able to solve some 6 kyu problems!). Some students definitely have a knack for programming and can get away with less. Not me, it took a ton of practice!

    I was past the halfway point in Fulcrum and was given the OK to do another interview. Hack Reactor Onsite changed their interview format recently to something that requires even more concepts to synthesize. I interviewed there a few weeks ago and was extremely discouraged that I didn’t pass. Even after going halfway through Fulcrum and studying for over a year, it wasn’t enough to pass the interview? #JustFeelsBadMang

    When I shared my experience with the Fulcrum director, he said I was really close and should keep trying. I was already satisfied with passing the MakerSquare interview a few days earlier, so I wasn’t going to try yet another interview at HR. But after the boost of encouragement, I studied for 2 more weeks and got word today that I passed the HR interview after 5 tries, even with the new, more difficult format!

    Yes, Fulcrum is a serious commitment of time and money, but it really pushed me beyond what I could achieve on my own. I personally do need actual people (like mentors and other students) to help me master a curriculum. I encourage all prospective students to practice a giant pile of toy problems and to not give up! Thanks for taking the time to read this, and keep on coding and breaking those keyboards!

  • Jason Menayan • Web Developer • Graduate
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    Naturally I can't compare Hack Reactor to other schools since I didn't attend them, but I can tell you about my experience (and I'm not paid to write this, or encouraged or even informed about this site by H/R, frankly). I went from being totally unfulfilled in my prior role in marketing, to thoroughly loving a career as a web developer at a company I adore. 

    The program is exceptionally selective but soon you see why: although people come from diverse backgrounds, at least a good third from non-technical backgrounds, they do structure the admissions process to pick those with a capacity to learn and enthusiasm to do so. The staff is fantastic and just as committed as the students.

    It does feel like you're drinking from a firehose for the first 6 weeks, but it's designed to be intense to get you employment-ready as quickly as possible, and to keep time spent without a paycheck to as short as possible. You learn things and practice them so quickly and often, you do feel comfortable enough with them to start building in the second half, which is where you navigate team dynamics along with putting your skills to use to build something. It's really impressive what many teams end up producing over the course of just a few, super intense weeks.

    Hack Reactor might not be for everyone, but I thought it was incredible and I remain grateful to them for granting me the opportunity to take my career in a different direction and actually enjoy what I'm doing at work.

  • Admissions Fiasco
    - 3/29/2016
    Anonymous • Applicant
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    Being that Hack Reactor's content on this site is "sponsored," I wouldn't doubt that the majority of these posts aren't real.

    I was shuffled around by admissions, which ultimately led to an unfavorable outcome. I applied in December, and did not pass the technical interview. After this, I was advised to join their $3,000 Fulcrum program, which I later found out is the free pre-course work after you get admitted.

    Subsequently, in early January I was offered a free seat with their PTC program, which is hour long sessions with an instructor directly geared toward admission. Gratefully, I signed up.

    About 15 minutes into my first meeting, I revealed that I was enrolled in Fulcrum, and was told I couldn't do both. (I'm still baffled as to why.) Having been in Fulcrum more than a week, I was no longer entitled to a refund, so I had to stick with it.

    Fulcrum's cirruculum is nothing but slides. No classes, or tutorials. Slides, slides, slides. Thousands of them. Seeing how this is geared toward accepted applicants, it proved to be a poor fit for me. I worked through all of their remedial material covering basic object oriented programming, git, and the command line.

    Then you have something called Underbar. All this is, is writing out the most popluar functions from the Underscore.js library. No application or use, just writing them out. Around then I applied a second time, which I admittedly did poorly. I was advised, again, to attend Fulcrum. 

    Instead, I decided to work only towards admission which is, literally, "reciting" part of the Underscore.js libray including Each, Map, Filter/Reject, and Reduce. I worked hard to remember these. 

    About a week ago I took my third try at admission. I did well, seeing how at this point I knew exactly what was discussed in the interview. I got to, what I was told was, the last question. They threw me a whammy, to define Every, and though I was close, I did not get it right. 

    A few days later admissions wrote that I was being given a conditional acceptance, and advised to sign up for PTC............. yet, I was stripped of the opportunity I needed to attend PTC in the first place. It's most likely, that had I been allowed to complete the sessions, I would have been accepted my second time. Instead I got shuffled around for ~4 months in the post-acceptance pre-course work. I'm basically right back where I started.

    It doesn't make any sense to me why a non-accepted student would be advised to pay $3,000 to try their hand at the post-acceptance pre-course work. I inquired to admissions why I was sent on such a long and expensive detour, to which they replied that they were recinding my conditional acceptance. 

    My overall experience was poor, especially after finding out the reason that their job placement is so high (99%) is because if you can't find a job, you work there as a teacher for 3 months. Then you're back on your own. I wouldn't recommend this school to anyone as there are far less expensive options that aren't accepting students based on their ability to memorize and write out the Underscore.js libary. 

  • Anonymous • Applicant
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    I attended their freebie coding session where they barrelled through the basic coding concepts. Starting with 

    1+2

    to 

    writing out basic functions. In 2 hours.

    I'll say now that if it wasn't for the fact that I busted my ass on FreeCodeCamp for a week, I would have been completely lost in those 2 hours. A lot of those in the audience had zero coding experience and I think they were completely confused but genuinely didn't even know what questions to ask because they were that new to coding.

    The problem with having experts who have no pedagogical experience teaching a technical subject is that they lose people - especially newbies - and don't even know (or may not care) - that they're losing folks. 

    This makes places like this a good coding review camp, not a place to learn for the first time. Think of Hack Reactor like an MCAT prep course. If you don't already know bio, chem, ochem, physics, an MCAT prep course is not going to help you learn the material; it'll just frustrate you.

    I personally don't think that's a good value for those who aren't already very familiar with programming. 

    Do FreeCodeCamp and get past the advanced algorithms before evaluating the various boot camps. 

  • Leslie Pajuelo
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    It is more than a coding bootcamp, it's more of a career accelerator with well-rounded support for self-care, team-work, leadership, online presence, resume assistance, mock interviews, interview questions, and perhaps most valuable a network of other bright hard working people in the field.

    What they say is true tho, hard to get into, hard to get through. If you're looking to do a major pivot in life I can't image a better place to do it.

    As for the remote experience, it's easy to connect with people. The first few days are jam packed with activities so getting into the habit of blocking out distractions at home is also easy. People with kids at home managed to block out the time needed.

    Most of the lectures are pre-recorded but there are live sessions for group Q&As plus opportunities to meet with a technical mentor. 

    Now, I didn't trust all the postivie glowing reviews before so here is some negative.

    Some of the videos vary in quality, not sound but what is covered is somewhat uneven. 

    Since they iterate their student wiki and other documents lag behind and are sometimes outdated.

    And I think they could do a better job of emphasizing that 11hrs a day x 6 days is the minimum. That's when you're expected to be participating, however, most people in my group put in extra hours to get through the material. 

    The price.

    Aaand sorry folks that's all I could think of for negatives.

    It's a great program with a high price point but it is a premium product. There's tons of extras beyond the solid technical footing and the remote staff is great about trying to find ways to improve the student experience. 

  • Anonymous • Prospective student • Applicant
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    With HackReactors recent acquisition of Mobile Makers Academy and unveiling of their new branding of Hack Reactor Core; HackReactor is gaining the reputation as a coding bootcamp giant.

    HackReactor has also changed their admissions process making it more selective than it was just six months ago.   The admissions rate has since tumbled.  Is this an attempted in making the Hack Reactor Core the most selective and prestigous bootcamp out there?  With claims of rejecting Harvard CS majors makes one wonder whether the school is moving towards the upper esciolon of exclusitivity. 

    On the flip side HackReactor does spend a kings ransom on admissions and that expense is only increasing.  It is the price of trying to keep true to their original vision of giving everyone a chance to learn how to program.

  • Zach • Graduate
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    Hack Reactor was by far one of the most difficult and rewarding experiences of my life.  The way I approach learning has been fundamentally changed by my experiences at Hack Reactor.

    I can't stress this enough, but be prepared to work incredibly hard. Attending Hack Reactor doesn't automatically make you a great programmer.  Think of Hack Reactor as a multiplier.  The more effort you put in the better your results will be. Hack Reactor is going to give you a laser focus on what to learn and how to approach it, but it's ultimately up to you to learn the material and apply it.

    It's going to be challenging.  There's going to be moments where you doubt your self and what you're doing. But if you make it your goal to put 100% of your effort in everyday and cotinue striving to get better each day, then Hack Reactor will absolutely help you develop the tools become a phenomenal software engineer.

  • Cliff Saporta Cheng • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    TL;DR - If you are accepted into Hack Reactor and you are serious about making a career in software engineering, then any other choice is sub-optimal. And yes, you will get a job.

    If you're reading this, then there's a good chance you're in the same position I was in a few months ago. I was someone who was very interested in making the career switch into software engineering, (previously taught high school math for 8 years) and wondered about coding bootcamps as a way to go since I wasn't in a position to go back to school for another formal degree. Like you're probably doing now, I was looking at the fact that literally every review for Hack Reactor was incredibly positive and glowing, and wondered if this could possibly be real. 

    Long story short - it is most definitely real. There is a very good reason why Hack Reactor markets itself as an Advanced Software Engineering Immersive, rather than as a coding bootcamp. Hack Reactor doesn't teach you how to write code - anyone can learn to do that to some extent off "Hello World" tutorials on the internet. Hack Reactor teaches you real, industry-applicable software engineering principles, then puts you to work in building real projects alongside your incredibly supportive, driven, talented, and knowledgeable peers. 

    I was part of the Remote Beta 7 cohort, and overall, I would have to say that it was an amazing experience. The quality of my peers in the cohort always pushed me to learn more, and everyone had a genuinely great time interacting and working with each other. The thing I was probably most surprised by was how connected I felt to everyone in the program, even though everything was done remotely. Between the countless hours spent together in Zoom lectures, Google Hangouts while working on sprints and projects, and shooting the breeze all day in Slack chat, I honestly think I probably got to know more people than I would have from doing the on-site program. So if anyone is worried that they would get a watered-down experience by doing the Remote program, I can assure you that is not at all true.

    There are so many other great reviews on Hack Reactor that break down some of the details about the program that you might want to know, so I won't get into that. Instead, I'm going to answer the biggest question I had when deciding to take the plunge to leave my old career and take this leap of faith.

    Will you get a job?

    Hack Reactor will say, "We can't promise or guarantee any particular job outcomes." But just between you and me, YES YOU WILL GET A JOB! How do I know? I just graduated from HRR7 on September 26, and I had multiple offers to choose from, and finally signed with a company exactly 20 days after I started sending out applications. It still blows me away that less than 4 months ago, I had absolutely no professional software development experience, and yet this Monday I will be starting off as a mid-level software engineer. And while the exact timing of everyone's job search will differ, I know that my experience is not necessarily atypical. Hack Reactor gets results for their students, period.

    If you're going to make this kind of investment in yourself, in terms of time/money/blood/sweat/tears, then you owe it to yourself to do Hack Reactor. There are many different choices out there, but there is not a better choice.

  • Kamerynn Harrah • Graduate
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    I recently graduated from Remote Beta and have begun the interview process.

    Before the program, I was hacking together horrible bits of Javascript to get by at my previous job. I didn't have much programming experience, nor did I have a CS degree.

    Yesterday, I had an interview with a tech company with very smart engineers. They asked difficult technical questions, two engineers at a time, for hours.

    I killed it. I was absolutely amazed at how much I had learned in 3 months. Do not underestimate Hack Reactor - you will have to work very hard, but the amount of support given by HR staff and the feeling of community in the program is tremendous, and I'm convinced there's no better way to become a software developer.

     

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    I was originally hesitant to attend the bootcamp, especially with the price tag. I had enough saved up to attend the bootcamp but I was worried about affording to live in San Francisco. Luckily, I took the leap (and I'm 100% sure I made the right choice!).

    I paid off the tuition with my savings and I crowdfunded a loan using WeFinance.co for my living expenses. Best (and toughest) 3 months of my life.

    The people there were great, I learned a lot, and they have an AMAZING network. When people refer to it as the "Harvard of coding bootcamps" it's not an understatement. People who attend basically have their choice of jobs.

    If you're on the fence, make the jump.

  • Wesley • Student
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    Hack Reactor is the power suit to your learning, allowing you to accomplish so much more than you could as a mere human. But don't be mistaken - you are very much the driver at all times. One of the most important deciding factors for being accepted into HR is the ability to learn independently and work through new challenges.

    Don't expect things to be done for you. There are plenty of resources for technical help and team conflicts. HR provides all the controls and levers for you to use, but it is up to you to use them. At the end of the day, HR is not like a traditional school in that it is not obligated to force feed you knowledge. Based on my experience, HR has done a tremendous job of accepting students that can take responsibility for their education. For the most part, these are people that have been doing a fair bit of learning on their own for some time, so it's not a real surprise.

    I had a great time knowing and working with all the super-smart students in my cohort. If you ever join HR, you will probably hear legends of this amazing cohort (probably not, but maybe). The best part is that the staff is constantly looking for ways to iterate on the program and improve it to make it better. Not only is HR a program to prepare software engineers for work, it is very much an ongoing engineering project in itself. Expect the unexpected, and be prepared to adapt - as you would when working in tech as a developer.

    I haven't had experience with any other programs, so I can't compare HR to them. All I can say is that HR works. Plenty of peeps getting jobs, with or without prior professional programming experience.

     

     

  • Jonathan Mason • Graduate
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    Yes, this is going to be another glowing review, and there are so very many others that you can read to confirm, so I'm going to go ahead and speak nothing on the course content and job search support, which are nothing short of excellent. Instead I'm going to tell you about a different reason that you will be successful after going through the remote experience, the people. 

    I'm not speaking solely of the staff, who are 100% invested in your personal growth and success both within the program and beyond, but also of the students who, though they must change from cohort to cohort, will always be the type of people you will love to collaborate with and learn from. Having peers that challenge and motivate you is one of the less touted features of the Hack Reactor experience, but one I believe to be very worthy of mention. 

    As a final note, keep in mind that this review comes as the Remote program is still growing, therefore you can only expect your experience to be better than those who have come before you. The curriculum is constantly updated, and the alumni support is evolving as well. I'm certain that if you choose Remote Beta, you will not regret it.  

  • Owen Dismuke • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    When deciding how best to advance my software engineering career, I faced many choices. Ultimately, I decided on the Advanced Software Engineering Immersive at Hack Reactor. After passing my second technical interview (yeah, it's to that level) and finishing my pre course work, I embarked on the best three months of solid, intensive learning. 

    I set the bar high before I started. Hack Reactor just laughed as we passed the bar in the first few weeks. If you are passionate about coding as a lifestyle and want to make lifelong friends with your cohort-mates, class leads, tech mentors, and Hack Reactor staff, apply!

  • Changed my life
    - 9/4/2015
    Albert Tang • Graduate
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    Before Hack Reactor I was making minimum wage. One week before graduation I received an on-site interview and three weeks later I received the offer: six-figure salary, 40 hour work week, public company, great culture.

    I can easily say it changed my life.

    But if your plan is just to study hard for the acceptance and cruise you will be disappointed.

  • Shanan Sussman • Full-Stack Software Engineer • Graduate
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    When I first applied to Hack Reactor, I was a little sceptical of all the claims made by HR in terms of job placement and experience. It was also a rather large financial commitment and so I was doubly concerned. But going in for the interview and seeing the school radically shifted all those perceptions. The place was a abuzz with activity and seemingly endless students working on cool stuff.

    Going through the actual program was no different. It was easily one of the most challenging and productive 3 months of my life. It pushed me in new ways I honestly didn't know that I was capable of and without question think it was one of the best life decisions i've made. 

    It's a pretty special place and I'm incredibly glad that I got to take a part in it!

  • Austin Liu • Graduate
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    Hack Reactor was my second computer science training experience. My first was getting my CS degree from CSU Hayward (now called CSU Eastbay). The breadth of material covered and the fostering of community and class bonding was excellent, however, I must admit the intensity was a bit high for me. Not having my Saturdays to myself for three months wore me out, but I survived. Be aware before joining that the pace is really quick and there is not as much review and follow-up on material that has been covered; if you fall behind, you'll need to catch up in the little remaining time you have with the mentors they offer or other resources you might find. This can be rather difficult. I was most impressed by how much job hunt / interviewing / resumé prep they offer, and the alumni resources are world-class. I learned a lot about working with teams of other developers, something that my college CS courses never taught me. Over-all, I recommend it, but only if you are hard working, work well with others, are very smart, and can endure this kind of environment.

    Be aware that the cirriculum is JavaScript centric; while this positions you well for many of the jobs out there, and certainly teaches you enough CS, you may need to learn many other technologies such as Python or Ruby if what you're aiming for is the center of the web application development job distribution histogram.

  • Richard kho • Hacker in Residence @ Hack Reactor • Graduate
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    TL;DR - this was the single greatest experience of my life. I have zero regrets and would do it all over again.

    The overall goal of Hack Reactor is not to "get you a $105k+ job". The fact is, you are in charge of your destiny. Your education at Hack Reactor revolves around becoming an autonomous learner. Your goal is to learn software engineering, not memorize Javascript frameworks and libraries. 

    For the first six weeks, you're going to deep dive into lectures and pair programming sprints. It's a total immersion in software engineering: you tackle data structures, algorithm challenges, MVC frameworks, servers, databases, deployment, and much more. If this seems overwhelming, don't be worry - we're in this together.

    Your support comes in the form of the instruction staff, technical mentors, class shepherds and leads, and most importantly your fellow peers. For the last thirteen weeks (twelve + solo week), I have spent over 800 hours with the same ~64 peers. I have never felt more supported and engaged before.

    The second half of your time is defined by three group projects and the most intense, informative, and useful job search preparation I have ever encountered. There's a very different dynamic between the first and second half portions of the course and a common complaint is the perception of a lack of support during it, but I feel like that's simply unreasonable -- especially when you have all of your peers to lean on. Your group projects are intended to simulate real world work environments and help you learn  workflow, deployment, testing, continuous integration, and overall working with a team.

    The job search support at Hack Reactor is second to none. We spent several days working on our resumes, iterating over them and improving them over and over again. By the time I was finished, my resume looked so much better than when I started, and I like to think that I used to have a good grasp at writing resumes. There's a sprint where we do the same for cover letters. The support continues with mock interview sessions, endless whiteboarding, and lectures on jobs search and interview strategy. I feel like the job search support at Hack Reactor is worth the price of admission alone. 

    I have officially spent twenty weeks on Hack Reactor's curriculum so far - eight on the pre-course, twelve on-site. I also started the first of my twelve-week residency with the program this week. I loved my experience so much and wanted to give back to this community. I'm excited for my peers who are well into their job search and can't wait to see where they end up within these next twelve weeks.

    If you've read this far and are still thinking about attending Hack Reactor, just go for it. You're going to have the best time of your life while working towards a career change.

     
  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    Hack Reactor manages to exceed expectations every step of the way, from admissions through the alumni program. The staff here is relentlessly passionate about cultivating and iterating on the curriculum, technical mentorship, space operations, student outcomes, hiring team, and the alumni program. Hack Reactor is on a rocket ship trajectory, and I'm infinitely thankful I jumped on board.

  • Anthony • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    I am a graduate of another coding bootcamp (Metis 13 Ruby on Rails Immersive) as well as HackReactor. I can confidently say that HackReactor is easily 10x higher quality than the other bootcamp I went to. I have never been to any educational institution that has the attention to detail that HackReactor has. Absolutely outstanding experience.

  • Kelly • Graduate
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    It's extremely hard for me to fully express what sort of a difference this program has made in my life and, indeed, in the lives of people around me. 

    I had my reservations early on and not every single day at Hack Reactor went smoothly. There were moments of struggle, anxiety and deep, deep self doubt. There were times when it felt outright painful, especially when combined with the fatigue and separation from loved ones.

    That said, there were even more moments of pure exhilaration. You know that warm, elated feeling you get when your brain is actively engaged in the process of learning something new and exciting and wonderful? Hack Reactor was essentially 800 hours of that feeling.

    I come from some programming experience. I wrote some code in high school, dabbled as a hobbyist through college and graduate school and then actually worked for a couple of years maintaining a large code base for a eComm company. In spite what amounts to several years of experience over time, it's completely dwarfed by what I learned at Hack Reactor.

    Finally, in terms of tangibles - Hack Reactor isn't blowing sunshine up your stack when they tout their numbers. Those are the real deal. I've been on the job market for less than three weeks after graduation (I was in HR19), and from week 1 onward I had the problem of having more interviews than I could sanely handle. Think about that - I don't know about the rest of you, but in all the industries I've worked in, I've never once had more interviews than I could reasonably manage. After 2 and a half weeks, I have 2 amazing offers from companies I would give my front teeth to work for and likely more on the way. It still doesn't fully feel real to me.

    If you get into Hack Reactor, go to Hack Reactor. Yeah, it's expensive. Yeah, it's tough to find lodging in San Francisco. I don't care, find a way.

    5/5 stars, would attend again.

  • Walker Mellema • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    About me: I'm a mid-life career changer. I have a BA in Geography from Berkeley and an MBA from UT Austin. I started taking undergraduate programming classes a few years ago, thinking I'd get another Master's degree (in CS) and eventually a job as a software engineer. After a few semesters I got lucky and got an entry level job as a junior programmer. It was good experience, but the pay was WELL below average for a junior engineer and the tech stack was aging rapidly (a mix of C#/.NET, MS SQL, JS, jQuery). Even worse, I wasn't working with experienced engineers (always work with the smartest people you can find, you'll learn faster and become a better programmer) and the company was more interested in pushing new features out the door than producing high quality software.

    So, after a year I started thinking about how to put my career on a different trajectory. I wanted to work with sharp engineers using the latest technology and best practices to write awesome code. I stumbled upon developer bootcamps, did some research, and decided to take a chance. I applied to Dev Bootcamp, App Academy, and Hack Reactor, all in San Francisco. The job market is starving for engineers in the Bay Area and it's by far the largest concentration (10X any other place) of engineering jobs in the country, so it seemed like the best place to be looking for a job after graduation. 

    App Academy seemed like the lowest risk, because you don't pay until you land a programming job, but they turned me down. Hack Reactor was interesting because of their focus on full-stack Javascript. Most of the other schools I looked at were teaching Ruby, although there were a few that taught in Python. Javascript is on a growth trajectory right now. It's embedded as THE front end language of the Internet, and a few years ago Node.js came on the scene (server-side JS) and since then there's been an explosion of new tools and libraries enabling full-stack JS development. Anyway, I made it through the tech interview (you have to study a LOT before you even get accepted to Hack Reactor), and when they accepted me I decided to take the plunge.

    I quit my job in Austin, moved to San Francisco and spent 3 months, 70-80 hours per week doing nothing but studying software engineering, Javascript, and JS-related subjects like Node.js, AngularJS, Backbone, and MongoDB. Hack Reactor's primary focus is to teach you how to be a SOFTWARE ENGINEER, Javascript is just the language they chose to teach in. You also learn core engineering concepts like data structures, algorithms and algorithmic complexity/performance, and a lot more. It was an intense learning experience. You cannot master all of the material they expose you to. You'll spend your whole career trying to do that.

    In my opinion, these are the things that make Hack Reactor an excellent bootcamp.

    1) People: The instructors are all experienced, highly skilled engineers. They could be making a lot more money as engineers. They are dedicated to making HR the best bootcamp in existence, and producing top-notch engineers. They worked longer hours than the students did. The students are also great. HR accepts less than 10% of applicants and they are really good at choosing students you want to be around. You're going to spend all your waking hours with these students for 3 months, so you really want them to be people you like to work with.

    2) Philosophy: HR strives for continuous improvement. They take feedback from students every week and change the program every "semester" to make it better. I spoke to HR graduates from the previous year who were a little jealous because the program had grown significantly and included additional topics that weren't covered when they were students. I'm sure I'll feel the same way about the program next year when I see what HR has become in a few more cycles.

    3) Job Placement: The entire second half of the program is designed to make you employable. You switch from learning concepts and building small individual projects to working on teams, building bigger projects, learning how to succeed in tech interviews, etc. By the time you get to Hiring Day, where you get to meet hiring managers from roughly 30 companies, you have a substantial GitHub portfolio, a good story to tell, and an excellent chance of landing a job. They also have an alumni program/network, and when it's time to look for your NEXT job, they help with that too. It's too early too tell, but it feels like it's going to be a long-term relationship as my career develops.

    There's a lot more I could say about how awesome HR is, but this covers the highlights. I had a great experience, made some good friends, and landed a great job at a startup in SF about a month after I graduated.

    Before you get into one of these bootcamps, you're on the outside looking in, reading all of the marketing material on their websites, and asking yourself "Is it really worth it? Will I get a good job after I graduate? Which school should I apply to?". HR's website states their job placement rate is 99%. That sounds too good to be true, but it's not. ALL of the students who graduated from my class found jobs within 3 months. Most of them had never worked as a software engineer before. I could not be happier with my experience at Hack Reactor and I recommend it highly.

  • Anonymous • Software Engineer - ClassDojo • Graduate
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    Hack Reactor was, in a word, awesome.  I was incredibly impressed by their ability to deliver all that they promised.  Below are some of what I believe are their greatest strengths.

    • Class Quality - Hack Reactor's admissions are very selective.  Everyone entering the class has a good understanding of the basics of programming.  It's not a 0-60 program.  As someone with several years of prior programming experience (though none of it professional), this made it a great fit.  No time was spent on basic concepts like loops and conditionals.
    • Instructors - The lead instructors are incredibly rigorous in their teaching, and spend a lot of time refining their style.  The dedication shown was beyond that of any teacher of professor I'd had before.
    • Freedom - Much of the course is spent on independent projects, and even the structured assignments are highly customizable, with lots of extra credit.  This allows students to delve deep into their favored interests, and there will always be at least one knowledgable staff member who can help.
    • Job Assistance - We get a lot of practice with our interviews, and great inside tips on applications, resumes, and negotiations.  I would have been lost without all of this personal attention.

    Hack Reactor was a wonderful, transformative experience, and I wouldn't be where I am today without it.

  • Charles Holbrow • Research Assistant • Graduate
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    Hack reactor was am briliant fit for me... I'd done lots of programming on my own time... I took a few classes in college, but there were a lot of basics that I was missing: Algorithms, Data Structures, Big O Notation, closures, functional scope.

    Hack Reactor really cemented these patterns in my mind, and I'm much more confident with my programming skills. I'm a grad student at MIT now, and I've had some of the best teachers around -- but no experience quite compares with Hack Reactor.

  • Do it.
    - 10/28/2014
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    There are a few moments when you know your life forever changed. Hack Reactor creates one of those, sharply increasing your career trajectory and forging valuable friendships.

    I applied to H/R because I knew I love to program, but wasn't satisfied with 'working my way up to software engineer over 3-5 years.' It's been the best decision I've made.

    You will learn CS fundamentals, lots of frameworks, product engineering, and much more during an incredibly short time period where you'll work extremely hard.

    The people who seemed to get the most from our cohort were the ones who stayed late, got drinks after, and generally bonded around the pain and euphoria of bending machines to our will.

    I can't recommend Hack Reactor enough. If they accept you, go; you'll thank yourself a few short months later.

Thanks!