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Tech Elevator

Cincinnati, Cleveland, Cleveland, Columbus, Detroit, Online, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh

Tech Elevator

Avg Rating:4.96 ( 239 reviews )

Tech Elevator is an immersive 14-week coding bootcamp with tracks in Java and .NET. Their mission is to elevate people, companies, and communities. Students will learn from instructors who have an average of 20 years of experience working in the field and will gain an understanding of the foundational computer science concepts and theory necessary for a professional software developer, with special emphasis on practical application, techniques, and tools. Students in both the Java and .NET tracks will also learn client-side web programming including Javascript, JQuery, Bootstrap, Web services, XML, JSON. In the .NET track, students will also be exposed to C#. For the final capstone project, students will work together on a business project, building a fully-functional app using either Java or .NET. 

In addition to the classroom hours, students will get 20+ hours of career sessions through the Pathway Program™, which focuses on developing soft skills and connecting you to the right companies through events like Employer Matchmaking. Career coaches and mentors will help with resume building, interview coaching, strengths assessment and more. The team will work with students from the start of the program to ensure they don't just get a job as a programmer, but that they are on a fulfilling, rewarding career path. 

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  • Java Coding Bootcamp

    Apply
    HTML, Git, JavaScript, ASP.NET, jQuery, CSS, Java, SQL
    OnlineFull Time40 Hours/week14 Weeks
    Start Date None scheduled
    Cost$15,500
    Class size18
    LocationOnline
    Course topics include: Introduction to programming in Java, Serverside programming in Java, Database programming in Java, Java frameworks and design patterns, and Client-side web programming (Javascript, JQuery, Bootstrap, Web services, XML, JSON).
    Financing
    Deposit$125
    Financing
    Financing available through Sallie Mae or SkillsFund
    Tuition Plans$7,750 due on day 1 of the bootcamp, $7,750 due in week 8 of the bootcamp
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep Work30-40 hrs
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
  • Java Coding Bootcamp

    Apply
    HTML, Git, JavaScript, ASP.NET, jQuery, CSS, Java, SQL
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week14 Weeks
    Start Date September 14, 2020
    Cost$15,500
    Class size18
    LocationDetroit, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh
    Course topics include: Introduction to programming in Java, Serverside programming in Java, Database programming in Java, Java frameworks and design patterns and Client side web programming (Javascript, JQuery, Bootstrap, Web services, XML, JSON).
    Financing
    Deposit$125
    Financing
    Financing available through Sallie Mae or SkillsFund
    Tuition Plans$7,750 due on day 1 of the bootcamp, $7,750 due in week 8 of the bootcamp
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep Work30-40 hrs
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    September 14, 2020 - Detroit
    September 14, 2020 - Philadelphia
    September 14, 2020 - Pittsburgh
    September 14, 2020 - Cleveland
    September 14, 2020 - Cincinnati
    September 14, 2020 - Columbus
  • .NET Coding Bootcamp

    Apply
    HTML, Git, C#, JavaScript, .NET, ASP.NET, jQuery, CSS, SQL
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week14 Weeks
    Start Date September 14, 2020
    Cost$15,500
    Class size18
    LocationCincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Pittsburgh
    Course topics include: Introduction to programming in C#/.NET, Serverside programming in C#/.NET, Database programming in C#/.NET, C#/.NET frameworks and design patterns and Client side web programming (Javascript, JQuery, Bootstrap, Web services, XML, JSON).
    Financing
    Deposit$125
    Financing
    Financing available through Sallie Mae or SkillsFund
    Tuition Plans$7,750 due on day 1 of the bootcamp, $7,750 due in week 8 of the bootcamp
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
    Prep Work30-40 hrs
    Placement TestYes
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    September 14, 2020 - Columbus
    September 14, 2020 - Cincinnati
    September 14, 2020 - Cleveland
    September 14, 2020 - Pittsburgh
  • James "Jacob" Bennett  User Photo
    James "Jacob" Bennett • Programmer Analyst • Student Verified via LinkedIn
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    My prior experience with jobs was basically only sales and being a substitute teacher. I always wanted to get in the tech field and I was so desperate, I would have done anything! I just never had an opportunity to explore it. I kept recieving emails back from companies saying I dont have enough experience and because I couldn't even get in the door, I will never have tech experience. I then came across Tech Elevator which at first glipse seemed suspicious. "Really? Change my career in 14 weeks? Yea Right!". But I kept thinking about it and could not stop but wonder what this could do for me.

    I knew that if I was going to do this, I would never give up because this could be my life changing moment. I applied and got in. This opportunity was extremely difficult but I invested everything into it and it paid off. I was getting there at 8 A.M. and not leaving sometimes until 10 P.M. In the end, I knew what I put in is what I am going to get out. The staff there is amazing and they do not get enough credit. This was one of my hardest and best decisions of my career and of my life. I now have a career in tech!

    Thank you Tech Elevator!!!

  • Bakhary Drummond  User Photo
    Bakhary Drummond • Software Developer I • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    3 Things you should ask before considering this program:

    1. Am I ready to change my life in 14 weeks (or less!)?
    2. Can I commit to learning as much as I can from this program?
    3. Do I enjoy being surrounded by people with a passion for learning and uplifting others?

    I answered yes to all three, and here's my experience:

    I learned about Tech Elevator just a few weeks after learning some basic JavaScript and utilizing online tools such as freecodecamp.org. Even though I'd read their great reviews online and even heard from associates of former graduates, I was hesitant to join a program off the beaten path of attending a 4 year institution coming from the hospitality industry, but after visiting an open house event and speaking with the instructors, I was convinced that Tech Elevator was not only the smart choice for someone like me, it was the best choice.

    The staff at Tech Elevator are genuine and supportive no matter what their role or daily interaction with you. Kelly, the Pathway Program Director was such an integral part of my education and preparation for entering the field of software development despite not helping me write one line of code. She worked tirelessly with me as well as 35 other students in my cohort to craft clean, polished, and professional LinkedIn profiles and resumes that highlighted our experiences and new skills. 

    I was in the .NET class of Cohort 8. Our instructor Josh was literally the best teacher I have ever had. He explains all of the concepts in a way that makes you feel like you knew them all along. Everytime I stepped into his classroom, the energy and dedication he put into each of his lessons motivated me to learn more.

    This was by no means an easy 14 weeks. At times I was unsure I was going to learn enough to get a job after graduation. With lots of help from Marty, the campus director, Kelly, and the instructors, I honed my skills and recieved a job offer after the first round of Matchmaking interviews. 

    I'm so grateful for all the help and support I recieved at Tech Elevator and I highly recommend anyone who's interested in a career in software development or even software in general to attend.  

  • Mason Kamolpechara  User Photo
    Mason Kamolpechara • Programmer/Analyst • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    TLDR: If you do everything the program asks of you, I would be very surprised if you don't get a tech job within a month of graduation. If you skip exercises, don't bother going back to concepts you didn't understand, don't network, don't practice interviews/whiteboarding/elevator pitch, etc, you can still graduate, but you might not get your money's worth. But even then, you still have a good chance of getting a job.

    You will get at least what you put into this program. People come into the program at all levels: some people come in with a wealth of coding experience but need some job help while others come in with no coding experience and are willing to take the plunge into the unknown. Regardless of where you're at, the program will 100% help you get a job if you're willing to put in the work. One previous response is absolutely correct in that you could be lazy and still graduate by stealing code or not finishing exercises or skipping interview practices or skipping over difficult concepts. But why would anyone want to drop more than 15 grand just to lie to themselves and their instructors? All you're doing is hurting yourself when it comes to do real interviews, and they're what actually matter. 

    As far as the actual instruction, both the coursework and the instructors are excellent. I was honestly moved by the amount of time and effort the instructors are willing to put into their students. If you don't understand something, they will work with you until you do. If you have a good grasp on all the material covered, you shouldn't have too many problems getting through most technical interviews.

    I found the most valuable part of Tech Elevator to be Pathways Program. The biggest and most important thing they do is help you network, especially the matchmaking days. Tech Elevator will give you the chance to have face-to-face time with ~8 companies and provide you with the contact information of ~30. Make use of this. I cannot stress this enough. One misconception is that you Matchmaking is all about the face-to-face time. While matching is without a doubt a huge advantage, you can still email companies you liked but didn't get matched with. I didn't even speak with the company I'm working for at Matchmaking--I just applied and emailed the contact person listed. That list of 30+ professional contact emails is probably worth a fortune in of itself. In addition to the networking, the opportunities for professional interview/whiteboarding feedback were invaluable and the constant work on my elevator pitch really helped me answer the quesion asked at every single interview I ever did: "Tell me a little bit about yourself."

    Overall, I would recommend Tech Elevator to anyone willing to treat the program as a real job. As long as you can put in a ton of hours to understand concepts you don't get at first (or second or third or fourth) and make use of all the meetups, interview practices, and contact information provided, I'd be very surprised if you couldn't get a job within a couple weeks of graduation. Anyone with questions can feel free to find me on LinkedIn and I'd be happy to oblige.

  • Nabiel  User Photo
    Nabiel • Developer I • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Tech Elevator was an awesome experience.  In my time there I acquired the skills necessary to transition into a career as a developer.  I had a slight background in programming Java but had only worked as an IT specialist.  After reading the reviews online about Tech Elevator and hearing of their extremely high job placement rate I ended up leaving college and attending this boot camp on a whim.  It was definitely not a mistake.  I was fortunate enough to have a job offer a month before graduation after the first matchmaking event.

    If you get accepted I HIGHLY recommend attending the next available cohort.  I was in the .NET class and I can say Josh is an amazing instructor.  He had a way of explaining things which made things clear and easy to follow.  That being said you will spend a lot of time coding over the course of the 3.5 months you are attending and it will be very challenging.   However if you work hard each and every day and have the drive to keep pushing yourself you will have no problem completing the program.  Don't be discouraged.  Although it's a lot of work it's also a lot of fun.  You will meet a lot of great connections, both students and employers / developers.

    Kelly, the pathway director, will also pave the way for you to find a great career.  She works very diligently and honestly cares deeply for the students to pursue work in the IT field.  A HUGE part of their very impressive job placement rate is because of her hard work and dedication.   She will help you build an amazing resume / LinkedIn profile, set up mock interviews for you, or even just give you a pep talk if you need it.

  • A great Program
    - 9/17/2018
    Brian Mulh  User Photo
    Brian Mulh • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I can't say enough good things about Tech Elevator.  I came in with almost no experience and after 14 weeks accepted a job as a software engineer.  While I still have so much to learn I feel the curriculum was a great starting point.  The instructors are all great and always willing to help.  Even on weekends they will usually respond in minutes to any questions.  After graduating, I have reached out and they have responded quickly to my questions.  The program is also great in helping you get a job.  They will help you prepare for interviews and also bring in hiring companies to interview with.  While they do as much as they can to prepare you for a job, you won't just be handed a job.  If you do the bare minimum and just try to skate by the 14 weeks then getting a job might be more difficult than some of the other students.  I would make sure to try to do extra work on the side to set yourself apart.  This is a great program and I would recommend it highly, but don't expect it to be easy or that you will get a great job just because you made it through.  While you can easily get a great job, you better be prepared to dedicate all your time to this program for 14 weeks.

  • Sacha Sade  User Photo
    Sacha Sade • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I came from a 10-year career in HR and had the opportunity to work at a few different tech companies, being either directly or indirectly involved in hiring software developers at three.

    Long story short, I knew for a while that I wanted to move from HR into software development, but it wasn’t realistic for me to go back to school for another degree. Eventually, my family was relocated from Atlanta to Columbus and after struggling to find an HR job here that aligned with my experience and values, I came to the conclusion that Tech Elevator would be my ticket into software development.   

    Like a lot of people, I did a ton of research and talked to former TE grads and ultimately decided to do it. The program is designed to set you up with the tools to graduate as a junior-level full stack developer and I feel I got exactly what I paid for in that respect. I started at zero and learned so much but truly, the thing that sets Tech Elevator apart from other bootcamps is the relationships they have forged with employers, which as I’ll explain below, wouldn’t be possible if the curriculum wasn’t legit. Those relationships aren’t just the result of marketing, they are built on the reputations of the students who graduate and get hired.

    I applied to TE and was set to start mid-January this year when a family emergency pulled me out of state and a subsequent job offer in my old field came up that would allow me the extra time I needed in January to handle my stuff so I accepted it. I was already regretting my decision when my Director of Engineering told me how awesome the 3 guys he hired from Tech Elevator are (each had been in place for about 6 months) and that he’d absolutely look to TE for his junior developer needs going forward. Those were the final words I needed to hear, so I reached back out to the team to see if there was a seat left for me in cohort 5 and thankfully I got back in! If that director’s words weren’t enough, on my first day of class, I found out that one of Columbus’s large employers who also happens to have hired a large number TE grads over multiple cohorts was actually sending a group of their current employees to learn Java alongside us. That fact speaks for itself; employers believe in what they get from Tech Elevator.

    In terms of my experience during the program, Brian was my instructor and is truly, truly awesome. He is so dedicated to his students, so supportive, really organized, incredibly smart, has a ton of work experience, and can figure out where you’re going wrong very easily. He’s also available way beyond class and office hours to help over TE’s internal messaging app. All of the instructors are around after class for office hours and are available to help all of the students, and will try to help you out even if they are teaching a different language. Everyone is so helpful and supportive and they all really care about your success.

    The Campus Director and Pathway Program Director are a former HR professional and technical recruiter respectively and as a former HR professional myself, I can tell you that they both absolutely know what they are talking about when it comes to the elevator pitch’s structure and importance and the guidance they give on resumes and interviewing. The Pathway Program is spot on.  

    During matchmaking I met with 9 companies and received offers from two before graduation. I believe I was really close to an offer from a third when I removed myself from the process after having accepted one of the offers I received. A fourth company I met with was interviewing for a future hiring class (as many large orgs do for junior roles), and judging by the reaction I got when I informed them I accepted an offer, I feel that I may have been a strong candidate for that future class as well. A fifth company is still in touch with me to keep our relationship warm as I gain experience (although I am super happy with where I ended up). In terms of the types of positions available, all 9 of the companies I interviewed with were hiring software developers, although the third company was leaning toward a database maintenance position for me, I think because they were looking for more of a heavy hitter for their developer role.

    In summary, it was an awesome experience and very, very much worth the money. I feel great about what I have learned and I feel awesome about my new career and my new company. Thank you, Tech Elevator!

     

     

  • The Real Deal
    - 9/9/2018
    Timothy Hart  User Photo
    Timothy Hart • QA Analyst • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    If you are looking to join a coding bootcamp, I would highly recommend Tech Elevator.  I graduated this August and had a very good experience. The instructors are very knowledgeable and extremely helpful.  The Pathway program does an incredible job of helping you learn how to present yourself to future employers.

    If there is a catch to the program, it is that nothing is handed to you.  As good as the number are for job placements, if you do not put in the effort, you will have a very difficult time.  Tech Elevator gives you all the tools you need but you have to personally put in the work to succeed.

     
  • Melissa Petrov  User Photo
    Melissa Petrov • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I can’t say enough positive things about this program. I was a stay at home mama for the last almost five years and was incredibly nervous about starting a career for the first time. I have a degree in Communications but zero experience. I had zero background in coding as well. 

    To start off the instructors at Tech Elevator are beyond talented and caring. It truly blows my mind how brilliant they are. John made class exciting every day or at least tried to and he is always there if you need the extra support or help. Before leaving everyday he makes sure to ask if anyone needs assistance before heading out and he’s right there when you message him a question on his own free time. He truly is there to see you succeed. He is always asking what he can do to make the experience better. 

    The Pathway Program was EXTREMELY helpful, from helping craft a resume, to mock interviews, to matchmaking where they help you make connections (which is ultimately what helped me secure a second interview, third interview and ultimately a new career). I didn’t know where to begin when it came to job searching and my technical interview skills needed a lot of practice. They provide all the help and support that you need. Katie and Ben know their stuff. Listen and do it. 

    I am very thankful for the opportunity to work with such talented people and to be part of Tech Elevator. The program is tough (really tough....I was on the struggle bus a lot of the cohort), but it is more than worth it. I did my research before applying because it all seemed too good to be true but now having gone through the program, they have a FIVE STAR review/rating for a reason. As one of my classmates told me when I started to doubt myself....”Trust the process.”

  • Aref Jadallah  User Photo
    Aref Jadallah • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I had a fantastic experience at Tech Elevator. I was in Columbus Cohort[5] ’s.Net group and would (and have) recommended it to anyone looking for a career change who is remotely interested in a career in tech. It’s a major commitment of both time and money, but if you’re up to the task it’s an incredibly rewarding experience that opens doors you wouldn’t usually have access to. In my case, the return on investment was absolutely worth it as well. I spent ~$15,000 and 14 weeks on Tech Elevator and came out on the other side with a valuable skill set and a salary $30,000 higher than what I was making beforehand. ​

    If I had to sum up my experience at Tech Elevator in one word it would be “support.” 14 weeks is a long time to be bombarded with new information on a daily basis while getting ready for – and then going through – the job-search process, not to mention balancing your personal life. Perhaps unsurprisingly, pressure and stress can mount, and you can feel like you’re beginning to fray at the edges. It will be frustrating, your cohort-mates will get on your nerves at times, and it’s not easy to find people who get what you’re going through. People will discount your experience, friends and family will think you took a 3-month vacation to learn how to play with computers and that your stress is “nothing compared to the stress of a job.” I can tell you that when I went through all of this, the instructors and staff at Tech Elevator were there Every. Single. Time.

    I came in with no technical experience and when I was stuck on something instructors, in my case, primarily Andrew Frank and John Fulton, patiently sat with me until I understood what I was doing. During the job-search process, whenever I had questions or was confused or frustrated, Ben Knisley and Katie Detore were there with whatever I needed, whether it was guidance or just someone to talk to. I wrote earlier that friends and family may not understand what you’re doing or the challenges that come with the boot camp experience, but the instructors and the Tech Elevator staff absolutely do, and they couldn’t be more supportive. 

    You will learn to program at Tech Elevator, but more importantly, you will learn to be a professional programmer – a distinction I didn’t know existed until I enrolled. I always thought that if you could code, there would be companies begging to hire you. Wrong! There were several people in my cohort who were incredibly talented and knowledgeable programmers before they enrolled but couldn’t even get an interview with a recruiter – not to mention a hiring manager – because they didn’t have experience. Tech Elevator solves that problem because they have great relationships with companies who are looking for just the sort of person who is willing to leave a career and dive headfirst into programming. Better yet, Tech Elevator will bring those companies to you and GUARANTEE that you get an interview with them through the Employer Matchmaking event. ​

    If the previous 514 words weren’t enough for you to know that I was extremely satisfied with my experience, let me be very clear – I was extremely satisfied with my experience. But, I wouldn’t be a very good reviewer if all I did was gush and there were some things I wish had been done differently. The first is actually not a “complaint” of mine, but one I heard repeated a few times by cohort-mates and it’s that certain aspects of the technology stack we learned on was a bit outdated. But, do you know how many interviewers brought that up as a problem? Literally none. You learn to program and think like a programmer – that’s what matters. What interviewers were looking for was an understanding of underlying concepts and a willingness to learn. In my cohort, people ended up in positions doing languages they had no exposure to during the cohort. I know one cohort-mate is doing PHP and at least three who are doing Ruby. I myself took a Java job after completing the .Net course.

    One critique that I do have is that I think the approach to actually teaching the technical side of things should be reevaluated. The format of the instruction was that we were in the classroom from 9 am – noon-ish on most days. In general, the last 70-90 minutes were spent doing Lecture Code, which is watching an instructor talk through completed or mostly completed code. It is terrible. My instructor, John, is an incredibly engaging and passionate instructor, who made many boring topics interesting. Even he couldn’t make lecture code bearable. I can confidently say that of the 18 (I think) people in .Net with me, maybe 5 actually paid attention during lecture code. Most of us used that time to apply for jobs, search the web for the spiciest of memes, or nap with our eyes open. I have never studied pedagogy, and certainly never tried to teach anyone how to program, but there has to be a more effective way than lecture code. Personally, I would have preferred to have our assigned daily exercises (i.e. homework) be a bit longer and have the instructor walk us through a few problems as we coded along. Alternatively, I think breaking us into pairs or small groups, try to solve a problem, then whiteboard our solutions in front of the class would be an extremely valuable and effective replacement for lecture code. Not only would students be forced to actually think about the material, they would get the added benefit of forced whiteboarding and having to explain their code – something that many people struggle with come technical interview time. Additionally, they could see the different ways their classmates thought about/solved the problem.​

    Another critique I have is a lot broader and not actually as important, it’s more of a time-saving technique. I wish that I and my cohort-mates had been put on different “tracks” based on our skill level from a technical and career-prep perspective and then had events be mandatory or not, based on our track. For instance, there were some people in my class who already knew every technical topic that we covered. I’m not exaggerating when I say that they didn’t learn a single thing from being in class, not because we weren’t being instructed well, they were just already very knowledgeable. Those same people, on the other hand, benefited greatly from all the Career Pathway events. They generally were lacking some soft/professional skills and learned a lot at all the Pathway events. On the other side of the coins were people like me, who needed the classroom badly, but didn’t get a whole lot out of most of the Pathway events because we’d worked in professional environments before and could handle non-technical interviews well. I think it would be an improvement if I had been in a different, technical-skill focused “track” than my already technically proficient classmates. Class, but not all the Pathway events, should have been mandatory for me and the reverse for my classmate. Again, this isn’t a big deal, just a subtle improvement and I only bring it up because, at times, I could have really used extra time with an instructor or just time, in general, to work on a project, when I had to go and sit in on a Pathway presentation that I, personally, didn’t get much out of. 

    In conclusion, if you’re considering Tech Elevator, just do it. It was an excellent experience and more than worth the investment of time and money.

  • Craig Lawrie  User Photo
    Craig Lawrie • Systems Test Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    If you're looking into a coding bootcamp, attending one, or have already graduated, you probably know the "One Question" that I'm talking about. Maybe your friends and family asked it. If you're still in the looking phase, you're probably asking it of yourself. The question isn't "which bootcamp". The question is, "can't you just learn that online for cheaper?" I'm here to put that question to rest.

    There are plenty of resources online, including educational videos, practice problems, volunteer and paid tutors, competitions, networking, job boards, you name it. You can learn anything online. But when it comes to making a career change, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. When you can learn anything, what should you choose to learn? When are you going to start, when are you going to put your hours in, and how do you know when you’re done? How do you prove to an employer that you’ve got the right knowledge for the role they need to fill? What even are the job titles and companies that you should be looking at for this skill you want to use?

    Enter Tech Elevator. Sure, they teach you to code. Sure, they have highly qualified, talented instructors available full time to teach you, coach you, review your work, and answer your questions. But again, that’s the tip of the iceberg. Tech Elevator’s goal isn’t just to teach you how to code, it’s to get you a job in the field of software development. Whatever skills the local job market needs, those are the skills that Tech Elevator is teaching its students. You know that you’re learning the right material at the right pace, because the reputation that TE is building and looking to maintain with area employers is that their graduates are ready to fill the roles.

    And that’s not all. While you’re a student, you’ll be practicing how to communicate your skills with peers, instructors, and potential interviewers or employers. You’ll attend workshops and panels about building your own brand, including talking about yourself, building your resume, and having a good linkedin profile. You’ll learn more about the industry, such as having potential employers come in and talk about their company and openings. You’ll learn about various jobs in the industry, including roles that focus on the database or on a website aesthetic, but beyond that also to project managers, quality assurance analysts, business analysts, and more.

    Finally, there’s Matchmaking. This is where Tech Elevator proves their reputation with the local industry by cramming interviewers from local industry into every square inch of the facility. Students get interviews with small companies, large companies, and everything in between. The employers generally count these interviews as a “phone screen” or “initial interview”, getting students on their way towards employment.

    This reputation that I’ve mentioned is what it keeps coming back to. It’s a virtuous cycle. Tech Elevator needs to train students well in order to make employers happy, and they need to make employers happy in order to attract new students. And, they’re succeeding all around.

    I hope that answers the “One Question”. It’s worth going to Tech Elevator. There is no substitute for a good school that cares about the success of its students.

  • Phultron  User Photo
    Phultron • Graduate • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Person 0, John (this is programming, get used to starting at 0): John cares deeply about programming. He cares even more deeply about educating students. 30+ years of programming have transformed his mind into a technical problem-solving machine. He deftly identifies and corrects bugs in your code, all while explaining in plain English the mistake you’ve made. He is warm, and frequently states that his goal is to correct and educate students without “making them cry.”

    John will patiently work with you day and night. He is available almost every evening and virtually every weekend. Which is good because you will need to put in the hours to understand this material. John could have secured a private sector position for significantly more pay, but he loves educating and it shows.

    John will be one of the most compassionate, caring, well informed educators you’ve ever encountered.

    (the same sentiment applies to every instructor at TE)

    Person 1, Ben: Ben is a well-connected former recruiter who is responsible for employing fifty people every three months. During mock interviews and the resume refining process, his criticisms will come from a sincere desire to see you succeed. He is a corporate cupid and a tremendous advocate. He’ll take the time to learn what you enjoy and do his best to find the right recruiters and companies for you. You want this man in your corner.

    Person 2, Jane: Jane is a fictional representation of what, in my view, are the majority of students at Tech Elevator. Jane has little to no programming experience. She didn’t finish college, but she has several years of solid work experience. She’s smart, scrappy and willing to hustle.

    She starts the program with unbridled enthusiasm, bolstered by her successful completion of the prework in JS and HTML. The world is her oyster.

    About three weeks into the program she has to take up meditation at regular intervals because the ambitious course load is starting to wear on her sanity. That’s ok, the moment will pass.

    Jane will frequently feel that she is inadequate, and she will question her ability to program. It seems like everyone else is learning this so much faster than she is. They aren’t, but that’s ok, the moment will pass.

    Jane will, at one point, feel so stressed out that she’ll consider quitting TE and begging her former employer to take her back. She won’t because she’s smart. She knows the moment will pass.

    During her first technical interview she has a full-fledged nervous breakdown. Her mind is filled with every dumb thing she’s ever done, she’s convinced she can’t do this. That’s ok, the moment will pass.

    A month after graduating from the program she has had several interviews. Some were disastrous, some were near misses. She is terrified that she has made a huge investment for nothing. That’s ok, the moment will pass.

    Two months after finishing the program her patience pays off as she finds a position that is a perfect fit for her skillset. Turns out, her dream job wasn’t with company A doing job 1. Instead it was with company B doing job 6. She rejoices, and yea, the world rejoices with her.

    Person 3, Jack: there will be someone like Jack in your cohort. Jack has convinced himself that he can’t do this. He rejects the notion adopted by Salman Khan that “You can learn anything.” His ability to thrive and improve is diminished and he is unhappy with the results. In his view, everyone else is responsible for his inability to perform.

    Person 4, Alex: Alex is a fictional representation of a friendly, older-brother like figure who has a wealth of programming knowledge. He enrolled in Tech Elevator to take advantage of the corporate connections, not to learn the material. He could practically teach the course. He’s about six foot, six and has a face etched with smile lines. Be friends with Alex.  

    Person 5, Big Daddy Warbucks: Daddy Warbucks is a recruiter from that great company you’ve always wanted to work with. He or she will meet you during matchmaking, a company presentation, or an introduction from Ben.

    Big Daddy Warbucks has a checklist of characteristics (s)he is looking for. For each company that list is different. A few examples:

    Many traditional companies might have strong checks in place and they’ll only interview candidates with a bachelor’s degree. Many companies, perhaps startups, might eschew candidates who have jumped through the traditional hoops and received a degree, in favor of people who haven’t been molded by the system.

    Some companies might be in search of a programmer who is familiar with Python, but they’ll take a chance on a Java programmer with grit.

    For some companies, equal opportunity isn’t just a catch phrase, it’s part of the culture. They understand that diversity makes a company stronger. In a coin toss between the abilities of two candidates, they will pick the [insert disenfranchised minority here].   

    Some recruiters (Big Daddy Warbuckses (sp?)) will meet you and think “Wow! This candidate is incredible! I am so glad I came to this matchmaking event. If only I had a position for them.” six months later, a new position opens up. Big Daddy Warbucks picks up his/her gold-plated telephone, takes a big puff of his/her cigar and calls you from his/her perch on Mount Olympus. Congratulations! You are to be exalted!

    In summary:

    If you’re like me, you’ll waffle between being a Jane and a Jack. Do your best to be a Jane.

    Tech Elevator is an outstanding institution. You will develop powerful cross-linguistic technical problem-solving abilities during your time here.

    Can you start at Tech Elevator without having written a single line of code and go on to secure your dream job as a programmer? Absolutely.

    Are you a more compelling candidate if you have extensive previous programming experience? a degree? worked in a programming adjacent field? Experience leading teams? Demonstrate strong interpersonal skills? Very physically attractive? Under 50?

    Yeah, probably. Some people are better qualified than you, others are less qualified. Get over yourself.

     

    Should you place your hopes and dreams on a single company, position, or sector?

    No. Not only is that not realistic, it’s also unfair to you, the job seeker. Besides, you might find during the education and recruitment process that there is a job you’d never considered that’s more interesting. Or, like me, you might find that your dream job is a position where programming is a component of your job, rather than the sole focus of your job.

    Can you learn this material on your own and forgo the bootcamp route? Maybe.

    If you have the self-discipline, tenacity, and sheer intelligence to learn everything Tech Elevator teaches in three months BY YOURSELF, you shouldn’t be looking for a job. You should be starting your own company. So… Good luck!

     

    Is the course worth $15.5k? Yes*

     

    *this may not be the case if you don’t apply yourself, if you don’t show up, if you don’t put in the leg work to find a job, if you have a bad attitude, if you don’t network like a player. In short, if you kick against the pricks.

     

    Advice to management:

    You’re doing a great job teaching students and employing people. Far be it for me, a lowly graduate to advise you on your business practice and pricing. Just… Keep the main thing the main thing.

    Suggestions on alternative revenue streams that will allow tuition to keep pace with inflation:

    Programming for high school students.

    Corporate sponsored cohorts (I believe this idea was being thrown around already.)

    Corporate matchmaking for vetted mid-career professionals (Networkers gonna Network.)

    A cheaper, self-paced, online version of the course (should be easy to whip up, right?)

    Your smart folks, you’ll figure it out.

  • Student
    - 8/24/2018
    Elihu Reynolds  User Photo
    Elihu Reynolds • Product Support Specialist • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Tech Elevator was a great experience.  I do wish that I had more of a tech background.  However, the most important thing that Tech Elevator taught me is how to teach myself going forward, and that is incredibly valuable.  I met some incredible people, and I learned a lot of full stack development.  Overall, a great experience. 

Tech Elevator Outcomes


96%
On-Time Graduation Rate
94%
In-Field Employed
$55,000
Median Salary

88% of students intended to seek in-field employment within 180 days of graduating. 11% of students did not intend to seek in-field employment.Below is the 180 Day Employment Breakdown for 47 graduates included in report:

180 Day Employment Breakdown:

Full-time employee
61.7%
Full-time apprenticeship, internship or contract position
31.9%
Short-term contract, part-time, or freelance
0.0%
Started a new company or venture after graduation
0.0%

Employed out-of-field
0.0%
Continuing to higher education
%
Not seeking a job for health, family, or personal reasons
%

Still seeking job in-field
6.4%

Could not contact
0.0%

Salary Breakdown:

100% of job obtainers reported salaries. 2% of job obtainers were hired by the school itself.

Notes & Caveats:

Read the full Tech Elevator CIRR Report here

Thanks!