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Dev Bootcamp

Austin, Chicago, New York City, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle

Dev Bootcamp

Avg Rating:4.32 ( 151 reviews )

As of July 17, 2017, Dev Bootcamp is no longer accepting applications. Founded in 2012, Dev Bootcamp is a short-term, immersive 18-week software development program (9 weeks part-time remote, 9 weeks onsite immersive, with career prep integrated throughout). Dev Bootcamp’s mission is to transform lives by teaching people of all backgrounds the technical, cognitive, and interpersonal skills used in software development through a responsive instructional model.

Graduates of the program are agile in Ruby, Rails, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and database systems such as SQL and PostgreSQL. Students also learn how to approach challenges like developers, how to optimize their learning, and then apply those techniques to pick up new skills or languages required in the field. The Dev Bootcamp curriculum is informed by employers and students with the aim of preparing graduates for the current job market.

Graduates work for a range of companies from startups, to mid-size and Fortune 500 companies in industries including tech, fashion, finance, education, travel, and media. Dev Bootcamp currently has six campuses operating in San Francisco, Chicago, New York, San Diego, Seattle, and Austin.

Recent Dev Bootcamp Reviews: Rating 4.32

all (151) reviews for Dev Bootcamp →

Recent Dev Bootcamp News

Read all (67) articles about Dev Bootcamp →
  • Web Development

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, SQL, Rails, CSS, Ruby
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week
    Start Date
    None scheduled
    Cost
    $12,700
    Class size
    N/A
    Location
    New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, San Diego, Seattle, Austin
    The Dev Bootcamp Web Development course is split into four phases. Phase 0 is a 9 week intensive, structured remote program that includes weekly challenges, guided pairing sessions, and feedback from instructors. It requires about 25 hours a week to complete. The full time, immersive, on-site portion is divided into three, three-week phases: Phase 1, Phase 2, and Phase 3. Core program hours are daily from 9 to 6, with evening and weekend assignments, challenges, and enrichment activities.
    Financing
    Deposit
    $1000
    Financing
    Lending partners available, including Skills Fund, Affirm, Pave, and Upstart.
    Scholarship
    We always offer $1,500 scholarships to the following groups: Veterans, anyone who identifies as a woman or is part of the diverse gender community, and anyone who identifies as an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill Level
    N/A
    Prep Work
    9 week mandatory Phase 0 component that will require 25 hours per week
    Placement Test
    No
    Interview
    Yes

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  • Larry Cherry  User Photo
    Larry Cherry • Service Remote Technician • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    I enjoyed my time at DBC and they took me from not knowing any coding to building Ruby on Rails sites. DBC is no longer open by the time I am writing this review but there was a few core things that the recent grads would have benefited from in an updated curriculum. First a stronger focus on Node would have been very useful especially with demand for Junior Rails developers being down. Employers now demand much more in terms of experience and personal projects so a guide for post-graduation career development would have been a huge help. Many of the companies on DBC's Employ site were not looking for Junior Developers especially Jr Ruby Developers. I find myself in a weird situation where I am much more technically inclined but not skilled enough to compete for the scarce number of Junior Developer positions on the market. I took a position in a support role that utilizes my skills to some extent but there is no clear path to becoming an actual software developer especially where I am at skill wise. Anyone planning on taking a Coding Bootcamp in the future should really look at the job market and figure out what skills are in demand before attending a coding school. If recent grads of the coding school you are interested in, do not have jobs after 3+ months of looking then maybe that coding school is not worth your money. Job placement is super important and DBC was having a lot of difficulties placing recent grads over the past year. To summarize, I did enjoy my time at DBC but I did not graduate with the skills I needed to get into a Junior Developer Role. 

  • Joe Moorhouse  User Photo
    Joe Moorhouse • Junior Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    DBC was a fantstic lifechanging experience. However, I will say, the tech stack is a bit dated. Ruby is on the decline, and if I was to do things over again, and my only consideration was time from program start to securing a job, I was have chosen a Javascript focused bootcamp.

    I am going to refrain from rambling on, as there are endless reviews here that will tell you what a transformative experience DBC is, and I echo their sentiments entirely. At the risk of sounding redundant though, Ruby is just not the in-demand language that it used to be. Keep coding after graduation and you'll learn this skills necessary to get a dev job (I'm currently using Java for my job) however, if you expect to get a job immediately, or even that quickly after graduation, I'd recommend you temper you expectations. 

  • Linsey R  User Photo
    Linsey R • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    If you're looking to just learn code and learn it fast. Think again. But if you're looking to learn code in an environment that fosters collaboration and focuses more on a hollistic approach to web development, then you're on the right track. Dev Bootcamp Seattle is exactly that. The campus is conveniently located right in Pioneer Sqare in the Capitol One Investment building of lovely Seattle. It's a quaint open layout space with the best staff you will ever meet. These people genuinly care about you, your wellbeing, your learning, your everything. You are their main priority forever and always. From BEFORE you even start your first day, they're interested in getting to know you. Once you're there you gain a new family! The people are amazing and the structure of the classes are amazing. You have 24/7 access to the space and access to a curiculum that is ever changing. DBC prides itself on feedback and has been able to build a system where they can integrate your feedback on a consistent basis. If you're looking for a program that has a good structure to teach students how to code but also teach them how to be great people int he world and then DBC is the place for you. The type of group environment that DBC Seattle foster produces an amazing experience that you can't get anywhere else. They're building a great community out in Seattle. Alumni even care about you! It's an inclusive space where people come together to talk tech, talk food, and just want to get to know you. You'll never feel like you're alone or the only one stuck on a problem at any given point. It's a team effort everyday to make sure you're getting the best education possible. DBC Seattle really curates to their students wishes. If you want to attend a program that teaches you how to code, helps you meeting amazing people and cares about you, then DBC is the place to be. 

  • Edward Eng  User Photo
    Edward Eng • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Overall...I think the program was pretty good, especially for people who don't have a background in computer science. I graduated from the Chicago campus and the program used Ruby and Javascript as the tools to teach us 'how to learn how to code'.

    I'm in Houston now and about to start work on April 17, 2017. There isn't as much Ruby in the city. But JavaScript is still very popular just like many other places around the world.

    The one thing I guess I would've like to see DBC push more were things like React, Angular, and Node. But I guess that really depends on what you like and want to do after you graduate.

    That said, one suggestion I have is to do research on front-end vs. back-end vs. full-stack. And also look at the jobs in the city or cities you want to work in after you graduate. See what kind of positions are available and what the tech stacks look like before you decide on a bootcamp.

    Feel free to connect with me at http://www.mistereng.com.

  • Not Disappointed
    - 2/27/2017
    Tim Deel  User Photo
    Tim Deel • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Before pursuing this career change, I did extensive research into coding bootcamps available. Afterwards, I had decided that Dev Bootcamp was right for me. So much so that even though as a Denver resident it would have been much easier for me to go to somewhere local (such as Galvanize), I left CO for Seattle so that I could attend. Dev Bootcamp offers an incredibly holistic approach to how they teach. First and foremost, they really help alleviate the pressure and stress of taking on such a large task by easing you into the process with the Phase 0 remote phase. On top of that, they make the decision to join Dev Bootcamp easier by offering tuition reimbursement if the program turns out to not be for you. 

    With all of that in mind, I went into the program with lofty expectations. I was in no way disappointed. Speaking more to Dev Bootcamp's holistic approach, they also have you undergo career courses to help strengthen your online presence thru applications such as LinkedIn. These career courses also help with resume prep, do's and don'ts, as well as networking skills that have been tremendously helpful. Finally, they also offer Engineering Empathy Courses which honestly, teach you to be a better person. Now that is centered around the framework of being a coder, such as how to work well with a pair or team, but the lessons you learn from this are instrumental to having a better connection with those around you. 

    Speaking directly to the core curriculum, I found the work to be engaging, fun, and ultimately, challenging. There is always assignments to be done, and very rarely will you find yourself completing all of that day's assignments before the end of core hours.  This can seem daunting at first, but it was a great way to make sure that I was always challenged. The coursework itself would range in what you were coding or making, but with each assignment came both a way to lock down previously learned skills while learning something new at the same time.

    Moving on to the most important part of the review, the staff. Wow. This is where I was truly flabbergasted. Never in my life (sorry previous teachers) have I met people more dedicated to the well being and education of their students. The instructors I had were Jordan and Stu. These two worked incredibly well with each other, playing off each others' strengths and weakness to provide an incredible teaching experience. Both of these instructors came in on holiday's to help offer students more 1 on 1 time. Jerod, the director, did an absolute hands on job with the program as well. Constantly seeking student feedback, doing 1 on 1 check-ins, being active and engaging with students, you name it. You will never find people that have your back in an education setting as much as these 3 will. 

    Finally, we have the campus, known as "The Space". The Space has a very comfortable and relaxed feel to it. The entrance is inviting, and give you as small sneak peek of what's in store for you. Once you walk in, you'll immediately see the first lounge area. This includes a wall mounted flat screen (with open HDMI access which is great for working/presenting with a group), a comfy couch, and these ridiculously comfortable rocking/lounge chairs. Surrounding you from there are a sea of Mac computer pairing stations, and a few standing desk pair station. You'll then some some strange looking phone booths so you can take a phone call without disturbing, or being disturbed for that matter by others around you. Moving further into the campus you'll see the "dining hall", a long table where you and your cohort will enjoy your meals with some comradery. A great place to unwind, and talk about how the classwork is going so far. There's also a table with board and card games; a great way to relieve stress and have some extra bonding time with your cohort. The kitchen area is quaint with a full refrigerator/freezer, microwave, coffee pot, electric water kettle, and toaster oven. If you go past the second lounge area, you'll enter the lecture area. This is where the morning and afternoon breakouts happen (classes that are determined by the needs of the students). This area is perfect for learning with a standard tables and chairs, as well as beanbags and a couch for the more comfy learning experience. 

    All in all, Dev Bootcamp has been a life changing experience for me. Not only do I have the skills and know how to make it as a developer, but I'm also just simply a better person from the approach that Dev Bootcamp took in teaching.

  • Dev Bootcamp
    - 2/6/2017
    Richard  User Photo
    Richard • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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    I attended Dev Bootcamp 2 years ago and it changed my life (no, really!).

    I went from knowing absolutely nothing to making a living doing something I could only dream of doing. Plus, I had the bonus of making some life long friends and professional connections.

    You'll learn Ruby, JavaScript, SQL, HTML, CSS. You'll learn some basic computer science,  heroku, git and how to structure relational data.

    My only criticism is that I wish they were a little more JavaScript heavy. This might have changed since my 2 years there.  This didn't stop me from enrolling my fiancé.

  • Gabriel Firmacion  User Photo
    Gabriel Firmacion • Developer Integration Specialist • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
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    Going to Dev Bootcamp literally changed my career path. I had no coding experience before and when I move to San Francisco, I realized important it is to learn how to code given that the tech industry is very big here. I wanted to learn fast and Dev Bootcamp did not require a prior experience.

    It's a 19 week program where the first 9 weeks are remote which was a good thing so that I can still continue my full time job while studying. I really liked this because what if I didn't coding after all? At least I still had my old job right? 

    The next 9 weeks was onsite where I dabbled more on Ruby and a little of JS. This experience was very fun, I loved the environment that DBC provided and also the fact that they gave a lot of importance on your soft skills through their Engineering Empathy program. This focuses on how to act socially and how to be more empathetic in a work environment which improves your communication and interpersonal skills. In other words, they train you to become a better human being.

    The last week was career week. This was very fast and I felt this is what DBC should improve on. They touch negotiotation skills, how to land interviews, and how to perform on technical interviews. 1 week is not enough for this, especially on the technical interview training.

    After graduation, I felt I learned a LOT. It would have been impossible for me to absorb that amount of knowledge if I were studying alone. However, I still felt I wasn't job ready and I wasn't. I struggled to get a job. It took me 8 months before I got employed for a full time position. What went wrong? Besides my job hunting strategy, I felt that the curriculum wasn't up to par with the job openings that were available. There wasn't a lot of Ruby job openings. I hope that DBC could have focused more on JS and would have taught React or Angular. Then again, looking back at the 9 months I spent there, I don't have any idea how they could still fit that into their curriculum given that I really felt I was learning a lot.

    I am very thankful for the experience. It wasn't perfect but without it, I wouldn't have entered the tech industry as a developer integration specialist (something like a junior engineer).

  • DBC Alumnus
    - 11/17/2017
    Brian Lin • Full Stack Developer • Graduate
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    Dev Bootcamp provided me with the learning environment and support to become a web developer, as well as gave me a network of close friends whom I can rely upon. Attending DBC was one of the best choices I've ever made.

  • Rich • Jr. Engineer • Graduate
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    The program was excellent and really taught you how to learn new skills/frameworks/technologies quickly. I graduated from the Chicago campus and the program used Ruby and Javascript as the main tools for learning the fundamentals of writing code.

    Still in Chicago with a great new gig using Javascript, React, and Node most of which I taught myself following the program using the style of learning I learned there; however, several of my cohort mates got jobs where they are working in the exact languages we learned.

    As I was leaving alot was changing; however, for what its worth it was an amazing experience. I agree with what others here have posted about researching the city where you are looking to work and finding out what languages are being used there. Not that you get locked in to a single language/waste time by learning non-applicable skills but it will make you more appealing to employers to have a portfolio in location-industry specific skills and cut down on the jobsearch time.

    Great career staff, great mentorship, very intense (military bootcamp time/energy investment) with a lot of kindness and support

    Feel free to connect with me at https://rrichardsonv.github.io

  • Dan McKeon • Graduate
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    I had a truly life-changing experience at Dev Bootcamp (DBC) Seattle. I've had an interest in programming for years and have spent a lot of time and energy self-teaching through online resources and seeking mentorship through Meetup groups, but I was never quite able to get over the hump. I never felt like I really understood the concepts, instead I was just nailing down the operations and syntax.

    Enter Dev Bootcamp Seattle.

    I learned far more in 18 weeks at DBC than I had over the previous five years of self-teaching. They're the oldest coding bootcamp in existence and it shows. The coursework is on point. You really learn the basic concepts in-depth before you use the fancy new technologies. We got to learn React! It's a very, very popular and marketable JavaScript framework right now. I see it all over the place on job descriptions and had planned to learn it for some time. DBC delivered.

    The first 9 weeks is all online. I kept working a regular job and devoted about 20 hours a week to DBC. The coursework was really well put together and you get to start pair programming right away. I was a little resistant to pairing at first, but I now believe there is no better learning tool than pair programming. You'll cover the basics of the command line, Git/Github, Ruby, and Javascript during this phase. Then comes the real deal. 

    The pace at which we covered material during the in-person portion (the second 9 weeks) was astonishing. And the most incredible thing is how knowledge much we could actually retain covering material at this pace. The coursework is to credit for part of that, but arguably an even bigger part is the awesome instructors at Dev Bootcamp Seattle. Jordan has a knack for breaking down very complex material into concepts we could all understand. Anil is great at diving in-depth into just about anything in the realm of computer science. They have both been programming for years and are very knowledgeable.

    I have talked to people at other bootcamps and to me, quality of instructors may be the BIGGEST DIFFERENTIATOR that Dev Bootcamp offers. Some other bootcamps have instructors that recently graduated the program. I definitely recommend you make this one of the most important criteria in choosing a bootcamp. Realize that all of the technical course material that any bootcamp offers can be found online, maybe not organized as well, but it's all there. Quality mentors are rare. Being able to ask a question and have it explained succinctly by someone that really knows what they're talking about could save you days or weeks of Googling. No joke.

    Another big differentiator at Dev Bootcamp is the Engineering Empathy (EE) curriculum. EE teaches "soft skills" like communication and empathy. The session was once-weekly and we covered topics ranging from introversion/extroversion to microaggressions to teamwork. I thought this was a cool concept but did not expect it to be nearly as impactful as it was. I improved my communication skills a great deal during the course of the bootcamp. My wife and other people around me have noticed. This will not only help me at work (employers really value this stuff!) but also in life. It's an outcome I didn't expect, but I am supremely grateful for. In hindsight, engineering empathy is right up there with the technical skills for the most important things I learned at DBC. 

    There are other programs out there that offer an internship at the end, which is something that on its face seems very appealing. But realize these internships are not always extended and if they aren't paid, then you're kind of in the same position you would have been without the internship. The question is, would you rather have spent that extra 2 months at the end of the coursework building someone else's app or developing applications that are actually meaningful to you and including them in your portfolio?

    After you graduate, DBC sticks with you. Lacey, the careers coordinator, emails us frequently with job opportunities and we also have regular 1 on 1 meetings to discuss the status of our search. You are also provided a lot of resources for making sure your resume and Linkedin are in top notch shape and preparing for technical interviews. Plus you're still able to use the space while working on apps for your portfolio after you graduate.

    It is very clear to me Dev Bootcamp is invested in our success and that's what makes me want to spend time writing a review for them. Best of luck with your bootcamp search. At least go meet with Jared at Dev Bootcamp Seattle, you will not regret it.

  • Jeff K • Web Developer • Graduate
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    Why I chose Dev Bootcamp:

    Alumni Network: Dev Bootcamp was the first coding bootcamp ever (founded in 2012) and started the whole idea of a web development immersive program. It now has 6 campuses and has one of the largest alumni networks out of any code school.

    Tuition: Around 13k (depending on the campus), Dev Bootcamp’s cost is definitely on the lower end of the spectrum. Many schools are now closer to 20k. Also, if necessary, you can repeat the program...for free. As far as I know, no other code school offers anything similar to this.

    Curriculum: In my opinion (and I think most people coming from traditional computer science backgrounds would agree with me on this) it’s just not realistic for someone new to coding to adequately learn multiple stacks in just a few months. This helped me narrow down some options and cross-out schools where they promise to teach you 3+ stacks in just 12-14 weeks. I liked Dev Bootcamp’s approach: In 18 weeks you get a solid foundation of Ruby on Rails on the backend and now React on the front including all the fundamentals to make that happen. Laser focused. And the curriculum is designed to act as a starting point for you continue to learn and jump into new technologies on your own.

    Duration: I wanted more than 12-14 weeks of training before hitting the job search. Dev Bootcamp’s schedule is longer than most, clocking in at 18 weeks.

    My experience there:

    I have to be honest here; though I was confident I picked a bootcamp that was right for me, I was still cautiously optimistic about the whole process. But now having gone through the program, I couldn’t have been happier with my decision.

    In addition to the full stack development side of the curriculum, Dev Bootcamp also emphasizes best practices for team workflow. DBC does this through a combination of technical and non-technical training (with the latter focusing on pair programming, giving and receiving constructive feedback, and learning general skills on how to effectively work with others in a technical environment). I wasn’t sure what to make of the non-technical focus (dubbed Engineering Empathy) but having gone through the program and now better understanding the actual practices within the industry, I can tell you that this training on interpersonal communication is legit. Not only will it help you find a job but you will hit the ground running when jumping onto a development team.

    As someone who has had a fair amount of schooling (3 years of graduate school) I can say that the staff at DBC Seattle genuinely care about the students and are some of the best teachers and mentors I have ever met. Most importantly though, they practice what they preach. The staff will take your feedback seriously as they are constantly pushing themselves to improve on the overall experience. And I’d like to point out that despite Kaplan’s acquisition of DBC a few years ago, DBC has maintained its bottom-up, grassroots mentality by keeping its focus on students and staying active in the tech community through hosting / sponsoring events.

    For those of you thinking about taking the plunge into tech, just know that there isn’t a code school that will magically get you a job. You get what you put into it. From what I can tell, (and this is agnostic to any specific coding school), the students that are the most driven and put in the most time are the one’s that find good jobs. That being said, do your research and find a school that fits your needs. Dev Bootcamp was that school for me and it was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. Feel free to connect if you have any questions - linkedin.com/in/jkranking/

  • Ibraheem Abdul-Malik • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    Overall, Dev Bootcamp was a great experience for me as I was able to start a great job doing Engineering within 2 months of graduating after having no prior professional coding experience.

    The instructors were great and the careers team was really excellent.  Most of all, the times that were shared amongst the students is a lifelong treasure.

    I do think that the school needs to continue to modernize and improve the curriculum in order to make more students more employable.

  • Zara • Apprentice Engineer • Graduate
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    If I was asked, "Given your experience, if you had the choice of going back and doing Dev Bootcamp, would you?" I would say, "hell yeah!" 

    I'm not going to lie, the curriculum needs some upgrading. And yeah, I could probably learn everything I learned through online tutorials if provided the resources. However, my DBC experience was all about the people. It was about struggling and learning in unity. I got to bond with my cohort, those who came before me, and those after me. I built connections with the teachers and mentors. I got to network with other folks who were just onsite.

    Asides from the community and network, I also gained the structure and discipline. I ended up pushing myself to study code for nearly 70 hours a week. If I was teaching myself, I probably wouldn't have learned at such a fast pace. 

    Through my experience, I didn't feel as prepared going into the workforce. I mean, being in the Bay Area, we're competing against CS undergrads from Berkeley and Stanford ALONG with a ton of other bootcamp grads. Sure, there's jobs but there's also a lot of people seeking. It's crazy. However, I do think DBC knows this and is making some changes in the way they prep you for technical interviews. But just be prepared to spend a couple of months after DBC grinding and studying on your own before landing your first gig. 

    The SF Careers team is fantastic! They're really invested in all of the boots and although they don't hand out jobs, they sure provide you the tools and support to land your dream job. 

    All in all, I enjoyed my experience with DBC. But keep in mind, you get out of it what you put into it. So if you're willing to seek out additional knowledge during AND after the duration of the bootcamp and dedicate your life to code, then you have chosen the right place. 

  • Justin G. • Front End Software Engineer • Graduate
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    I spent months getting ready to make the leap into web development.  I debated the worth of bootcamps and the subtle differences between the 6 or so largest in Seattle.  I saved money and decided to come to DBC Seattle.  It was an expensive and scary move, but I can assure you it was likely one of the best decisions I will have ever made in my life.

    My biggest concern in jumping into a bootcamp was not being marketable in the job search.  First off, the tides are turning, and bootcamp grads are given more shots in the interview process to prove their worth.  Couple that with a true understanding of the web, object-oriented design, and best practices with commonly used technologies (all of which is taught at DBC), and you have yourself interested recruiters, then interviews, and then... a job in a new industry.

    DBC is 5 months and is broken into 2.5 months remote and 2.5 months on campus.  The remote work (Phase 0) is not as demanding, however take advantage of ALL the resources.  That might only be 20 hours of work a week, but delve deeper than that [unless you have a part-time job].  The deeper you explore in this phase, the more success you'll have on-campus, where the slightest faulter could really impact what you can accomplish.  I did wish there were more stretch challenges and resources during this phase, but the onn-campus made up for that.  Also I was doing Free Code Camp on the side which was good Front-End practice.

    Then you arrive on campus, which will be tough.  You may be a confident programmer or fast learner, but at DBC there will always be challenges.  Whether they come as interpersonal challenges or stretch challenges, this camp will provide you the means to push yourself and the instructors to make journeying into deeper concepts and technologies achievable. 

    For job assistance, there is a career developer which serves to get you on top of the necessities: a solid resume, impressive LinkedIn, and tools for networking.  On top of intermittent career breakouts, there's an entire week of exclusive career services at the end of the program.  Beyond that the team [speaking for Seattle] is extremely supportive and willing to help out even as other cohorts come rolling in.  

    I should also mention the Engineering Empathy, which was valuable in really preparing for working in the industry.  There is really a focus on fostering an environment that is inclusive and comfortable for everyone.  Not just for promoting diversity, but also for establishing helathy and effective team dynamics.  As someone who was a bit skeptical of how relevant this was to getting a job, I can see it's VERY important!  It makes you be a better team player, provide good feedback, and really care for your work and the environment that you are a part of.

    DBC has definitely changed my life.  I feel prepared to take my new career as a Software Engineer less than 2 months out of the program, and I owe so much of that to the people at DBC who really value their role in making web developers out of all those who take the leap.

    TLDR - DBC changed my life and equipped me with the tools to get a job and feel confident in making beautiful and meaningful things!  If you're anything like me in the coding bootcamp search a year ago, take this as a vote of confidence for DBC!

  • Waleeta • Graduate
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    Even for the smartest people, Dev Bootcamp is hard. It will push you to your learning limits. But if you really love coding, want to learn more, and are willing to really work hard, then I think Dev Bootcamp is a great choice. What they really teach you is how to teach yourself. Instructors will help you get unstuck, explain things to you, but you have to be willing to try to solve things on your own first. They do this because this will be your career. You will forever be learning new things and you have to know how to teach yourself. This isn't like a traditional classroom, so expect to do a lot on your own, with help.

    You will be on campus seven days a week, for 10+ hours/day (although less on Sundays). Even if you're used to being the smartest person in the room, get ready to be challenged. Throughout it, though, I still loved what I was doing, even when it was frustrating or extremely difficult. If you start to hate it, or don't think you're really that into coding, it might not be for you.

    I graduated in January 2017, and met my goal of having a job before the end of March. The careers team is very helpful with reviewing your resume, your cover letters, your LinkedIn, but if you have more work experience you'll already have a good basis for how to find a job you like. 

    I can understand why they have set up their curriculum the way they have; they are teaching you to think like an engineer. The only thing I wish they taught a little more is front-end frameworks like ReactJS. So for your final project....use ReactJS (or another front-end Javascript framework). It will help with your job search. DBC teaches you Javascript so pay attention to it!

    Dev Bootcamp helped me change my life and despite all the tears, frustration, and sleepless nights, I am happy I did it, and I still love to code.

  • James • Unemployed • Graduate
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    To start, I should state that I attended DBC a little less than three years ago, before the Kaplan merger and right around the time the bootcamp insustry was starting to explode. Now, three years later, and with little to show for it, I can confidently state that attending Dev Bootcamp was an enormous mistake.

    I started coding about four years ago because I was looking for a new hobby and this seemed like a good way to use my mind after a long day of less than satisifying work. And I loved it from the start, it was challenging but not frustrating, and even when it got very difficult the thrill of creating something and making the computer dance more than compensated. Over time I came to see that programming was something I both enjoyed and had some aptitude for. I started to think that I could do it as more than a hobby.

    It was about that time that first heard about DBC. It sounded amazing, a place where I could fill in the gaps, learn how programming really works and get a foothold in the industry. I knew I could get in, that was never in doubt. After a few weeks of considering I applied, was accepted and off I went.

    Dev Bootcamp nearly destroyed my love of writing code.  I put in a ton of hours, usually around thirteen on the weekdays, eight to ten on the weekends and I was only not in the building 2 days out of my twelve weeks.  The instructors however were only there from eight to five, monday through friday and were often unavailable during those times.  So if you were struggling with something, or a learning tool didn't work, you were out of luck if it was outside those hours.  Even when there was an instructor there the quality of what they could teach was often very lacking. I didn't learn anywhere near what I expected to, in spite of putting in the time. My final project was a joke, something that I'm absolutely ashamed of. It was like the physical manifestation of three months of futility and failure.  Still, I left hoping that I would know enough to get that critical first job, and everything would be all right.

    That didn't happen. I applied to a ton of places, and the few that even bothered to respond came back with canned rejection letters. I kept being told that I had to network and go to events, but not living in a major tech hub there wasn't much I could do there. Otherwise, I didn't get much assistance from DBC and really felt like I was on my own. No great connections to companies, no inside track to get me interviews.  I have managed to take a few positions since then but none of them have been as a developer or offered any useful professional experience or growth.

    So I'm farther behind than when I started, no job, no prospects. I haven't even had an interview anywhere I didn't get a referral, and even some places where I know people I've still had no luck. Everything I've tried to demonstrate value has been a dead end. Prior to going to DBC I had a job which, while being very unsatisfying, gave me a good wage, insurance, union coverage and a growing bank account. Now I have none of that, minus the sixteen thousand I spent on tuition, and living expenses. Not to mention the mental toll of abandoning my family for three months when they really needed me, and the changeable physical impact I can feel on my well being.

    As I said, this was some time ago.  I've spoken to a number of more recent grads and from what I've seen the situation is getting worse for DBC graduates  Another red flag is that the company is refusing to participate in an independent assessment of their outcomes.  Bootcamps are pumping out thousands of graduates every year, and the market simply can't absorb them all.  I would be leary of any bootcamp, but DBC in particular as they seem to be coasting on reputation.  Any company that won't release hard numbers is one to avoid.

    People say that DBC changes lives. Well, it changed mine, but not the way I expected it to. I still remember first checking out the Dev Bootcamp website four years ago. "In Nine Weeks" the website said, "You Will Be A Web Developer." Well, I put in more than nine weeks, and I'm sure as hell not a web developer. Some days I don't think I even want to be.

  • Omar • Graduate
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    If you want to deeply understand how Web development works, you've come to the right place. The program teaches you the fundementals of the whole process -- from the purely theoretical aspects of object-oriented programming, to the actual skill of how to write an HTTP request from scratch (line by line, really). I think "learning how to learn" is DBC's greatest strength, but this realization comes only once you are in the thick of it and have already put in some time and effort. 

    The instructors are great -- always willing to answer questions, and even if you are in a time-crunch they will make themselves available to you. Their knowledge and experienced perspectives really shine through when you engage.I might not suggest this course for someone whose stated goal is to become a "highly-paid engineer" as quickly as possible. But who knows, with team emphathy as part of the curriculum, you may find yourself surprised by what you get out of it...

     

  • Jay P • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    My experience at DBC Austin was incredible and totally got me ready for my career change into programming.  I live in New Hampshire and decided to travel out to Austin for the onsite portion of the program.  After I graduated, I returned back home and was able to find a great job in NH.  It is totally possible to find a job in other cities and other parts of the country.  I could not have done it without the amazing support from the DBC staff, instructors, and my classmates.  Even while not being local to Austin, DBC regularly checked in with me to see how my job hunt was going and to see if there was any assistance they could offer.  I am forever greatful to DBC!

    The program is intensive.  You will be pushed.  You will be tested.  But this is what you SHOULD want.  You will be so much better for it.  Making a career change is not easy.  DBC knows this and they get you prepared for whats to come when you graduate.  They will teach you how to learn things quickly and effectively and be confident with new challenges (employers love this).  You will have multiple projects to show off.  Your resume and LinkedIn will be sharp and professional.  You will do mock interviews to get you ready for the real thing.  You will also have access to an extensive alumni channel.   

    DBC wants to see you succeed.  They get excited to see the timid newbie transform into a confident programmer.  They want to make sure you have all the tools and resources you need to reach your goals while in the program and while job hunting.  If you are serious about a career in programming and are looking into bootcamps - you will be doing yourself a GREAT service by reaching out to DBC.  You will be impressed!

  • Adam Vera • Student
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    I personally loved my experience at DBC but that may have been because I expected it to require a LOT of effort during as well as after. 

    Assuming you understand and are excited by this prospect then this is the camp for you!

    Instructors are really amazing as well as the support system they provide for your ongoing growth after the program. 

  • Josh Suich • Software Developer • Graduate
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    I was making $30k a year doing something that was boring and unfruitful. I taught myself enough Ruby on codeacademy.com (not relationship to the Code Academy bootcamp) to know that I liked programming, and narrowed the field of training programs to Dev Bootcamp and Code Academy.

    The instructors, culture, curriculum, and fellow students were all fantastic. I can't overstate what a positive environment it was, and how effectively all of these factors instilled in me a functional skillset to begin a real career as a web developer. The interactive training portal and classroom flow work very well together, and the collective learning environment offers so much that you can't get alone in front of a computer, no matter how good the site or application or e-book is that you're learning from.

    I found a job 11 days after graduating, and started making over $70k/year in the Denver/Boulder area doing .NET development!

    There's no such thing as a magic bullet in almost any part of life... but when it comes to career, if you get an education like this, in the software/ web field, and you don't have a job... its because you haven't tried. Period.

    I really can't stress how categorically good-natured, competent, and fun the staff and teachers of Dev Bootcamp are. I know it can be daunting to shell out 12k for a certification, but neither I nor anyone in my graduating class (that I know of) regretted the investment in ourselves and our careers.

  • Emily • Graduate
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    I am a recent graduate (as in 2 weeks ago) from DBC, Chicago. I can honestly say it was the most rewarding, stressful and life changing experience. It's only been 2 weeks so I can't properly speak on the job climate but so far one interview has already resulted in an offer, which is promising.

    Going from a minimal background in Ruby to learning JavaScript, SQL & PostgreSQL, HTML, CSS and most importantly Rails. They set you up from the beginning to get into good Git workflow, deploy to Heroku and work in Agile teams. The main take away for me personally was they taught me how to teach myself, as the world of programming can't possibly be covered in 9 weeks.

    I will emphasize that the course is a lot to take on, and you have to really bring yourself and commit to want to learn. My one criticism is the curriculum could probably be better about front-end JavaScript, maybe incorporate ReactJS a little? Either way it's a great foundation to leave and continue to build on. Will definitely recommend DBC to anyone looking to get into the world of software development. 

  • Jasmine Feldmann • Associate Software Engineer • Graduate
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    If you're willing to put the time and energy into learning, Dev Bootcamp is a great way to learn the basics of web development. They really focus on teaching you how to learn indepently, with help when you need it. The first nine weeks help you get a feel for the basics of Ruby and setting up your development space, which help you easily transition into the more intensive nine weeks on site. It also helps you decide if this is something for you before you actually quit your job and go all in. The structure of the nine weeks on site is helpful, as you build up your Ruby skills before learning the basics of Rails and then dive right in to your final project. After you finish, the career coaches help you hone your message as to why a company should hire you and perfect the cold outreach that will help get you a job. The one thing they could work on is getting more reliable companies on their employer platform, as there most of them never got back to me or were looking for devs with more experience. Saying that, I did get an apprentice developer job seven weeks after graduating thanks to the other career services they offer!

  • Diana Marquez • Software Engineer • Graduate
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    I am a huge proponent of people attending DevBootcamp since graduating from the program, I've encouraged many acquaintances to apply for the program. 

    Pros: 
    - You learn so much, so quickly - The program is broken down into trimester-like sections. Each "trimester" you learn a new language and different programming components. At the end of each "trimester", you build a project with a team. 
    - You get real experience of what being developer is - On a day-to-day basis, what I did my first year of working as a software engineer wasn't much different than what I did at bootcamp. You get your requirements, you learn to use resources to improve your knowledge-base and create better code, you pair program, you debug, etc. The DevBootcamp experience really prepares you to jump into a job on a development team. 
    - Great network of people - The bootcamp has been great at getting quality people into their program. The alumni are diverse - in terms of age, experience, previous careers, race, gender, economic background, etc, which leaves you with a network of diverse group of people in tech. Incredibly valuable.
    - Career Placement - There is a group of staff dedicated to helping alumni find jobs. In fact, it's part of the curriculum. The week after we graduated, we still came to campus to attend workshops and hear speakers to help us get our first job. I was hired with a month of graduating, with no previous experience in tech. They also have a wealth of free resources for their alumni. 

    Cons
    - Hard and time-consuming - It is a hard program. Not every one who started in our cohort finished it. It is 5 days a week of 8 hours of classes, then projects take up most of you evening and weekends. It is intense. 
    - Expensive - It is a big investment of money, as well as time. In my case the investment was well worth it, but if it's something you want to just do as a hobby or for non-career reasons, this will end up being a pretty expensive route. 
    - Required extra-curricular - The program includes non-technical requirements that I wasn't the biggest fan of. Like twice weekly yoga is mandatory. Attending Engineering Empathy classes, (that were basically like group therapy were you're expected to share a lot), are required. Many people in my cohort liked it, I personally would have preferred the program without it. 

    Overall: I recommend it all the time. Despite the time, effort, and cost of the program, I think it is a great choice for anyone looking to enter the world as a developer. 

    I do want to mention that if you don't live in a place where these programs are common, (like SF, NY, Boston, etc), it may be a little harder to get a job with this. If companies in your area have not seen many alumni of bootcamps being successful in development environments, they will be skeptical of hiring someone with only a few months of training instead of a CS degree.