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The Iron Yard

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The Iron Yard

Avg Rating:4.42 ( 173 reviews )

As of July 20, 2017, The Iron Yard is no longer accepting applications. The Iron Yard is a technology education company that offers software development courses both in person, and through corporate training programs across the US. The school offers full-time and part-time immersive programs in Web Development. Beginners can choose from Web Development Basics or Interactive Web Development courses. For career changers, The Iron Yard's flagship bootcamp is the Web Development Career Path, which takes students from zero to job ready. Graduates of the Web Development Career Path will be well-versed in front end and back end fundamentals, and participate in The Iron Yard's Career Support program. 

The Iron Yard team strives to create real, lasting change for people, companies, and communities by equipping a diverse workforce with 21st-century digital skills. Since it was launched in 2013, The Iron Yard has prepared thousands of students for careers in technology.

 

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  • Omar • Front End Developer • Graduate
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    I am a recent Iron Yard front-end graduate from the Dallas campus and this review is real and genuine.

    Sure, you could do the whole self-taught programmer route. But what coding bootcamps, such as The Iron Yard (TIY) , do for you is speed up the process tremendously. TIY provides a safe and nurturing programming environment for newbie coders. 

    The teacher, Eric, is an extremely experienced programmer who has TONS of REAL world experience.  He will calmly and patiently explain the ins and outs of whatever topics you're interested in.  Just make sure to slow him down as he is a fast typer!

    The curriculum is intensive just like all other bootcamps. You have 3 months to learn what could be done in a year. So it's non-stop knowledge all up in your face. Eric won't mind slowing down, but there is a lot to cover in class. Thankfully, he's very available after class to sit down and go through it with you.

    The homework and projects are either very "real-world" or help you think like a Javascript programmer. We actually got to make a website that is now live online.

    The admin is extremely helpful to all students. Caitlin and Colin work very hard to make sure we're taken care of.   Tons of networking opportunities.  Towards the end it gets a bit hectic with final projects, resume building, portfolios, and career support. Time management is essential if you're going to be a bootcamp student.

    Speaking of career support, it's definitely available and it's really helpful.  They helped me restructure my resume and LinkedIn, as well as gave me advice on my portfolio. They constantly send job openings our way and keep a look out for anything in particular we're interested in.

    Other than that, we had guest lectures almost every week where we got to speak and listen to people who are out there in the field.  We had a field trip to a big tech company which was really nice. Wish we had more of those though.

    In conclusion, is it expensive? Yes. But is it worth it in the long run? YES. Once you graduate, you're still a "student". You get all the ongoing support, you can always ask Eric how to do something new you're trying to learn, they'll always keep a look out for jobs , and you can always go in and talk to them. Totally worth the lifetime membership.

  • Amazing Experience
    - 10/10/2016
    Jacolby Green • Graduate
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    I took the Front-End Development course at The Iron Yard here in Dallas, Tx. It has been one of the greatest learning experiences that I have ever encountered. I was shocked that one could actually learn so much within a three-month period. One of my favorite take-aways is the fact that The Iron Yard set me on a path where learning on my on is very possible! The instructor is very knowledge on a wide-range of technologies and really puts forth the effort to make sure that we had a good grasp of the concepts that he teached. The staff here in Dallas is nothing short of amazing! Oh yeah, you will probably become a ping-pong master if you decide to enroll! 

  • Mark • Lead Web Developer • Graduate
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    I went into The Iron Yard, with a little background in programming already, I knew basic HTML and CSS, plus I've had some previous programming experience with Swift. So I was a little skeptical at first, joining a course for absolute beginners.

    However, I ended up in an amazing class with the best teacher I've ever had. She acknowledged that I was ahead of the class, and pushed me to my limits. Spent extra time creating a more challenging curriculum for me, and held me to a very high standard. This allowed me to learn sooo much more than I otherwise would have at any other coding school, where they don't tailor the curriculum to fit their student's skill set.

    Besides the teacher, the campus director, is quite simply the nicest person alive. Halfway through my course, I lost my home. I came into school the next day expecting to have to quit and take a plane back home, as I had no other options. But the campus director, offered me a place to stay for a few days, then found another alumni I could live with for the remainder of my course. This just goes to show how much these people care about their students. It's truly incredible.

    needless to say, you get out what you put in. I don't think The Iron Yard is necessarily for everyone. But if you are the type who isn't just going to do the bare minimum requirements for a passing grade, but want to put in the effort and aim higher, The Iron Yard is the perfect place for that.

    With an incredible support system, teacher's that really know their stuff, and a great environment for learning. Going to The Iron Yard was by far one of the best decisions I've made in my life.

  • Las Vegas
    - 10/10/2016
    JV • Graduate
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    Attending The Iron Yard Front End Engineering class was probably one of the best decisions of my life. I knew I wanted a career change, especially into anything in the Tech Industry, so when I found out about The Iron Yard and researched what they were about, I was immediately onboard. 

    Mike, who was my instructor, made the stress and horror of learning something so foreign not be as scary as it seemed. Though, there were times things didn't click right away, it eventually did and you always had amazing support, not only from the staff, but your class mates as well. You walk out of The Iron Yard with not only a new skill, but many new friends. 

    Once I graduated, there was a moment that I did feel lost because I wasn't sure what to do next. However, Gabe, the Campus Director, was quick to get me back on track and make me feel more confident in what I was doing. He was not only helpful in the process of getting me back on track, but he made it easy and a lot less stressful than it could've been. I've never experienced an establishment with people so eager to see you succeed and it's truly a breath of fresh air.

  • Matt M. • Graduate
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    This course was great. The instructor was very knowledgable and well fit for the job since he has prior experience in many tech companies and several of his own apps on the app store. For the most part, the daily routine was the same: we came in and had a lecture for about an hour and a half to two hours, then we had a lab session where we completed an assignment based on the lecture. The information you learn in the course is presented in a pretty decent curriculum that made it easy to understand with each day's lecture feeding off of prior lectures.  

    That being said, be careful taking this course if you don't have at least some prior experience in programming. I had been studying programming basics for about 6 months before taking this course, and still found parts of it difficult to grasp. When it's over though, you'll be comfortable using Xcode, writing code in both Swift and Objective-C, and using Web Services and APIs in your apps. On the last day of class, we had a demo day where about 50 employers/recruiters came in and viewed our final projects, which was great networking and proactive in getting you set up with a career if you're willing to do the folllow-up work.

  • Efrain Ayllon • Web & Mobile Developer • Graduate
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    Joining The Iron Yard has been the best decision of my life.

    I dropped out of a design degree and joined The Iron Yard. I did the Ruby on Rails course back in 2014 and went from 0 knowledge to about a 75 after graduating. 

    I took a good job right out of the bootcamp and a few months laterI went on to start a company. 

    I recently finished the new iOS course at the Houston campus and already have 4 apps on the AppStore and making revenue off of them. 

    I couldn't recommend this school enough. They treat you like family and help you at all times no matter what the situation is.

  • Seth Baughman • Graduate
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    Before going to The Iron Yard in Indianapolis, I had a good job.  It was incredibly stable, paid plenty, had fantastic benefits, and I loved my co-workers. I hated it.  I felt trapped, spending the majority of my waking hours in an environment with minimal mental stimulation and career advancement prospects that, while lucrative, made me about as excited as hitting myself in the head with a hammer.

    Fast forward to my post-TIY experience.  I make more.  I work less.  I love when I work.  I have incredible schedule flexibility and can do my job from virtually anywhere.  Most importantly, I've learned more in the last 8 months than I have in the previous 5 years.

    I almost didn't go through with it.

    Before attending, I did my due diligence, like you clearly are if you are reading this review.  The one-star reviews frightened me.  It's a big investment of time, money, and effort.  It's incredibly frightening to take a risk and walk away from all the known quantities of your current life, especially when it's obvious that it didn't work out for some people.  Sure, it seemed like there were plenty of five-star glowing reviews as well, but what if I ended up as one of those one-star people?

    After meeting with Emily, the campus director, and Chris, the instructor, my fears were assuaged but not banished.  The thought of becoming a one-star person kept me up at night.  I practically had the refund policy memorized.  I was a bundle of nerves and nearly drove myself insane in the month leading up to the class.

    Then, a realization hit me.  I am not a one-star person.  

    All my fears of failure were based on the assumption that I had no influence over my own experience.  That is the complete opposite of reality.  

    If you're smart, you know it.

    If you're willing to work hard (really hard), you know it.

    If you're willing to ask for help, you know it.

    If you're willing to do all the things for career support that Emily asks you to do and you temporarily hate both the things and Emily but that's fine because it's for your own good, you know it.

    So, I put 5-star effort into my pre-work for the course.  I made sure to do 5-star work while I was there.  I made 5-star friends amongst my classmates.  I now have the 5-star life I wanted, and that's why I'm writing a 5-star review for TIY.

    Bonus material: 

    Here's a clip from the movie The Edge.  Go watch it now, get AMPED, and then sign the f**k up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9ajZhH-yds

  • Shawn Cothran • The Front End Developer • Graduate
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    I graduated from the Iron Yard - Front End Engineering course that ran from Oct 2015 to Jan 2016. The course was very well taught, very challenging, and I believe it was pretty open and honest in regard to expectations after graduating. Nobody guaranteed me a job, but everyone from my cohort got one... I personally love my new position (7 months strong as of writing this review), I'm sure that differs case by case. So for what it's worth, I think TIY Nashville is a great choice for people that like making stuff and thinking hard.

    Sure, I could have learned much of this stuff on my own if I had the time and resources to do so, but would I have? No. I wouldn't have the confidence, connections, support, or wellrounded perspective I got from TIY. I knew I couldn't get myself job-ready in 12 weeks. The Iron Yard did! I suppose I could have gotten bitter during the Career Support portion after graduation, when they weren't applying for jobs for me, even making me write my own resume and be an adult and everything! ;) Some people did get disillusioned, but generally those were the same people who were getting bitter and having bad attitudes during school too. But even in the face of real difficulty finding work for some students, Josh and Bethany at TIY Nashville gave nothing less than legendary levels of support while I was job hunting. It has really changed the course of my life in a great way.

    When you apply, they ask you why you want to attend... really think about it. Do you really want to sit behind a screen looking at lines of code for the rest of your working life? It isn't for everyone! I tend to like it! And as is the case with most thing worth doing, you get out of it what you put into it. Of course YMMV! For me, I had a wife and two kids to provide for, so I busted my ass on school while working part time on top of it, applied to more jobs than most people in my class in the first couple weeks after graduation, and got a great job! Part support driven, part luck, part timing, part personality, and a large part effort.

    If you're considering TIY, go talk to someone there. Everyone I had the privelege to learn under was so generous, helpful, genuine and skilled. I recommend it highly. The internet is so polarizing, with mostly 1 star and 5 star reviews, don't believe the hate... or the hype! See for yourself at your local campus. Who knows what good could come from it.

  • Isaiah Fasoldt • Graduate
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    I’m writing this because I came here myself to read what was said about the Iron Yard before I decided to take the course, and I found what people said to be helpful, both the critical and the superlative. If, after reading this you have any questions, hit me up on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/isaiahfasoldt. I’d be happy to talk about my experience over the phone or in person. That’s how I made my decision, I contacted a bunch (5) of people who did the Iron Yard in Indianapolis and asked how it was.

    So first things first. I’m only reviewing The Iron Yard Indianapolis Back-end 12-week course. I can’t speak really at all to the organization as a whole, the instructor quality around the country, or even, for that matter, the instructor quality in the front-end course in Indianapolis (I know that he’s a good guy, but I didn’t take class with him). From what I understand, it’s a good market around the country for programmers, and especially so in Indianapolis. But maybe it’s not in your area. So my review is limited in scope.

    But here’s what I do know. Today is Saturday. I presented my final project to a representatives from probably 25+ companies this past Thursday. By Friday night, I had two interviews lined up with exciting companies that I would absolutely love to work for. I’m in conversation with another awesome company that may turn into an interview. Still another business, that has hired multiple grads in the past, has told me that they are going to contact me soon. I haven’t “applied” for a position yet. I may in the future, but if I do, the network of connections that the Indianapolis branch has may prove invaluable. No, I haven’t been handed a job. But I have been put in a position to take advantage of tremendous opportunities.

    And I’m not alone. Out of the 10 students (4 back-end, 6 front-end), 1 back-end student got a job week 11, another front-end student got a job offer yesterday (Friday, for those who are counting). And again, I don’t think any of this was from “applying”. Most of us have barely started the job search process.

    So the course. Let’s see. It’s tough and time consuming. You probably need to be decently bright to do it (not like brilliant or anything, just generally intelligent). If you feel like college is too tough for you (not like writing essays, or something, but like the academic level as a whole), than you probably shouldn’t start from scratch with the Iron Yard. It’s not that coding is too tough for you, but maybe the speed at which the course moves would be.

    Also, if you can’t commit to putting in some HARD work, than the Iron Yard is not for you. I spent probably 75 hours a week. 8 hours in class and 4 hours at home M-F. And then 15 hours on the weekend. I have a 2 year old daughter; I was a bit of an absent parent for the three months. My angel of a wife picked up a lot of the parenting slack for me. I’m an avid video gamer, a netflix watcher. I played maybe 5 hours of video games total and watched exactly 0 hours of Netflix during the course. I still went to church. I still found time to take a Saturday and make my wife a birthday dinner. We celebrated our 5th wedding anniversary by going out to eat at a nice restaurant, not by taking a camping trip like I had planned. So it takes sacrifices. As other people have noted, you get out what you put in.

    That commitment applies to the pre-work that they hand you as well. Probably my biggest criticism of my time is that it didn’t feel like the pre-work was emphasized enough. I did all of it, and some extras, but some students came in without having finished it. It makes a huge difference. There’s no time to catch up during the course, so if you start off behind, it’s difficult, really difficult.

    The instructor, Chris, is gifted as both a programmer and a teacher. I don’t say this lightly. I did TeachForAmerica in the South Bronx for 5 years. I know what a good teacher looks like, as well as a crappy teacher. Chris is a great teacher. Ryder, who I know well (hey man!), mentions below that the teaching was overly didactic and lecture based. That’s fair criticism. The schedule is lecture from 9 am to noon, lunch, lab from 1pm-5pm. 3 hours of lecture is a lot, but it worked well for me, and is probably necessary to get through the amount of content that we did. To be fair, at least with us, Chris did do a lot of code review, and answered the 1 BILLION questions that we (mostly I) asked in class. He always took time to answer our questions in as much detail as we wanted. I will say that you have to get over your fear of looking stupid by asking a question. Different people get lost at different places and there’s no time to teach everything from 5 different angles. Chris will teach it from the angle that he knows from experience works best, and if you let it be known that you don’t get it (which will be often, it’s just part of the experience), he will explain it from a different perspective. Also, the “lecture” is really him coding in front of you narrating along the way. In education-speak, we’d call this modeling, and Chris is a master of it.

    Lab time is when you get the daily homework (or weekend if it’s Thursday). It's always almost exactly what Chris did or you in the lecture, but with enough differences that you can't just copy his code. (He almost always puts his code from lecture online as well for reference) You sit and bang your head against the wall until it makes sense. If you get stuck, you try to figure it out for yourself for about 10-15 minutes (Hint: google your problem, someone somewhere has run into the exact same issue. Also, it’s probably on the stackoverflow). If you can’t get it after a few minutes, you call over your instructor, and he’ll take as long as he needs to get you to a point where you can continue on your own. Then you run into another wall and repeat the process. Sound frustrating? It is. But it’s also the best way to learn. Learning to deal with frustration and failure is one of the most important skills that a programmer can have. As Chris says a million times: “Nothing works on the first try”. And it’s true, even when he’s doing the coding in front of us in class. Even his mistakes are part of that modeling process. The only criticism I have of lab time is that there were a few days when he had other job duties (like interviewing future students) that made him less available, and left us stuck in places longer than we would have liked. It didn’t happen a lot, but it did happen occasionally. That said, he was generally available on slack (chat messaging) until nearly midnight, and usually responded immediately. All in all, he was very accessible.

    Here’s another thing, there’s nothing special about the concepts that are learned at the Iron Yard, no special formula for the homework. People mention that it’s all readily available online. It probably is. I mean, heck, everything I learned in both my bachelor’s degree in Philosophy/Ancient Languages and Master’s degree in Education is online too! You could absolutely learn everything that the Iron Yard course offers online. Lots of programmers are self-taught. If you can learn enough to convince someone to give you a job, you probably don’t need the Iron Yard. You’ll learn on the job and get paid at the same time. The more power to you! I could have done that myself. But it would have taken me years and years instead of 3 months. Here’s the truth, you’re not paying for the material, you’re paying for the accelerated learning that having an experienced teacher allows. And you’re paying for the reputation of the school with employers and the network it has.

    About that network. Emily, the campus director in Indianapolis does an outstanding job of cultivating relationships with the tech community. The advisory board for the Indianapolis campus reads like a who’s who of tech companies in the area. The vast majority of the tech people I met with at local meetups had heard of the Iron Yard, had a positive impression of it. Lots knew Emily and/or Chris personally. Emily does everything she can to throw potential employers into your path, from scheduling them as guest speakers, to offering the campus space to tech meetups, to hosting mixers and networking events for students and employers. You still need to have your own hustle, of course, but it’s that much easier. Emily's also wonderfully and brutally honest. If you're not cutting it, she'll let you know. Her previous job was as a tech recruiter, so she knows exactly what it takes to get hired as a software engineer. She runs trainings on resumes, portfolios, etc, that get you looking good to employers.

    This has become a super long review. But I’m including all the things that would have made my decision that much easier. Best of luck to you in the decision making process.

     
  • Ryder Timberlake • Software Engineer at Salesforce • Student
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    I was part of the February 2016 Rails cohort on the Indianapolis campus. While there are many fine schools in the Iron Yard network, I am speaking to my own experience and do not assert any generalizability of said experience to other campuses.

    The Iron Yard Indianapolis (TIYI from here on out) is a fantastic and well-connected coding immersion program designed to take people with little or no coding experience and get them junior developer jobs. Like the overwhelming majority of bootcamps, employment is not guaranteed. For many reasons -- including the professional performance of alumni and the breadth and depth of the TIYI network -- employment as a developer is, however, very likely.

    Also -- and I cannot stress this enough -- what you get out of it mostly depends on what you put into it.

    TIYI is staffed by experienced and driven personnel who are good at their jobs, enjoy their work, and are genuinely concerned about their students and graduates.

    I will now state my biggest complaint, and the primary reason why I dinged TIYI for a star -- the curriculum. While I completed several pair and group projects throughout the Rails engineering course, other than that there was very little collaboration during both lab and lecture. Although we have a gifted instructor and tremendous development resource in Chris Vannoy, I found lecture to be oppressively didactic.

    I would have preferred to pair on most of the work I did throughout the course -- like they do at Hack Reactor -- and I did not find the policy on pairing during lab to be clearly articulated. I asked about it multiple times and still didn't feel I understood where the boundary was -- consequently I did most of my work alone. While I still benefited from problem-solving in this way, I think this is far from the ideal way to prepare new developers to constructively and effectively communicate their ideas, or to work together in a common code base.

    You should also understand that you're not going to get handed a job coming out of this -- well some of you might, but you shouldn't count on it. My buddy Seth had a fantastic job lined up at week 6, but most of us weren't so lucky -- the last stat I heard touted was that most students who find a dev job take about a month to do so. Personally I could have had a job at week 11, but I didn't land the job I wanted until a month and a half after graduating. That job, however, was at Salesforce -- a company that pretty much categorically does not hire juniors for anything more than internships -- so you should take that as another feather in TIYI's cap.

    Emily Trimble (the TIYI dean) is a formidable career resource to whom I am deeply indebted. Also understand that this is not a 12-week program; it is a 16-week program after you factor in the job search. Pace yourself accordingly.

    Our Rails instructor has great natural aptitude for teaching. He also possesses the necessary (and rare) combination of technical and communicative ability needed to teach development effectively.

    I did struggle with lecture more than any other part of the curriculum, and it's because for most of our classroom time I was bored. Or mad. Or both.

    Lecture was didactic in nature -- there was little time allocated in class to collaboration or code review, and the methodology was far from Socratic. Partly I am sympathetic, as our cohort was full of tough nuts to crack and it would have taken skillful, consistent, and early intervention to establish an open and collaborative dynamic. That's in addition to the constraints being imposed by Iron Yard central, of which I am ignorant.

    But it was still hard, and not in an expected way. Maybe in a way that ultimately challenged and served me well -- another reason for only dinging the one star -- but hard.

    Really hard.

    Know what you want to get out of TIYI before you go in. Have at least a general idea of what kind of place you want to work at and in what capacity. If you have never read What Color is Your Parachute? or really done the work to understand yourself and your goals, please do that first. You don't have to live and breathe code (though many if not most do during the course), or even be a developer for the rest of your life, but make sure you have an endgame here.

    Once you're there -- hey, congratulations. If you really took the time to think things through before signing up, you've just made what could easily become the best career decision of your life.  Take a second to pat yourself on the back.

    Now remember how you checked things out thoroughly before deciding this was right for you? That means you already have an endgame. Take the time to share that endgame -- to the extent that you're comfortable and maybe a bit more -- with the staff.

    Nobody's going to do this for you. If you want to get more than the basic package out of this, you'll need to put in the work yourself. If you have some goals while you're here and can share them, you'll get help. If it's possible to share those things with your cohort as well, by all means do so.

    If you are looking at attending, I would say that it is equally as important to know who you will be attending with as to know the staff.

    Overall, the Iron Yard Indianapolis is an amazing program. It deserves a place at the top of the list of anyone with patience, persistence, and technical ability who is looking to change careers in this part of the country.

  • Matthew Wright • Junior Developer • Graduate
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    In August of 2015 I found myself growing more and more desparate to find employment as I had been unemployed over a year and running out resources to support myself. I was depressed and felt worthless and didn't really want to go anywhere because I'd see people living and doing things with their lives and would feel alienated because I wasn't doing much with my life but not for lack of trying. 

    One day I was browsing through my twitter feed and ran across an article about coding camps in other cities and the success the graduates had after graduating a course that only took 3 months, I was skeptical but also intrigued enough to Google for code camps in Houston. I found the Iron Yard, told my girlfriend about it and she encouraged me to go up to the campus and at least check it out. I met Brian Dorton who welcomed me like I was an old friend and asked me about myself and my background, I was totally open and honest with him about my situation and he told me I should apply.

    I did and was later accepted, I felt a great deal of responsibility on my shoulders because I took this opportunity as a "second chance" to do something that made me feel worthy, something I could be proud of. 

    I took the Ruby/Rails course and weeks before we started, my teacher Jesse provided us with internet resources that we should have a look at to get familiar with the language and concepts. I spent pretty much all of my time on Codeschool.com which is a resource I still use to this very day and by the first day of Iron Yard I was nervous but also energized and ready to hit the ground running. 

    We had a small class, maybe 15 people and I soon learned that my teacher JWo is a cool guy and likes to have fun, but when it's time to get down to business, he's not going to hold your hand or baby you, it's literally a boot camp, with comfortable seats and great coffee. Jesse has a talent for assessing where his students are and determining who genuinely needs help getting up to speed and he would deal with those students accordingly, whether that's staying after class for a bit or making himself available via Slack or Phone. 

    The course was intense and 'intense' might even be an understatement, after the first week, I didn't get a single night of sleep where I wasn't dreaming about code, I was fully immersed in it EVERY day of the week so I fully agree with others who say "you get what you put into this course", it's absolutely true. 

    There were many times that I'd try to compare my progree to my classmates and would sometimes feel like I wasn't quite measuring up to them only to talk to those same people and discover they felt the same things, I used this as motivation to put in extra time at home studying or not leaving the Iron Yard until at least 75% of that night's homework was complete. 

    Every week we'd have to turn in a lab and every week was filled with anxiety and worries of whether or not I'd be able to finish it on time or if it'd be up to the standard that my teacher expected. In hindsight I appreciate the terror I felt because if the pressure wasn't there, I believe I wouldn't have put in the level of effort I did or stay up until midnight every night knowing I'd have to be at the bus stop at 7am the next morning.

    In my first meeting with Brian, he told me that the Iron Yard is something that could change my life and it was a statement that really didn't have as much impact as it did on graduation day, I was in a space where I felt like I could add value to my life and the immediate lives around me, I was able to make connections that resulted in me find employment less than two weeks of me graduating and I owe all of it to the Iron Yard. 

    If you're interested in this program and you don't have the time to fully devote yourself to it, I'll straight up recommend that you don't apply because you will only get out of this program what you put into it. 

  • My Experience
    - 6/6/2016
    Devin • Student
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    At the Iron Yard DC you'll find a caring staff and well-educated and talented instructors. That being said, it's very difficult to learn how to code in 3 months, so your best chance of success is prep as much as you can before you get there. There's loads of free resources online. Do as many as you can that way when you get there you can take advantage of the skilled staff. In other words, it's hard to know what questions to ask if you haven't done any learning ahead of time. The more prepared you are, the more you can get out of it and when you leave you'll have a good foundation to start your coding journey.

  • Sean Calkins • iOS Developer • Graduate
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    I'm amazed at some of these negative reviews. They tell you up front that it won't be easy. It seems like people expect to just be handed everything after paying tuition. Learning to code takes time and persistence. Not only do you have to work hard during the course, you need to work hard afterwards on your job hunt. Boot camps aren't for everyone, they are for self motivated hard working people that are willing to put in the time required to succeed. It's not just a free job. I spent a few weeks post graduation either coding or job hunting all day and got a job. My instructor and campus director were both amazing and did everything they could for me WHEN I ASKED. It's not just about leaving a three month course with everything you'll ever need. You learn how to learn. You learn how to work through problems and keep at it until you find the right way. I would absolutely recommend this program to anyone (excluding someone who is consistently lazy and expects everyone to do their work for them).

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    I attended the Iron Yard after realizing the amount of time it would take to teach myself how to code while working 50 - 60 hours a week.  The course was intense and it taught me how to program and what it means to be a developer, along with interview and job search skills.  As far as helping you find jobs the staff will help you as much as they can, but the few positions that are posted to students are usually looking for people with more experience then you will have coming out of the program.  I did have trouble initially finding work after leaving the program, and the high price for a class with no credit hours to show has been an issue in my new role.  My advice to anyone thinking of attending the Iron Yard is to evaluate why you want to take the course, realize what the expected salary is for a graduate (most make around $35K), take classes online where you actually write programs, and realize that you will still need to further educate yourself after graduating.  All in all it was a great experience and I wish my college was more like the Iron Yard.

  • Unimpressed • Software Developer
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    Let me start by saying I have a job as a developer now - but only because after my bad experience I took it upon myself to try another bootcamp and online course with CodeSchool. The way this course is sold to the applicants is that ANYBODY can do it if they put in the time, dedication, hard work, and willingness to learn. That is true for any field really but I definitely fell for that speech and joined the course. We were also told that you can go from "0 to hero" basically you don't have to have any programming knowledge and they can take you to a junior developer in 3 months. Basically you can make it through this camp if you ALREADY know how to code. They ask you to study tutorials before you get there to know the basics but I found I was basically teaching myself. I don't mind that of course because I ended up doing it after the camp ended but for all the money you have to pay, that's ridiculous to pay to teach yourself! Add the fact that you MUST have a Mac, which is not a requirement at most jobs. (I asked in different interviews.) Please just take your time with enrolling at TIY. Ask many questions, don't get caught in the hype. If you want connections and job opportunities just join the tech meetups in Indy. Saying you went to TIY won't get you far, they already have a bad reputation starting because our community is so small. I asked at a few meetups what complete strangers thought of them (I never said I went there) and the response was not surprising. Word traveled quickly that the course material was all over the place, the administration was stuffy, and for the price you can take a superb course online or at Eleven Fifty if you really want class instruction. I'll leave on a good note though... the idea behind it is great. Small classes, individual attention, classmates are usually really cool (because we love tech), beer, and insider info on the tech scene in Indy was great. But then again you can get that for free at a meetup!

    PART 2:

    Sorry I forgot to add that: 1. I found all the homework assignments on YouTube. Why should I pay for material that was taken from Treehouse, Google, and/or YouTube?? 2. People have different learning styles so I don't understand all the positive reviews when they say it's a bootcamp it's supposed to be fast. Being too fast wasn't the big issue really, it was the unorganized, stolen material. The unanswered questions. The guess everything approach. Google it... yes we're going to be problem solvers but I wanted to LEARN it first. Then I can solve the problems! 3. Seriously the tuition baffles me. I agree with the several reviews on the price. They'll try to tell you it's because you MAY graduate and find an entry level position for $40,000 per year or more.... they are not Hack Reactor so they shouldn't be making such foolish claims to suck people in.

  • iOS Developer
    - 1/27/2016
    Kelly Robinson • iOS Developer • Graduate
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    So I was reading through reviews of The Iron Yard (I just graduated in December 2015) and was unpleasantly surprized that anyone would not love and respect the entire experience that going there was all about! First thing is first: THIS IS A BOOTCAMP SCHOOL!! If you have a difficult time going at a fast pace, you might need to check out private tutoring or traditional schooling. Second: I HAVE NEVER, EVER, EVER, HAD AN INSTRUCTOR BEND OVER BACKWARDS FOR EVERYONE IN THE CLASS ANYTIME AND EVERYTIME THEY NEEDED IT! This includes sometimes walking away to teach us that we can walk on our own and that we can do it without them standing over our shoulders all the time. Third: The support from the ENTIRE staff from the higher ups at the school to the other instructors is unsupassed and is better than I have recieved even from my own family! They are here to help and to give you any extra attention that you ask for ( I asked for help from the other instructors and they did not hesitate once to try to walk me through a language they didn't know anything about.) I would not trade my experience for anything in the world and if you are on the fence about going ... DO IT!! Or talk to one the amazing people who dedicate so much of their time to helping you to succeed! I feel confident in saying that I am now an iOS Developer and I feel confident about my abilities coming out of the program. DO IT!!

  • Worth it
    - 1/19/2016
    Anonymous • Junior Software Developer • Graduate
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    To reiterate what another graduate said in another review, "you get what you put into it." This class is for the self-driven and for the motivated. The instructors are brilliant minds, great teachers, and offer great support, but if you expect someone else to do your work and research for you then you have another thing coming. BUT, with that being said, taking this class was the best decision I have made for myself. I came out of the course with more practical skills and knowledge than my four year IT degree ever gave me. Not only that, but the instructors really teach you how to teach yourself and tell you how to find resources on new technology. This has made learning a new language at my current job actually achievable. If I had the time and money I would go back and take the other classes that the Iron Yard offers too. 

     

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    Did I come out of the course as a front-end developer ready to dive into the tech-world? I can definitely make it look that way on paper to try and land me interviews, but the fact of the matter is this: I wanted so badly to convince myself these twelve sleepless weeks were worth it, that my final project was something creative and impressive that encompassed everything I painstakingly learned from the course, and that most importantly, I would get a return on my $12,000 investment; however, the more I think about it all, now that I've been able to sleep, I've realized that I walked away with not much more than a $12,000 "diploma" that may help me get my foot in the door and get some interviews. In no way do I feel like I actually learned what I wanted to convince myself I did.

    I will go ahead and get this out of the way. There were two instructors. One was nice and approachable, and the other seemed as if he couldn't have cared less about being there. I remember once, on a Friday after class, the latter had gone to 'happy hour' and when he came back, I asked for help with something. He started to help, then stated he was too inebriated to assist me! I discounted this "instructor" immediately as being of any use to me

    So, let's say that one "instructor" actually counted as one. There was still a 1:10 instructor to student ratio. With 22 students, The Iron Yard's budget was $264,000, which should have been more than enough to hire a couple more teachers. So why were there so many issues? I don't know, but here is a list of them:

    -       There was a huge disparity between the knowledge gained during lecture and the knowledge needed to complete the assignments. Thinking outside the box is great, but being told to Google possible solutions to an already trial-and-error process wasn't acceptable.

    -       The instructor-to-student ratio was a joke. This lead to a “first come/first serve” arrangement to get help after lecture. When asking for help, I was too often told to look for an answer via an external resource. This resulted in an inordinate number of hours spent on guess work.

    -       The absence of feedback from completed assignments was detrimental to the learning process. If you don’t understand your mistakes, how can you possibly know how to proceed with future assignments? If I had been shown how the code for the previous assignments could be more professionally and efficiently accomplished, it would have allowed me to use that knowledge moving forward. This caused unnecessary struggle of making the same mistakes.

    -       With the degree of dedication and effort put into every day, I shouldn't have felt stranded. I relied heavily on collaboration with other students to complete assignments. While collaboration is good, many people were struggling with the same problems as me. This resulted in a cluster of random ideas and possible solutions.

    I wish I could get my time and money back and just start studying on my own. This was a terrible experience, and I hope that if you decide to take the plunge, that your’s is better than mine.

    Thanks for reading.

  • Ben Doane • Graduate
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    Above all else: you will get out of this course, what you put into it. And I wish I had done this in place of going to college. Fact.

    I was part of a cohort that only graduated 4. A smaller class, to be sure.

    The instructor was fantastic with being able to work with those of differing levels of knowledge, and he was literally one message away nearly all hours of the day and night (even at 11pm, he was still answering questions and helping direct if we got stuck on something!). He also did an amazing job of making sure we had exposure to all the programs, gems, work-flow styles, etc. that are being used in tech companies today. On numerous site visits with companies, they mentioned hoping to find individuals with the exact skills and knowledge we were(or had) learning in the course. 

    Personally, I had NO knowledge prior to the course, other than pre-course work that I did the week before classes began. Now, I'm applying for jobs as a Jr. Developer, and I've met amazing people in the tech community along the way. I did my best to get out there and meet people at tech meet-ups and mixers, I worked hard to get as far on assignments as I could (which, btw, I LOVED the set-up of difficulty for each assignment), and I took notes. 

    The campus director was such a great part of helping with resume building, reviewing, and helping to make sure we were connected when those tech events were happening. She's one of the best-connected educational resources I've had (and I'm including my state university in that comparison).

    Mind you, I worked part-time through all of this, averaging around 20 hours a week at my job (resulting in a few weeks at or around 70 hour work weeks).  I worked over 640 hours alone towards the coursework during the 12 week class (though mine was 14 weeks because of Holidays). It was tough, but the more time you invest, the more you will learn and get out of it. It was worth every minute. Every. Single. Minute.

    I have nothing but gratitude, respect, and appreciation for the Iron Yard of Indy. I walked away with knowledge of coding, a new way of looking at and solving problems, and an appreciation for the tech we use every day. I am now starting my career in development...and I owe it to Iron Yard. 

    You can feel free to personally contact me if you want to know more - seriously. I stand behind this program 100%. Absolutely, completely, life-changing.

  • Java
    - 1/14/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    I think I've re-written this review several different times now considering how I want to say what I want to say about this particular program.

    The fact is:  I just graduated.

    Do I have interviews lined up?  Absolutely.

    All of my interviews are with some very big names here in Charleston.

    Will I get a job?  I certainly hope so.

    I've read all of reviews for TIY, not only the ones recently posted for the Charleston campus.  All I have to say in response to the more negative ones is:  "I have my opinions on the style of management, what the company could have done better to really bring home the perceived value, and everything under the sun including the shade of blue they used to paint the walls."

    However none of these opinions are relevant to the question at hand.  The question being:  "Did you learn how to code?"

    Yes.

    "Was it easy?"

    No.  I've noticed a trend in life.  That trend being:  "Nothing in life that is worth while is easy."

    The amount of benefit you will receive from this program is directly proportional to the work that you put into it.

    If you have questions; ask, ask, ask, ask, ask.  If you don’t then your instructor will either 1) think you are a Clojure aficionado or 2) you just don’t care?  My point is the instructors are programmers not mind readers!

    Now…..to my Java instructor:

    Zach Oakes is one of the most intelligent people I have had the privilege to study under.  He has a decade worth of experience, AT LEAST.  He is a well-respected member of the tech community.  His work has been honorably mentioned in a few books, his tech-talks are well received and reviewed, and most importantly he is “out-of-the-box.”

    TDLR;

    If you’re expecting an easy ride TIY probably isn’t your best bet.

    However if can work hard, power through the tough times, and keep focused you will be pleasantly surprised with the results.  I know I was.

  • Anonymous • Graduate
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    A crazy, rewarding experience. Before I officially enrolled in the program, the campus director and instructor were very open and willing to answer my questions. They were up front and honest about what to expect and what I should do to prepare and get the most out of it. For instance I really appreciated being given pre-work to work through ahead of time— it made things go more smoothly the first few weeks and got me in the right mindset (you wouldn’t run a marathon without stretching beforehand, right?).

    Of course the course itself was difficult, but I did sign up for a challenge, and with that much to cover in a short amount of time it’d be unreasonable to expect lengthy explanations of every detail (again, we were forewarned). It’s a shift in learning style but it’s one that will serve us well in the future. The instructor made himself very available to help us out if we felt lost (he talked me down from the proverbial ledge on more than one occasion). Lectures sometimes wandered away from the main topics, but this was often due to a student’s line of questioning— while that could be frustrating, it speaks to the instructor’s desire to make sure we felt comfortable speaking up if we had a question.

    At the end of the course I felt far more prepared for the job hunt than I ever have before. The campus director passed along a ton of job postings and gave us a lot of great examples for cover letters, resumes, and portfolios; she was quick to give us helpful feedback and advice on the aforementioned and on networking/reaching out to possible employers. We went through mock interviews and got feedback quickly, which made me feel more comfortable with what to expect in a real interview experience.

    tl;dr: Yes, it’s a challenge, no, you won’t be spoon-fed. The fast pace may not be a good fit for everyone (and that’s okay) but if you prepare yourself and keep at it then it’ll work for you. I tried to self-teach before and there is absolutely no way I could have gotten myself to this level in the same amount of time. That's not to say I've mastered everything, but I do know I’m prepared to start a career as a developer and to keep learning as I go.

  • Jet • Graduate
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    The nature of this profession, software engineering, is learning by doing. It is not enough to read books and go through free online courses. You have to use that knowledge to build things and keep coding.

    Learning how to learn is the most important take away.

    This is what The Iron Yard is good at. They prepare you for the working world, where the learning never stops anyway. I believe that one's success through this bootcamp, and through life for that matter, depends largely on the attitude you bring and how you handle challenging situations. The outcome is a direct result of your own ability (and willingness) to rise to the challenge and step out of your comfort zone.

    Transformation. That's what attending a bootcamp is about.

    If you go through military bootcamp, the staff sergeant expects you to be able to give him 50 pushups on day one. He won't teach you how to do it, you should already know how. Similarly, in a coding bootcamp, you should come prepared. If you come in expecting to be spoon-fed all the answers, this or any other bootcamp is not for you. There is a reason its called bootcamp and not classes or school.

    The Iron Yard does a great job of setting you up to succeed in the program and in a professional environment. The required pre-work are only some of the basic things one should know coming in. Like doing 50 pushups. Its impossible to teach everyone the same thing and expect every single student to understand the material the way that the best student in class understood it. And in this ever changing industry, learning how to learn is your best bet and it will take you far. Perhaps even farther than that best student in class.

    And when you come out of bootcamp, hopefully you're a better, wiser, more humble person than you were on day one and that you've made some lifelong friends along the way. After all, its not everyday that you're surrounded by like-minded smart people. Cherish it and own the experience.

     

  • Anonymous
    - 1/13/2016
    Anonymous • Graduate
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    Fantastic experience. The dedicated staff ensured a friendly and productive environment as they took us from beginers to junior developers. The coursework as strenuous and I honestly felt like quitting about once every two weeks, but my stubborness wouldn't let me. In the end they taught more than how to program. The more important skills they taught were how to learn on your own and how to work effectively in a group environment. Group projects were the greatest asset to this program. The instructors were knowledgable and willing to help other students that weren't in their personal class. As a backend student I had no problem getting assistance from the front end instructors and vice versa. Fantastic experience. Even though I've graduated, they still help me while I'm on the job hunt. You will get out of this course what you put into it.

  • Anonymous • Student
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    Don't fall for the marketing ploy, they expect students to do a ton of pre-work before taking the class.  Although they advertise that they can take a complete beginner to a junior developer.  My class started with 8 students, only 4 of us will graduate, thankfully, we didn't have to pay the 12k because the campus didn't have their license yet.  The first cohort seems to have faired much better than my cohort, maybe they had some experience.  The instructor is a nice guy, but he doesn't know how to teach, his lectures are unorganized and he loses the class as he goes down rabbit holes.  Unless you have 12k to waste, I would recommend you take full advantage of all the free resources available online or enrolled in treehouse or code academy.  I met some really great people, I especially enjoyed Fridays were we would unwind.  

  • Anonymous • Student
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    Disorganized, poorly prepared, no true teaching experience.from the instructors. Many students were not able to keep up with the instructor, who didn't stop to explain when steps were questioned. I would not recommend this academy until they have lesson plans or some organized teaching process.