learn-academy-logo

LEARN Academy

San Diego

LEARN Academy

Avg Rating:4.43 ( 35 reviews )

LEARN Academy is a 3-month web development bootcamp, with a 1-month internship, in San Diego, California. Aimed at helping students transform their interest in programming into a career, the curriculum focuses on JavaScript, Ruby on Rails, HTML, CSS, React, Git, GitHub, Pair Programming, and more. LEARN Academy is a hands-on, intensive course with daily exercises and coding challenges, landmark skill assessments, industry guest speakers and expert classroom instruction to keep students challenged every day.

After three 3 months of instruction, each student interns at a local San Diego-based tech company to apply their new skills in a real-world work environment and make valuable connections in the industry. As well as teaching students how to code, LEARN covers everything students need to know to land that first job in tech – writing resumes, developing a portfolio, negotiating a good salary, preparing for interviews, learning how to network, and setting up a LinkedIn profile. Even after graduates get that first job, LEARN will help develop your career through ongoing support, alumni events, and additional training.

Recent LEARN Academy Reviews: Rating 4.43

all (35) reviews for LEARN Academy →

Recent LEARN Academy News

Read all (7) articles about LEARN Academy →
  • Full Time Web Developer Bootcamp

    Apply
    MySQL, HTML, Git, JavaScript, jQuery, Rails, CSS, React.js, Front End, Ruby, SQL
    In PersonFull Time40 Hours/week17 Weeks
    Start Date November 2, 2020
    Cost$14,000
    Class size26
    LocationSan Diego
    For three months, you'll spend every weekday from 9 am to 5 pm in our classroom learning how to be a web developer. We'll start the curriculum with the basics, then slowly introduce new concepts. Every day, we'll teach you something new and then you'll get to apply what you learned in a coding challenge. Our curriculum focuses on JavaScript, Ruby on Rails, HTML, CSS, React, Git, GitHub, Pair Programming, and more. At the end of the boot camp, you will get a month-long internship at a local tech company in San Diego. Guaranteed. The internship is a critical component of your time at LEARN where you will get to apply the new skills you've learned, make new and valuable connections, and expand your web development skills. At LEARN, we don't just teach you to code. We teach you how to find a job. We'll teach you everything you need to know to land that first job. Writing resumes, developing your portfolio, negotiating a good salary, preparing for interviews, learning how to network, setting up your LinkedIn profile, and much more. And, even after you get that first job, LEARN will help you develop your career through ongoing support, alumni events, and additional training.
    Financing
    Deposit$500.00
    Financing
    Financing available through SkillsFund and Affirm.
    ScholarshipWe are now offering partial Scholarships & Military Discounts
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelMostly we find that the best candidates are students who have been learning on their own via online learning for a few months. They are now at the point where they want to take the next step.
    Prep WorkWe ask our students to complete some exercises on HTML/CSS and JavaScript.
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewYes
    More Start Dates
    November 2, 2020 - San Diego Apply by November 2, 2020
  • Jumpstart Weekend Bootcamp

    Apply
    HTML, JavaScript, CSS, Front End
    In PersonFull Time0 Weeks
    Start Date October 9, 2020
    Cost$499
    Class sizeN/A
    LocationSan Diego
    Jumpstart is an introduction to modern web development boiled down to a single weekend where you will learn the fundamentals of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Whether you need an introduction to programming, or you are thinking about studying online, or you're thinking about doing a fulltime bootcamp program, Jumpstart will help you figure out your next step. We provide everything you need for the weekend. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are provided, along with beverages and snacks. You just need to bring your curiosity! Ready to LEARN more? When you enroll as a student in a fulltime bootcamp program at LEARN after finishing your Jumpstart bootcamp, we'll credit the full amount of your Jumpstart tuition towards the price of your fulltime bootcamp.
    Financing
    Deposit$499.00
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill LevelN/A
    Placement TestNo
    InterviewNo
    More Start Dates
    October 9, 2020 - San Diego Apply by October 9, 2020

2 Scholarships

  • $500 LEARN Academy Scholarship

    Course Report is excited to offer an exclusive LEARN Academy scholarship for $500 off tuition!

    Eligibility

    Offer is only valid for new applicants. Applicants who have already submitted an application cannot claim this scholarship. & This scholarship cannot be combined with other offers. & No eligibility restrictions.

    Qualifying Courses

    • Full Time Web Developer Bootcamp (San Diego)
  • $500 LEARN Academy Scholarship

    Course Report is excited to offer an exclusive LEARN Academy scholarship for $500 off tuition!

    Eligibility

    Offer is only valid for new applicants. Applicants who have already submitted an application cannot claim this scholarship. & This scholarship cannot be combined with other offers. & No eligibility restrictions.

    Qualifying Courses

    • All courses in San Diego
  • Just Do It
    - 1/4/2016
    Rebecca • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Bootcamps are not intended or the faint of heart. I went to Learn because I know some of the Ruby developpers in San Diego and I really like the inclusive and friendly ethos (MINASWAN!). Learn offers soiid full-stack immersion and it will surely kick your ass to cover material this fast but the team is flexible and fully involved in getting you through. The instructors and administrators really care about the individual students in the class and how where they are going after the end of the course. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Attending Learn Bootcamp was one of the best things I could have done for myself. The adminstrators, teachers and fellow students were great to work with. I was able to learn a tremendous amount in a short period of time from people who are knowledgeable and passionate about coding. Learn not only provided the education, but also the motivation and support to get us all through this type of intense learning. They are very open to feedback and work very hard on our behalf to get us placed in the most ideal internships. I will always look back on my time at Learn fondly. I plan to stay in touch and continue to be a part of the Learn community.

  • Do it!
    - 12/23/2015
    KC • Software Engineering Intern • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    If you're looking for a challenge and you want your career to be a creative outlet, this bootcamp is a good jumpstart into the inventive world of computer programming. LEARN will introduce you to the popular technologies used by many companies (Git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, SQL, RSpec, Ruby, and Rails) and give you the space to create webpages and web applications with motivated peers. A big plus with LEARN is that they're well connected in the programming industry so you're exposed to meeting a lot of developers from around the world. Also, you're given real world coding experience by being placing into an internship at the end of the program. 

    I was apart of LEARN's third cohort.  As many of my classmates and instructors would say, we looked forward to (almost) every day :) 

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I would say I had a fantastic time so far.  Learned much more about Rails and of course utilizing common shortcuts such as utilizing devise and omniauth.  The Ruby, Postgres, and JavaScript sections were pretty good.  I kind of wish the their was a bit more beef on the rails section.  Nonetheless there is a vast amount of reaources out there and having another programmer look over your code realtime is amazing. 

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    Pros: Nice location, instructors are nice. 
    1. The only saving grace for this program is that you get to intern for a company and get real work experience. A lot of the people I met had great internships (myself included) where I learned more than in 3~ weeks than I did in the 3 months I spent at LEARN. You can build great connections with your internship boss and use that to branch out and find work. 
     
    Cons: 
    1. Instructors are all alumni from this program.
    All 3 instructors graduated less than 2 years ago and now they are in charge of teaching the new cohorts how to code. When I asked Hillary (the person who "interviews" you before you officially start the program) who the instructors would be she responded, "The instructor is someone who has 15+ years of experience in this field and is very knowledgeable" only later to find out that he retired and taught us maybe 1 course out of the entire class.  The "lead" instructor was this guy who looked high all the time and had no idea what he was talking about. And about 90% of all lectures were done by the Associate Instructors (again alumni who graduated with less than 2 years of actual developer experience. Some of then never actually got a job and just got hired back so LEARN could inflate their hired numbers)
    When asking questions, instructors often times would say "Let me get back to you" and never really get back to you with a coherent answer. Often times during lectures, there were students who would correct the "instructors" because they were making errors or doing something incorrectly. 
     
    2. Job Hire. 
    In my initial interview with Hillary, I asked what the success rate was for students. She told me that the percentage of all alumni was around 84%~. I asked specifically about the previous cohorts and still got that same number. Fast-forward to "Professional Development Week", the career coach person throws out the same exact number despite maybe 2 months going by. Then fast-forward again, I have completed my internship, I reach out to ask about employment numbers and get the exact same number. There are no specifics, no real data, no concrete evidence ever presented. Just a random statistic that never changes. So in about a 4-5 month span, the success rate has stayed exactly the same? Yea I don't buy it and neither should you. 
     
    3. Cohort Group 
    There is no pre-screening or assessment done before you do this program. Looking back, that should have been a huge red flag that LEARN just wants your money. People in my cohort ranged from being geniuses and having comp-sci backgrounds to people who could barely type. As someone who was middle of the road and understood the concepts after putting in extra work, it was difficult to learn because LEARN operates using paired-programming. Some days I would get steamrolled by the students who already had tech backgrounds and they just wanted to finish the assignment. Other days it was like pulling teeth trying to explain a topic to a student who didn't know the difference between JavaScript and Ruby.  Overall, it was difficult to learn topics consistently and would require HOURS of extra work outside of class to try and understand it. (Also in part because the instructors couldn't/wouldn't help us --> it was part of the learning process )
     
    4. Outdated Technology
    LEARN would always try and flex and say things like "We are constantly evolving and teaching things that meet the demand of the marketplace" in regards to their curriculum. However, they have been teaching the same React/Ruby on Rails curriculum for the last 2 years at least. Newbies reading this should know that Ruby and Ruby on Rails is not big anymore and definitely not big in San Diego, Orange County, or LA (where I am assuming most people attending this program would be from). Rails is popular in San Francisco and New York and even then, you find other programming back-end languages like Java, Python, and Go WAY more in job postings than Ruby on Rails. Is Ruby/RoR a good skill to have? Sure. It's easy to learn but when you’re applying for that Junior position that requires Java or Python, they're not going to choose you. Also, half-way through the program, the instructors decided to stop checking in on student progress. Students had lots of questions and nothing every got answered and we just moved on, wasting about 2 weeks’ worth of projects that got no real answer. Overall, if you're paying this much money for a boot camp, you should be learning the latest and greatest not something that was popular 10 years ago. 
     
    5. Professional Development Week
    You have a whole week break during the cohort where you update your professional appearance on LinkedIn and build a portfolio. You get lecture after lecture on topics ranging on elevator pitches, updating your resume, and updating your LinkedIn. If you want to save yourself the time and energy doing this, just find a portfolio on YouTube and spruce it up and make it your own. Go on LEARN Academy on linked in and just search any alumni (literally any of them that have it) and you can see the paragraph that every single alum has in relation to what they did at LEARN. Also, you get a professional headshot done for all your professional online presence. The Elevator Pitch is just a YouTube video, the portfolio template they give you, and again, you're going to have the exact same blurb as anyone who has ever attended LEARN on your LinkedIn. At the end of the week, you send your resume to Bryan who is the career coach person for feedback. The feedback is honestly not even remotely useful because after independently testing that resume against job postings and resume critics from real developers, my resume would have been instantly scrapped and ghosted. 
     
    Conclusion: Would I do LEARN Academy again? Absolutely not. There's mediocre student support wrapped in "we are a family" mentality which means their niceness covers up the fact that they are in fact, pretty useless.  From teaching yourself, working against other cohort students to try and figure out issues when pair programming, and doing the bare minimum when it comes to updating your social presence, it’s obvious that LEARN is not in it to truly help students succeed and just want your money. Nobody, from the CEO down to the instructors, really has a solid tech/developer background and it shows. I would highly encourage you to consider doing another program that is actually student-focused, has actual instructors that have experience in the industry, and a large reliable network. You are paying 14-20k for this and it should be worth that. But in reality, you are paying 14-20k for a 1-month internship with a local tech company which really makes no sense. 

     
  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I joined LEARN in 2019 to pursue a career as a web developer and was told by them that 85% of their graduates have jobs within six months. I have since found out about 8 months after graduating that, that number is completely made up and it is much harder to get a job then advertised. They make it seem as if it is so easy to break into the tech industry. In reality, you need much more experince then they can offer. They also preach that you don't need prior experience, but that is also a lie. They do give you a good environment to be around and help you start to understand what you are doing, but this is not worth 15k. I strongly advise someone who is looking to joing a coding bootcamp to find one that actually invests in you finding a job. The staff at LEARN are very nice, but I would be too if you paid me 15k to hang out for three months. I'm not saying not to join, but don't expect to get hired afterwards. 

  • Disappointed
    - 2/26/2019
    Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:
    N/A

    I understand that this program seems to have been a success for a handful of individuals . The technique of teaching they provide may work for some, but not all. Everyone has a different learning style and Learn only supports one way, which is peer programming. I understand this is great within a working environment, but not everyone is able to solidify information in that manner when learning something new. When I am spending  8 hrs. a day, plus $14,500,  I should feel I have used my time wisely, rather when I going home frustrated. Expressing my concerns, which they don't like you to complain about anything, just constructive criticism, I was pretty much told maybe this program was not right for me. Which it was not and I withdrew. But that kind of attitude towards some one interested in learning a new skill is undiscerning. They should be more understanding and accommodating to each person's learning style.

    Learn promotes that their camp is for beginners, which it is not. It is more geared towards people with some kind of background in programming, not just an interest. I feel their screening process should be more thorough, with a technical part before officially being accepted into the program. The curriculum was disorganized and hard to follow at times. There are reputable sights to learn Web Development, build a portfolio, provide you skills for interviewing and finding a job. These sights do not cost much or are for free. Not sure what Learn feels they are providing for $14,500, other than  lining their pockets with money. Please consider other options before throwing your money away or going into debt. 

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    Pros: 
    - Excellent career services 
    - Internship included, and some were paid 
    - Curriculum reflected current trends/job opportunities 
    - Flexible with daily lessons based on student needs 
    - LEARN is very involved in the local tech community, so there are a lot of connections to be made 
    - Good work/life balance 
    - School is understanding and respectful of students' external commitments 
    - The people who work at LEARN are wonderful 


    Cons: 
    - Learning material on website sometimes unclear or had mistakes, and continued uncorrected despite student feedback 
    - Few opportunities taken to assess students' knowledge, no code reviews 
    - Morning lessons frequently ended with "So does that make sense to everybody? *silence* Great!" 
    - Instructors always willing to help, but not always experienced enough to be able to help 
    - Pair programming required, but can be more inhibiting than helpful depending on individual learning style 


    Bottomline: 
    - Glad I did LEARN, certainly a good way to change careers and get your foot in the door with the internship. At the end of the day I'm confident I'll get a job and I'm excited to start a new career, but it was a windy road at times 


    Advice to LEARN: 
    - designating a scrum master would help with continuous improvement 
    - if resources allow, code reviews would be very beneficial to students

  • Anonymous • Graduate
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    This Ruby on Rails bootcamp has a solid curriculum. It starts with the basics, HTML, CSS and moves on to JavaScript, JQuery and Ruby on Rails. Their instructors are patient and help you with problems without giving you the answer. They are invested in their students and really want you to succeed. They push the importance of getting out in your community with volunteering, meet-ups etc. Overall, I would say Learn was a good experience and helped me to level up in my coding career.

  • Anonymous
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

    I'm also glad that they got rid of the instructor because he wasn't the right person to be teaching coding to total beginners. He was impatient and demeaning to those that needed support that most. Isn't the point of attending bootcamp in person is to have hands-on experience and get support when needed?

    Overall, I had a good experience at LEARN and learnt some but it would be a mistake to assume to you'll come out prepared to be a developer from day one. Once you start your first job as a developer, you'll realize there's a huge of gap between what you need to know and what you learnt in short 12 (actually 8 weeks because of "1 week of professional development and 3 weeks of final project").

     

  • Anonymous • Student
    Overall Experience:
    Curriculum:
    Instructors:
    Job Assistance:

     

     

     

    I attended this bootcamp on a scholarship in which the entire tuition was waived. So first I wanted to express my gratitude for the people at LEARN for providing me that amazing opportunity. I probably would have not attended had it not been for this scholarship. I just wanted to preface my review with that so you understand the context of it since it might not contain the same kind of cost/benefit complaints that many other reviews contain.

    I think the great thing about this bootcamp is that it's run by a husband/wife team and that the wife is actually the CEO. I think that is quite inspiring for many women coming into this industry filled with sexism. She advocates for inclusion and has given talks on such topics in the community which I think is something different than other bootcamps. This place feels like a safe environment.

    My cohort was small and we all managed to bond very well with each other. This bootcamp was very adamant about not studying any new material once we left after 5pm. Though I definitely think that reviewing some material for a while when you go home by yourself is great to solidify the concepts. 

    This bootcamp labels itself as a Javascript/Rails focused bootcamp but that may be misleading. Of course when building web apps Javascript is going to be dabbled in much of the time so it never really goes away. But we don't necessarily focus on it too much. We spend about 2 weeks doing Javascript and we actually learn programming concepts through this language. I think this the time period during the course that I actually felt my mind being stretched. After this period, we move into Ruby but I felt like we should have spent more time in it. The curriculum didn't feel as challenging during the Ruby portion which was about a week.  When we moved into Rails I lost that 'stretchy' feeling and I didn't really feel like I was doing any 'programming' but merely managing this vast library that is Rails which is fine, but I felt like concepts were beginning to slip away from my mind.

    Now this kind of segues into why I titled my title the way I did. During the course we pair program everyday. We would have a standup sessoin in the morning where we talk about what we 'Mad, Sad, Glad, or scared' about and check-in. then we would have a presentation on a topic, and after that we would pair up and practice what we just learned. 

    In certain respects, pair programming is great because if you get stuck, your partner is there to provide an alternate perspective and you are able to keep moving fairly quickly. The thing in my mind that I felt like could have been improved and this is might be a  more a personal issue, is that you inevitably come to a point where your stuck and your partner may find a way to get unstuck for you but you might not understand how they came up with the solution they did. Asking questions and requesting them over and over to explain something to you sometimes isn't effective and isn't in the best interest of time. Some people work very fast, and some things click for them more readily whereas others learn differently. People going into bootcamps come from VASTLY different backgrounds, some may have had exposure to programming, some have math degrees, some have no exposure whatsoever. I found myself taking a backseat a lot and letting the other person drive because I just didn't think I was grasping things as quickly as they were. In this short time period, your going to have vastly different outcomes depending on the student. 

    This is where the time-based nature of the course comes to the forefront and I think is the biggest obstacle to truly learning concepts for some people. Keep in your mind that this is a BOOTCAMP, with all the implicatoins that that entails. You will be exposed to concepts and then PUSHED through the curriculum whether or not you understand them fully. There were times where I felt like I was just going through the motions and was completely lost but didn't feel like reaching out realy helped me out either. The TA's couldn't really provide the personal attention needed to truly help, they always seemed to be pre-occupied with other things, or perhaps they are just introverted. This is the problem with time-based education, or the factory model which bootcamps emulate from the traditional school system. You need to realy dig into these concepts that your learning and your going to need repetition, and when your only their for a few months, your inevitably going to feel pressure.

    What I wish was that they had more instructors who had experience in the industry. We had one head instructor who was very knowledgable but I don't think he knew how to relate to people too well despite having a degree in counseling. I perceived him as being impatient, elitist and authoritarian. He would frequently 'hush' or interrupt what they were saying to people when they would try to explain their disagreements, or get quite short with them when they weren't getting something as quickly as he wanted. This kind of behaviour doesn't encourage students to want to ask questions if they feel they are going to be attacked subtly by doing so. I'm not the only one who felt this. The TA's were helpful at times and not so much at other times, as they were also grads of the same bootcamp.   

    This bootcamp is also unique in that they provide a one month internship with a local company. These companies rotate every cohort. Some were looking to hire someone, some weren't. Some are paid, some are not. Some companies came and gave presentations and we would rank them. After the rankings the LEARN team then setup interviews based on wht we ranked, though not everyone gets what they want. Then after the interviews we would rank them again, and the companies would rank the the interviewees, and again LEARN would try to find the best fit.

    The companies are vastly different in size, ranging from startups without office space with 5 employees, to established companies. But I think on the whole the internship is valuable to providing real world experience that you can use on a resume'. There is also a group project during the last two weeks where we built out a complete web app from scratch utilizing the Agile process with daily scrum sessions. At the end of the two weeks we had a demo night to the local community. This experience was very valuable as well, as now we have an app that we can use in our portfolio.

     The bootcamp industry needs a lot of work and I don't know how much longer it's going to be around, but despite my criticisms, I am grateful for the exposure I received to a new field. I feel the large part of the value of being in a bootcamp is being dropped into the middle of a pre-existing network of people who are in the industry and who can help you navigate the waters of moving into a new industry. You can go to meetups with people from your cohort, find out about jobs through your network of peers, and for that the experience is valuable.

    Thanks to a presentation that the CEO Chelsea gave about finding your motivations. I was able to really clarify what motivated me to be in the tech industry. This clarification was something that definitely boosted my confidence and helped me figure out a way to present myself to people that I felt was true to what I am passionate about. I think that was one of the most helpful things during the course because there were times where I was questioning myself asking 'What am I doing here? '. I discovered and connected my passion for open source, with sustainable agriculture, social justice and worker co-ops. Now I have a clearer picture of where I want to go in the future. 

    Overall I am very grateful for my experience and I feel confident in the direction I need to go now in my learning.  

     

     

     

     

Thanks!