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Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps

Baltimore

Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps

Avg Rating:3.67 ( 3 reviews )

Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps offer a 24-week, part-time courses in web development and data analytics offered at the Johns Hopkins Baltimore campus. The full stack curriculum includes HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, Node.js, Database Theory, MongoDB, Heroku, Git, Java. Participants will learn the skills necessary to become front end and back end developers.

The data science curriculum includes programming in Excel, Python, JavaScript charting (D3.js, Leaflet.js), HTML/CSS, API interactions, SQL, Tableau, fundamental statistics, machine learning, and more. Enjoy close collaboration with other professionals while receiving hands-on experience.

Applicants do not need previous experience to enroll, but once admitted, all participants will complete a pre-course tutorial. Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps are part-time and designed for working professionals and participants who are actively pursuing a career change, advancement, or looking to gain a new skillset. 

Throughout the boot camps, participants have access to career-planning services, portfolio review, demo days, and high-impact career events. Participants will also have access to a tutor network, both inside and outside the classroom. Participants who complete the boot camp will receive a certificate of completion and will have a portfolio of projects demonstrating a working knowledge of web development or data analytics.

Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps are offered in collaboration with Trilogy Education Services, a 2U, Inc. brand.

Recent Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps Reviews: Rating 3.67

all (3) reviews for Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps →

Recent Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps News

    • Data Analytics - Part-Time

      Apply
      Start Date None scheduled
      Cost$10,971
      Class size25
      LocationBaltimore
      This course is rigorous, fast-paced, and focused on the practical technical skills needed to analyze and solve data problems. Gain proficiency in a broad array of technologies like Excel, Python, JavaScript, SQL databases, Tableau, and more. Applicants do not need experience to enroll, but once admitted, all learners will complete a pre-course tutorial. Throughout the course, you will complete projects using real data sets from the worlds of finance, healthcare, government, social welfare, and more—allowing you to build a strong portfolio with a professional demonstration of mastery.
      Financing
      DepositN/A
      Financing
      Payment plans available
      Getting in
      Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
      Prep WorkPre-work
      Placement TestNo
      InterviewYes
    • Full Stack Flex - Part-Time

      Apply
      MySQL, MongoDB, HTML, Git, JavaScript, jQuery, CSS, React.js, Node.js, Java
      In PersonPart Time10 Hours/week24 Weeks
      Start Date None scheduled
      Cost$10,995
      Class size25
      LocationBaltimore
      The Coding Boot Camp at Johns Hopkins Engineering is a 24-week, part-time web development course. The full stack curriculum includes HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, Express.js, React.js, databases, MongoDB, Node.js, MySQL, Command Line, Git, and more. Gain access to participate in experiential learning opportunities and receive career-planning services, portfolio reviews, and 1:1 coaching to position you for success in the field.
      Financing
      DepositN/A
      Financing
      Payment plans available
      Getting in
      Minimum Skill LevelBeginner
      Prep WorkPre-work
      Placement TestNo
      InterviewYes

    1 Scholarship

    • $500 The Coding Boot Camp at Johns Hopkins Engineering Scholarship

      The Coding Boot Camp at Johns Hopkins Engineering is a 24-week, full stack web development course. It is part-time and designed for working professionals and participants who are actively pursuing a career change or advancement or looking to gain a new skillset. The Course Report community is now eligible for a $500 scholarship to the Coding Boot Camp at Johns Hopkins Engineering.

      Eligibility

      Offer is only valid for new applicants. Applicants who have already submitted an application cannot claim this scholarship. & This scholarship cannot be combined with other offers.

      Qualifying Courses

      • Data Analytics - Part-Time (Baltimore)
      • Full Stack Flex - Part-Time (Baltimore)
    • Michael   User Photo
      Michael • Graduate Verified via GitHub
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      My experience as a student in the first cohort to complete the part time Full Stack Web Development Boot Camp at John Hopkins Engineering is as follows:
       
      1.Some background on me: I came into the bootcamp with virtually no experience in coding. I had some very limited knowledge of HTML and CSS. I completed the entire program and ended with an A average for all the assignments. At first, getting used to the process of writing code and understanding the syntax was one of the hardest things for me. The pre-work assignments helped out in this area, but I legit spent the first few weeks of the class saying in my head “how is anyone supposed to keep track of all these semi colons, colons, parentheses, and open and closed brackets.” If you are thinking about starting a program like this and you are also coming from a non-coding background, I would highly recommend getting acquainted with the concept of syntax before the beginning of the program. Even starting out with enough knowledge to refer to what I’m talking about as “syntax” is helpful. For the uninitiated, Syntax, by definition, is the set of rules, principles, and processes that govern the structure of sentences (or lines of code) in a given language (including programming languages) usually including word order and punctuation.  It gets much easier with practice, most things follow the same basic patterns, but starting out with some basic understanding will potentially save you from a world of headaches.
       
      2. Prepare to have some headaches. That is going to be part of doing business. One of my classmates said she had heard being a web developer described as being frustrated for a living. Developing a web page or an application will nearly always involve working though problems that don’t have one clear and obvious answer or necessarily a “right” way to do it. Keep an open mind. Learning the process to solve problems is really as important as learning the programming languages themselves. This is one of the biggest advantages of doing the bootcamp versus being a self-taught developer. You get to see that everyone else is going through similar experiences and if your code is not working it is not because the computer has something personal against you. 
       
      3. I choose to do this bootcamp because it was being offered at Johns Hopkins and my expectation was that this would mean I would be working together with talented and hardworking people. This was absolutely the case. Our instructor, Stetson, was great. He had very solid experience as a developer and he did an excellent job breaking down the information in the curriculum. There is a lot of information that gets presented in each lesson, but Stetson took the time to make sure the class never missed anything important. He would often live code on the projector and edit parts of the example projects in order to demonstrate different ways to solve problems. He patiently answered questions and worked hard to build student’s confidence. He set an excellent example of professionalism while also keeping the class fun. Our main TA Donald was also great. Donald really made himself available for questions in the classroom, during office hours, and on slack. He also came from a very strong background in computer science and development. He shared his passion for producing high quality work in the field. Donald also kept the class consistently entertained with his lively sense of humor. In addition to the instructor and the TA, our program also included a position called “student success manager”. This person doesn’t do any teaching, they are there to help each student understand how to take advantage of all the resource that are available through the bootcamp. Our student success manger, Gemini, was perhaps the unsung hero of our cohort. This was the part time class that met in the evening, so most people were coming directly to the campus after working a full-time job. I personally would leave my job and have just enough time to maybe drink a coffee while driving through rush hour traffic, fighting for parking near the campus, and then run up the hill to make it to the start of class on time. Low blood-sugar does not make for a good learning environment. Gemini constantly brought pizza and cookies for the entire class. This literally kept us alive on many occasions. Gemini also made sure everyone in the class knew about the extra tutor help that was available and encouraged people not to be too shy to ask for help. From the first day of class to the final presentation and now as alumni and industry professionals, anyone who listened to Gemini understood one of life’s valuable lessons, which is that help will always be given to those who ask. The staff delivered on the high expectations I had for this program. I can say the same thing about all the students in my cohort. I am very happy about both the professional connections and friendships I gained from this class. It’s been several months since the official end of the class and we still have an active slack channel where people help each other out with coding questions. The economy is still in general disarray due to the COVID-19 pandemic but I can certainly say I am in a better overall position having the skills and the experience from the bootcamp. 
       
      4. To improve the experience I would recommend having more than 1 TA for a class of our size. Stetson and Donald worked really hard to be available, but they can only be in one place at a time and in many cases even a small amount of one-on-one instruction made a big difference. I would also suggest modifying the curriculum slightly to get students hands in experience with the most in demand skills like React earlier in the program.  
    • Jordyn Saltzman • Contract Software Engineer • Student
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      I can't say enough positive things about my experience in this program. It required a ton of time and effort, more than I ever anticipated, and I think it could have been unbearable had it not been for our amazing instructors. They made the class relaxed, fun, and something I always looked forward to. Stetson and Donald always went out of their way to make themselves available for us both in and out of class. They treated us like equals and we did not have the typical teacher-student relationship. They were more like friends to us, which made class so much more enjoyable. I don't think either of them have had prior teaching experience and I was really impressed with their patience with all of us as we struggled to learn some really tough concepts. They explained things very clearly and worked with each of us individually to keep us on track. Thank you Stetson and Donald for an incredible experience and something that will jumpstart a whole new chapter for me. And thank you Gemini and everyone else who worked hard to make this a seamless process for all of us students. You guys care so much and it shows.
    • Ricardo Shaffer • Student
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      N/A
      I’ve broken down my review by: Pros, Cons, Ongoing problems, & Recommendation.  

      Pros:
      • the class was hosted in-person so it was easy to share code & work with fellow students.
      •  the instructor is very knowledgeable  & goes above and beyond to update the Trilogy materials and help students as much as humanly possible.

      Cons: it’s as if I paid to be a guinea pig & be told that they’re working out the kinks.  It’s a significant investment; I didn’t pay for them to fix their problems.  Also,  there is no material to review like nearly all learning environments; it’s just a bunch of code- nothing to read about why ‘x’ does this function, or even just the concept of it.  it seems like we’re paying to fix their broken code, whether we actually learn anything or not, so they can resell it as ‘updated’ code.  the class is taught by giving you a bunch of coding files that either work, are intentionally broken, or broken unintentionally.  the material seems as though they hired a bunch of programmers to make a bunch of files, then they approached universities & hand-selected from those files based on what the university thought the local demand.  Essentially, they’re recycling outdated files between all of the universities lending their name, relying on instructors & students to update & fix them so they can be recycled again.  But we’re paying to learn; not to spend so much time fixing files that we miss out on half of the material per section.

      Point by point:
      • the program seems to blame the instructor for the material being flawed. However, Trilogy/2U emphasizes they hire professionals actively working in the industry; they can’t be expected to resolve issues/ it’s as if a professor was told to use a textbook that was missing pages upon pages.
      • the class materials, a bunch of code, some with ‘read me’ files but most without, are full of errors.  The excuse was that it’s something we’re going to be required to do in the real world.  I know we’re supposed to learn troubleshooting but you can’t troubleshoot what you haven’t learned. 
      • Many hours of the class were & are spent figuring out what we’re trying to do since the materials were so hastily put together.
      • The program had prework that required installation of programs, however, we  tested it until the class discussed the content.  But issues surfaced requiring hours of troubleshooting instead of learning.
      • There are no materials to actually learn, like a typical class.  There are powerpoints, but they’re usually limited to a handful of slides for a whole topic, like Node.js; that use stock images without ever discussing the actual logic.
      • The class switched to online after COVID-19, but they claimed it was success without asking for our feedback. But there were & are significant issues with connections, communication, etc.  You’d learn more by buying a monthly subscription with an interface designed for online learning.
      • The contract outlines 250 contact hours of coding skills, (2) TAs, & (1) instructor.  You also can attend up to 4 times virtually, which seems to acknowledge that it’s not an ideal learning method.  Yet, the remainder of the class (4 months) is online & there’s only 1 TA.  Additionally, the website says that there are tutors, but they send you a contract saying the tutors are not included & may end at any time- which seems to go against their contract.


      Ongoing problems:

      Since it’s virtual & the code is not complete & virtually no reading materials, using a laptop to watch a shared-screen & type out the code is impossible.  Yet, the Student Success manager recommended I buy a monitor & create a fake Zoom account to use my phone & laptop to share files when I can, & to watch videos on the other.  Additionally, they attempted to blame the students for having issues with their code, suggesting the instructor may have issues, & blaming me for not using a tutor to learn concepts (hint: as part of the tutor contract, you have to ask SPECIFIC questions, share your code, & limit it to 50 minutes per week; not to ask conceptual questions).  


      Recommendation:

      I would avoid it unless they update their curriculum, provide more material, fulfill their contractual obligations, & stop blaming the instructors & students for their shortcomings. Furthermore, the program by Trilogy/2U claims to be leaders in online education but the class was set up first using free video conferencing apps, & free ‘Slack’ accounts; not an interface designed for online learning.  
      Response From: Boot Camp Team of Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps
      Title: Community Team
      Friday, May 29 2020
      Thank you for your review, Ricardo. We're glad to hear you enjoyed the in-person structure and benefited from our instructor's support, but regret to hear the boot camp as a whole did not live up to your expectations.

      Our course material is based on extensive market research, teaching in-demand skills that students can use to enter the current tech field. The curriculum is introduced at a higher level in-class and individuals are expected to continue building on that knowledge outside of class.

      As the curriculum progresses, we've found this methodology to be effective and witnessed individuals not only become increasingly confident in their newfound knowledge but also gain essential problem-solving and self-teaching skills: two essential qualities necessary in any real-world role. From your review, we understand that you did not feel this learning approach was sufficiently beneficial for you and we appreciate your feedback as we're constantly optimizing our curriculum and program offerings.

      Like you mentioned, your cohort did experience a disruption due to COVID-19 that resulted in your studies transitioning online for the health and safety of all participants. Johns Hopkins Engineering Boot Camps are offered in partnership with Trilogy Education Services. TES has been offering its programs online successfully for years, which allowed us to leverage existing technologies and processes to move our courses online efficiently. We are confident that our course can be delivered successfully through this online format, but we understand that this unplanned change did require some initial adjustments and we apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

      It's our goal for all participants to complete the program feeling equipped for success, so we would welcome the opportunity to speak with you and determine what additional assistance we can provide for you at this time. If you would like, please reach out to us directly at (443) 885-0012.