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An anomaly to some, an enigma to many, the remote software engineer is a very real thing. Perhaps you’ve already considered that after a coding bootcamp, all you need is your laptop and decent wifi to be a productive software developer... from anywhere. Whether you wish to work from exotic locations, or simply work from home, becoming a remote developer helps you design the lifestyle you want. With modern communication tools, cloud-based file sharing and the global demand for software engineers – coding bootcamp grads truly have the world at their fingertips. But before you sell all your belongings and buy a one-way ticket to [insert dream location], read on for important considerations and tips from CodingNomads on finding remote work after a coding bootcamp.

You’ll learn about:


Outpost coworking space backyard in Ubud, Bali - an unofficial conference call spot.

First - is working remotely for you?

As a coding bootcamp grad, you are still at the beginning of your learning curve. Some people benefit from an in-person environment with face-to-face interaction. That said, having amazing mentors and a supportive team isn’t dependent on going into an office, and many people work and learn better on their own terms. Here are some crucial characteristics of a successful remote developer:

Remote employee vs. freelancer

Do you prefer the stability of a paycheck? Or do you seek the variety of contract work?

Sometimes coding bootcamp grads need to start as contractors before landing a full-time job— especially if you want to work remotely. Starting as a contractor can be a great way to get your foot in the door, build your experience, and/or achieve the lifestyle you seek. Considerations for working as an employee vs. contractor:

Tips for Finding Remote Work

Now that you’ve decided to ditch the cubicle, it’s time to find a remote job. The following tips are tried-and-true strategies from fellow digital nomads and our coding bootcamp graduates.

1. Work for less, gain more

We know you didn’t go to a coding bootcamp to make less money, but hear us out. Small companies and startups need software engineers, but can’t always afford a senior developer. You need to gain experience and want the flexibility of remote work. Make it a win-win by starting at an affordable rate, while you continue learning, building experience, and creating your ideal lifestyle.

2. Reach out to your network

Looking for remote work is an endless abyss of possibilities. Reaching out to your family, friends, and professional contacts is the easiest and most effective way to find work. Your software engineering skills are in high demand, so it’s very likely that someone in your extended network could use the help. Remember Tip #1. You’re not putting anyone out. You’re potentially doing them a favor.

Write up a quick message that outlines your motivations, skills, and the type of remote position you seek. Send it to your contacts, and ask them to pass it along too. Demonstrate that you have valuable skills to offer, and the eagerness to learn. You’ll have a much better chance getting an interview by means of someone who can vouch for you.

3. Resources to build your professional online networks

Your online networks are also a critical component to finding remote work. Online people are your people, and the sky’s the limit on how far your online network extends. This is also the best way for a remote company to vet who you are, and the value you bring to the table.

4. Prepare your collateral, prepare for the interview

Alongside building your network, you’ll need all the nuts-and-bolts items for landing your first job out of a coding bootcamp. This includes polishing your resume and cover letter, ensuring that you convey your technical skills, personality, and your value to the company in each.

Check out these additional tips on finding a job after a coding bootcamp, including how to seek companies you want to work for, customize your outreach, prepare for the technical interview, and succeed on the job.

5. And finally: online job boards

Building your network is the most effective way to secure remote work. Entry-level positions are often not advertised online. If they are, cold-applying to jobs makes you just another applicant in the pool.

However, there are tons of developer job listings, so online job boards are worth a mention. Below are a handful, and a Google search will reveal many more.

(Pro tip: If you see a company you like that’s hiring devs of any level, try to connect with dev employees on LinkedIn / AngelList. Ask if they’d be willing to chat with you about what it’s like to work there on the team. See if they’re looking for any entry-level devs.)

Why CodingNomads?

Many coding bootcamp students join CodingNomads to jumpstart their dream of becoming a digital nomad. While learning to code at coworking spaces in Bali, Thailand, Mexico, and around the world, our students meet and learn from real-life remote developers—as well as remote companies that are hiring.

By learning to code from the road, and surrounded by a cohort with the same goal, students can focus on learning fast. We get a real taste of life as a digital nomad—working hard, having fun, and experiencing the world.

Ready, set, where would you like to go?

Working remotely can be a great arrangement for the right people, offering the flexibility to spend more time at home, or wherever you choose. But remember that it’s still hard work. If after your coding bootcamp—or at any point in your career—you seek autonomy and are ready for the challenge, use these tips as guidance for a rewarding remote developer career.

Digital nomads: any more tried and true tips for coders new to the remote scene?
Bootcamp grads: any questions about working 
remotely?
Let us know in the comments!

About The Author

Kim image codingnomads

Kim is a cofounder of CodingNomads, which teaches international immersive coding bootcamps around the world. Kim curates the international travel experiences of CodingNomads’ courses, with 2017 bootcamps in Bali, Thailand, and Mexico. You can follow her global adventures on Facebook, Instagram and CodingNomads’ blog.

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