rithm-school-logo

Rithm School

San Francisco

Rithm School

Avg Rating:4.97 ( 40 reviews )

Recent Rithm School Reviews: Rating 4.97

all (40) reviews for Rithm School →

Recent Rithm School News

Read all (6) articles about Rithm School →
  • Full-Time Web Development

    Apply
    Python, JavaScript, SQL, React.js, Front End
    In PersonFull Time45 Hours/week11 Weeks
    Start Date
    None scheduled
    Cost
    $24,000
    Class size
    12
    Location
    San Francisco
    Financing
    Deposit
    $3,000
    Financing
    Skills Fund
    Tuition Plans
    1-3 year plans offered
    Scholarship
    Rithm awards scholarships of up to $12,000 to support diversity and strong merit.
    Getting in
    Minimum Skill Level
    N/A
    Placement Test
    No
    Interview
    Yes

Review Guidelines

  • Only Applicants, Students, and Graduates are permitted to leave reviews on Course Report.
  • Post clear, valuable, and honest information that will be useful and informative to future coding bootcampers. Think about what your bootcamp excelled at and what might have been better.
  • Be nice to others; don't attack others.
  • Use good grammar and check your spelling.
  • Don't post reviews on behalf of other students or impersonate any person, or falsely state or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity.
  • Don't spam or post fake reviews intended to boost or lower ratings.
  • Don't post or link to content that is sexually explicit.
  • Don't post or link to content that is abusive or hateful or threatens or harasses others.
  • Please do not submit duplicate or multiple reviews. These will be deleted. Email moderators to revise a review or click the link in the email you receive when submitting a review.
  • Please note that we reserve the right to review and remove commentary that violates our policies.
You must log in to submit a review.

Click here to log in or sign up and continue.

Hey there! As of 11/1/16 is now Hack Reactor. If you graduated from prior to October 2016, Please leave your review for . Otherwise, please leave your review for Hack Reactor.

Title
Description
Rating
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
School Details
About You

Non-anonymous, verified reviews are always more valuable (and trustworthy) to future bootcampers. Anonymous reviews will be shown to readers last.

You must log in to submit a review.

Click here to log in or sign up and continue.


Katie Gray  User Photo
Katie Gray • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Zac Bennett  User Photo
Zac Bennett • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Hinesh   User Photo
Hinesh • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Emman Mascariñas  User Photo
Emman Mascariñas • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Juan Areces  User Photo
Juan Areces • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Kristen Lingwood  User Photo
Kristen Lingwood • software engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Karl  User Photo
Karl • Mobile Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Kelson Warner  User Photo
Kelson Warner • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Worth.
9/16/2018
Yang Yu  User Photo
Yang Yu • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Rich Berberian  User Photo
Rich Berberian • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Daniel S.  User Photo
Daniel S. • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Darien  User Photo
Darien • Software Engineer Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Vivian  User Photo
Vivian • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
N/A
Shriya Nevatia  User Photo
Shriya Nevatia • UX Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Andrew Mundy  User Photo
Andrew Mundy • Product Designer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Aaron  User Photo
Aaron • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Ferris • Student
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Sarah K • Software Engineer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Peter Farr • Backend Engineer • Student
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Andrew Pungprakearti • Front End Developer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Zejian Shen • Software Engineer • Student
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Life Changing
5/30/2018
Stephen • Software Engineer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Adele • Front-end Web Developer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Allie • Software Engineer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
Brian Harris • Full Stack Web Developer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:

Our latest on Rithm School

  • How Hinesh Landed a Job at Google after Rithm School

    Imogen Crispe5/1/2019

    After college, Hinesh found himself in a technical support role, and discovered a passion for software development. He decided to pursue programming full time and attended Rithm School coding bootcamp in San Francisco on a friend’s recommendation. After 16 weeks of bootcamp study, a real-world project with Course Report, and two months of job seeking, Hinesh is “incredibly happy” to be a software engineer at Google! He explains his Google interview process, and how the skills he gained from Rithm School help him learn new technologies on the job!

    Q&A

    What’s your background and how did you end up at Rithm School?

    I hadn’t planned to go into software engineering. For a long time, I actually wanted to be a doctor. I liked engineering, and competed in math competitions in high school. I combined my interests and studied biomedical engineering, with a plan to go on to medical school.

    During my gap year between college and medical school, I worked as a Technical Services Analyst at Epic Systems, a medical software company, helping clients troubleshoot their issues and doing a few small development projects. After that year, I decided to stay in software instead of going to medical school. It was a tough choice, but I think it was the right one.

    I worked at Epic Systems for another two years and loved the software development part of my job. I started weighing my options – do I go back to school, do I take a bootcamp (which I had heard about from a friend), or do I teach myself how to code? I decided a bootcamp was the way to go to become a software engineer so I picked Rithm School.

    Why did you pick Rithm’s coding bootcamp specifically? Did you consider other options?

    Yes, the biggest coding bootcamps that kept popping up were Hack Reactor and App Academy, and I interviewed for both. Some of the bootcamp interviews required some Javascript skills, which I’d never coded in before, so I did Hack Reactor’s free prep course to give myself a boost. Then I heard a friend had attended Rithm. She praised the bootcamp curriculum, the small class sizes, and the knowledgeable instructors who help out whenever needed. That type of learning environment sounded like my style. At my Rithm interview, I spoke with one of the founders who also ended up being my instructor. The interview was incredible. I learned a lot that day, and just based on the way he was teaching I knew it was the right place for me.

    The curriculum was also a factor in my decision making. Javascript is huge right now, a lot of companies want people with those skills, so I wanted to learn Full Stack Javascript. Rithm also teaches Python for backend and I figured I could learn more in-demand languages and frameworks like React and Node as well. The technologies they were teaching were very relevant to what people are asking for today.

    How did you pay for your bootcamp?

    During my time at Epic Systems, I saved up a pretty substantial amount of money so I was able to pay for Rithm using my savings.

    What was the Rithm application and interview process like?

    The application involved filling out a form with information about myself and my background, followed by a technical interview with one of the founders. A lot of my classmates went to the campus to do the interview on a whiteboard, but since I was located in Madison, WI, and Rithm is in San Francisco, I did mine over video call. We did a code share, where the interviewer posted a problem in a code share document, and I talked about my process, how I would solve the problem, and then wrote up a solution. During the interview itself, they taught me ways to improve my code – it was neat to get that feedback at that stage. After the interview, I got an offer to join Rithm School.

    Who were the other students in your bootcamp cohort?

    My cohort was about 14 people. The small size was great because we all got to know each other. The ages ranged from recent college grads to people in their late 30s with a couple of kids. Our cohort only had one woman, but I think that was atypical because other Rithm cohorts were 50% women. We came from all sorts of backgrounds – some people had worked in finance, one person was a project manager, there were two teachers, and one person had worked at Dreamworks as a visual effects artist. Some people had STEM education and some didn’t. During group projects and pair programming, we heard different opinions and ideas from people with different backgrounds.

    Describe the learning experience at Rithm – what was a typical day like?

    Rithm took a lot of care in developing the curriculum. For the first few weeks, we would have a morning lecture with slides to go over a new concept and then we’d go to the lab for paired programming exercises to reinforce the concepts. After lunch, we’d have another lecture and more reinforcement exercises.

    It also varied from week to week. During the React module, we had to learn all the basics in the mornings and afternoons, with smaller exercises to get the foundations. Eventually, we worked up to a morning lecture, followed by partnering up to build a full scale application over three days, to reinforce everything we’d learned in that framework up to that point.

    We had two main instructors, had access to the two instructors in the other class, and a recent grad served as a lab TA. The instruction quality was great and they were all very experienced. One instructor had been coding for 20 years and had tons of industry experience. During lab, the instructors were available for questions and provided feedback on your progress, what you could improve, and other tactics you could consider. They also did code reviews, sharing best practices and industry standards to improve your code and make it more efficient and readable.

    What was your favorite coding project at Rithm?

    We built a mock application from the ground up called Jobly where you can search for companies and apply to job postings. We built the backend API during our Node Express module and during the following React module, we built the front end that worked with the API. We got to build the entire application from front end to back end to databases. We also did complex things like full user authentication authorization flows – the complexity and scope of the project was significant, so I really enjoyed it.

    Tell us about your final project with us at Course Report! What was it like to work on a real-world project?

    Rithm’s unique real-world project experience requirement was another reason I was drawn to the bootcamp. There were six of us on the Course Report team and one of the biggest projects was building a minimum viable product (MVP) for a mobile app – it was awesome to build something from scratch. It was difficult to jump into a new backend (Rails), but with the help of instructors, we were able to search through our code on a larger scale than we originally had for our mock apps. We had to figure out how everything interacts, the changes you need to make, and the challenges due to the scale. We worked with a lot of new technologies and had the freedom to do what we wanted. We had never worked in React Native or built a mobile application, and we had an opportunity to work with Redis, a new database for us.

    After Rithm, that real-world project was a big part of my job search. Being able to talk about my real-world experience was something employers wanted to see.

    How else did Rithm prepare you for the job hunt?

    After that project, we had the final 3 weeks of the Rithm curriculum called Outcomes. The instructors lectured us on job hunt strategies like doing reverse recruiting, applying effectively for jobs, how to phrase emails, different ways of applying, and referrals. On top of that, we had a week of data structures and algorithms practice to prepare us with computer science skills to use in technical interviews where we would need to write algorithms out on a whiteboard.

    We also had support after we graduated. On Fridays, Rithm holds office hours for alumni where you can ask any question on the job search. Job searches can be emotionally difficult so it was great to be able to go back to Rithm and be with the other people from the cohort who were all in the same boat. The instructors were also there to help. It was the support I needed after I graduated and it would have been more difficult if I had completely lost touch with Rithm.

    Congrats on landing a job at Google! How did that come about and what was the interview process like?

    Google’s interview process is pretty difficult – I was able to get a referral from someone I know but I also needed to send in an application. I went through a lot of interviews including a phone screening and an on-site interview with a few different technical problems to solve – they based your hiring on your ability to problem solve, and had more emphasis on the data structures and algorithms versus some other companies. It was a lot of white boarding!

    I was definitely hoping for a job at a company like Google, but my main goal was just to get a job in software development and then figure out exactly what I wanted to do from there. Software development is so broad, you don’t necessarily know where you want to start, but once you start working, you’ll figure out what aspects you really like after you break into the industry. I got lucky because working at Google has been my dream job and I’m incredibly happy to be here. It was what I was shooting and hoping for, not knowing how much of a longshot it was, but here I am!

    What’s your role and are you using the programming languages you learned at Rithm?

    I just started recently and I’ll primarily be working on Google Search. As a front end developer, I’m using Javascript and I’ll be learning a few new things – I can’t talk about the exact frameworks we use, but Rithm gave me the frameworks foundation that can be applied to other technologies I encounter. Once you know your first few languages and frameworks, it’s not difficult to pick up others.

    How has your background as a Technical Services Analyst helped you in your new career path?

    It didn’t necessarily help me with software development, but it helps me work with clients and other people. I think my communication skills and working with others to solve problems has improved because of that role. I’ve also benefited from my problem solving and critical thinking skills, because I had to look into problems clients reported, which carries over to solving problems with software development. I’ve always naturally been a problem solver and I enjoy it a lot.

    What’s been your biggest challenge or roadblock in becoming a software developer?

    Rithm was great, but after the bootcamp the job hunt was the hardest part for me. It took a few weeks for me to get some traction and two months to get an actual offer – a lot of jobs are looking for people with more experience, so it was a bit frustrating at times when you’re starting into a new career. I’m glad that Google is open to diversity – they looked past the fact that I don’t have a CS degree, saw my potential in developing software, and gave me a chance.

    How are you staying involved in Rithm School and the other grads?

    A lot of us play in a soccer league, so I see my classmates every Saturday. Rithm also hosts alumni happy hours to catch up with each other and the school. It’s great to stay in touch with them even after you’re done with the bootcamp.

    What advice do you have for others who are considering a career change with a bootcamp like Rithm?

    If you’re unhappy with what you’re doing and are thinking of software development, definitely dip your toe into it. I did the Hack Reactor prep course – do a few small coding projects to ensure you’re interested in it. If you find you like it, it’s definitely possible! A lot of people are able to make this switch because tech is so big. Bootcamps are great options for making the change quickly and it was definitely one of the best decisions I’ve ever made – just go for it!

    Read Rithm School reviews on Course Report and visit the Rithm website for more information.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/1586/s300/imogen-crispe-headshot.jpg-logo

    Imogen is a writer and content producer who loves writing about technology and education. Her background is in journalism, writing for newspapers and news websites. She grew up in England, Dubai and New Zealand, and now lives in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Guide to Deferred Tuition and ISAs at Coding Bootcamps

    Imogen Crispe4/26/2019

    Just as they’ve developed disruptive education tools, technology bootcamps are also adopting payment plans which allow students to pay nothing or very little until they graduate and find a job. Deferred tuition and income sharing agreements (ISAs) are becoming more widely available, and give students who don’t have $20,000 in the bank, access to life-changing learning opportunities. This guide will help you sort through the details and differentiate between the terms; plus, we’ve even helped you start your research by compiling a list of coding and data science bootcamps that offer ISAs or Deferred Tuition.

    Continue Reading →
  • 14 Alternatives to Dev Bootcamp

    Imogen Crispe7/25/2017

    dev-bootcamp-alternatives-austin

    With the closing of Dev Bootcamp (slated for December 8, 2017), you’re probably wondering what other coding bootcamp options are out there. Dev Bootcamp changed thousands of lives, and built a great reputation with employers, so we are sad to see it go. Fortunately, there are still plenty of quality coding bootcamps in the cities where Dev Bootcamp operated. Here is a list of coding bootcamps with similar lengths, time commitments, and curriculums in the six cities where Dev Bootcamp had campuses: Austin, Chicago, New York, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle.

    Continue Reading →
  • Instructor Spotlight: Elie Schoppik of Rithm School

    Lauren Stewart3/27/2017

    rithm-school-instructor-spotlight-elie-schoppik

    Elie Schoppik is a self-taught developer, and after teaching at two coding bootcamps, he decided it was time to start his own. Along with two co-founders, Elie started Rithm School in San Francisco to provide smaller class sizes and a greater focus on the student experience. We chatted with Elie to learn about his software development teaching experience, the reasons for founding Rithm School, and his top tips for aspiring bootcampers.

    Q&A

    How did you get started in software development?

    I graduated from college in 2010 with a degree in finance and I knew nothing about programming. When I started an education company with a developer friend, I had to learn to code on the job in order to build our product. Teaching myself to code was really difficult, but I was lucky to have great mentors helping me through my learning process. I was surrounded by software engineers who guided me through the basics, and helped me learn how to write good code. That's one of the things I love the most about teaching students – it's very easy to just write code that works, but when you get into the real world, writing clean code is crucial. I try to instill in students the importance of writing good, clean code from the start.

    As a founder of Rithm, what motivated you to start your own coding bootcamp?

    My two co-founders, Tim Garcia, Matt Lane, and I all taught for about a year together at other coding bootcamps. We saw a lot of frustration with very large class sizes and a small number of instructors. As a teacher, it's really demoralizing to know that there are some students you just won't have the time to help. You know the student spent the time and money, and has made a commitment, but you're kind of powerless.

    When we started Rithm School, we wanted to focus exclusively on very small class sizes. So we keep our classes at 12. The goal is to have a constant process of checking in with students, pairing with students, working with students daily and always knowing how they're progressing. Our fundamental theory is that for-profit education does not scale. We want to provide each student with the same interviewers, instructors, curriculum, and level of support. We're going to be constantly iterating but provide the same product and same quality.

    As a self-taught developer, how do you feel about the “bootcamp” model? Did you have to be convinced of its efficacy?

    I think it's a phenomenal model in general. The idea of being able to change people's careers and lives over the course of such a short period of time is unbelievable. As long as students have the mental picture of how hard it's going to be and how much work it will take, I think there's some incredible progress that can be made in this space. If they have that mindset from day one, they’ll be successful.

    There are quite a lot of bootcamps in San Francisco – what makes Rithm School stand out?

    First and foremost, the small classes. We keep our student to teacher ratio at 4:1, maximum. Tim, Matt, and I have experience as coding bootcamp instructors and have been teaching for over three years. Tim has a master's degree in computer science, Matt has a PhD in math, and I have teaching and industry experience, so we all bring unique perspectives to Rithm School.

    We are striving to open source all of our curriculum. We have about 45% of our current curriculum available for free at rithmschool.com/courses. And at Rithm, by the time you start working with us, you have already taken advantage of some of our free online courses. Our goal is to be as transparent and honest as possible about the education that people are going to get. We focus on the student's experience, and we’re not trying to rapidly scale at this point. We want to keep our classes small, build a really good business, and provide the right kind of educational materials.

    Is Rithm School working with the BPPE (Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education) in California?

    Absolutely. When we first started Rithm, working with the BPPE was actually one of the most important things. We've submitted our application, and we're in the process of being approved. We actually need one year of audited financial statements, so once we’ve been operating for a year, we can submit the final application. Even though there’s a lot of bureaucracy, there's also so much value in transparency in coding bootcamps. We've seen coding bootcamps get shut down, so we respect the BPPE and what they’re doing.

    Rithm School is now teaching your second student cohort. What did you learn from your first cohort?

    We're always iterating on the curriculum. Our first cohort had two students and our current cohort of eight students is now working on company projects. Through our past teaching, we’ve seen what technologies are most useful for teaching and valuable to the job search. At General Assembly, I was teaching Node, Rails, and Angular – that has evolved at Rithm School to teaching Python, React and Node. 

    We've really honed in on teaching languages like Python, which are wonderful for beginners and valuable for all kinds of industries, as well as more popular JavaScript libraries like React. For every cohort we have to rewrite parts of our curriculum because libraries like React Router change and release new versions. One of the wonderful things about teaching JavaScript is that our curriculum will always need iteration and that ecosystem is just so fascinating.

    What have you learned about your own teaching style over the past three years? What can students expect in the classroom?

    I try not to lecture with slides too much. Instead, I lecture in small intervals, then give students the opportunity to code. That’s the reason our classes start at 9am and end at 6pm. If you're coding all day, then you can’t do much past 6pm.

    As I’ve grown as a teacher, I’ve introduced more pair programming. Our instructors actually sit behind students and pair program with them all day. Since we have a small class size, we can divide our students into three groups of four. And between each instructor, we can sit behind those groups and just watch them code all day. With pair programming, we see students’ learning accelerate so much more than in traditional lectures where students move more slowly and get bored more easily.

    Since our curriculum is online and available to all students, we encourage students to read ahead to the next section and practice a couple of exercises. Then the following day we flip the classroom and work on projects most of the day.

    After working with so many bootcamp students, can you tell us what makes the ideal bootcamper?

    Before you enroll in a bootcamp, one of the most important things is to understand the commitment. Reading about programmers, having friends who are programmers, hearing how exciting it is, and learning about the salary potential can be wonderful. But that’s not the point. Some people really don't realize the intensity of a bootcamp until they’ve spent the time and the money, which is dangerous. It’s important that students understand what they're getting into, and that's why we have our curriculum online. You can chat with us on the site as you're working through the material, and the goal is to be really personable. I advise students to be very honest about what you're getting yourself into.

    The best students have done the research and have tried coding. People who have STEM backgrounds will naturally pick this stuff up faster because they have previous exposure. But other students have been Lyft drivers, massage therapists – we've seen students from all walks of life be successful. It's really about the student’s ability to problem solve and to be intellectually honest and transparent about how you best learn.

    What types of jobs are you expecting your students to be prepared for when they graduate?

    We encourage our students not to have an assumption about their first job after a bootcamp. Some students graduate and are really excited to take an internship at a larger company, while other students want to start their own companies. We also have students who are interested in working in nonprofits. We don't mandate that students work with any specific company.  

    After 13 weeks of our program, we connect students to four weeks of intensive data structure algorithms and behavioral interview prep with a company called Outco, with whom we’ve partnered to help with this prep. The focus is to make sure students are ready for the job search – it’s a very different skill than learning to program.

    Rithm School recently raised money from a venture firm called Slow Ventures with the intent of sending our grads to their portfolio companies. We expect to graduate about 60 students this year, and we have about 120 portfolio companies with Slow Ventures, plus the entire Outco network. So we have a lot of hiring companies to work with our students. We're focusing on figuring out students’ goals after class and tailoring our curriculum and projects to those goals. We respect that some students don't want to work at big tech companies.

    How do you assess student progress throughout the bootcamp?

    Since students are coding most of the day, towards the end of the day students will submit a pull request, push their code up to GitHub, and we review it. Having such a small class of students means that we can do pretty thorough code reviews on a regular basis. We also do more formal assessments every second or third week.

    A differentiator of Rithm School is that if we find students are falling behind or we've made a mistake in the admissions process, we encourage students to apply for future cohorts, but they receive a full tuition refund. If we did something incorrectly, we should not punish them for that. They’ve made the time commitment, and we will do our best to make it work with students. At other bootcamps we saw a lack of guidance past a certain point. Rithm School is doing it differently; we really focus on the student experience. In the first six weeks, if it's not working out, we go our separate ways. If students complete our program and don't find a job in six months, then we do the same thing – students receive a full tuition refund.  

    For our readers who are beginners, what resources or meetups do you recommend if they're thinking about a coding bootcamp?

    As I mentioned, Rithm School has released some free online content which is similar to Codecademy, but we offer a live chat when you need help. We talk to people from all over the world going through our curriculum. We get awesome feedback from the community – it's like we’re all learning together. We have quite a few free online courses for JavaScript fundamentals. Our JavaScript e-course is about 130 hours, so when you’re ready to learn fundamentals for bootcamp, it's a wonderful resource.

    If you prefer books, Eloquent JavaScript is wonderful but gets very difficult quickly. Kyle Simpson’s You Don't Know JS is another fantastic resource that gives a dive deep into the internals of the language. If you really want to understand the “why” behind things, that's a phenomenal series and available for free online.

    Do you have any other tips or suggestions for aspiring bootcampers?

    Make sure you get the answers you need and meet the people you'll be working with on a daily basis as early as possible before you invest time and money. If you get an opportunity, it’s essential to know who's going to be teaching you and potentially work with that person before you make that commitment. In Rithm School’s interview process, the first phone call is with me, then you’ll speak with my co-founders and our Director of Operations.

    The more you can learn on your own, the better, but there is a certain point where you’ll hit that ceiling, and you’ll need to accelerate your learning by attending a bootcamp. When Rithm School published our online courses, a lot of people questioned why we would give away our curriculum. Our response is that if you can't afford our school, or you're not able to come to the San Francisco area, who are we to stop you from learning with us? After that, if you want to accelerate your learning, and skyrocket your growth as a developer, we'll be here to help you do that.

    Read Rithm School Reviews on Course Report and learn more about their program.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/4484/s300/lauren-stewart-headshot.jpg-logo

    Lauren is a communications and operations strategist who loves to help others find their idea of success. She is passionate about techonology education, career development, startups, and the arts. Her background includes career/youth development, public affairs, and philanthropy. She is from Richmond, VA and now currently resides in Los Angeles, CA.

  • September 2016 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe1/18/2018

    Welcome to the September 2016 Course Report monthly coding bootcamp news roundup! Each month, we look at all the happenings from the coding bootcamp world from new bootcamps to big fundraising announcements, to interesting trends. Of course, we cover our 2016 Outcomes and Demographics Report (we spent a ton of time on this one and hope everyone gets a chance to read it)! Other trends include growth of the industry, increasing diversity in tech through bootcamps, plus news about successful bootcamp alumni, and new schools and campuses. Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast!

    Continue Reading →
  • Coding Bootcamp Cost Comparison: Full Stack Immersives

    Imogen Crispe4/1/2019

    How much do coding bootcamps cost? From students looking for free coding bootcamps to those wondering if an $18,000 bootcamp is worth it, we understand that cost is important to future bootcampers! While the average full-time programming bootcamp in the US costs $11,906, bootcamp tuition can range from $9,000 to $21,000, and some coding bootcamps have deferred tuition. So how do you decide what to budget for? Here, we break down the costs of coding bootcamps from around the USA

    This is a cost comparison of full stack (front end and back end) in-person (on-site) immersive bootcamps that are nine weeks or longer, and many of them also include extra remote pre-work study. We have chosen courses which we think are comparable in course content – they all teach HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, plus back end languages or frameworks such as Ruby on Rails, Python, Angular, and Node.js. All schools listed here have at least one campus in the USA. To find out more about each bootcamp or read reviews, click on the links below to see their detailed Course Report pages.

    Continue Reading →

Thanks!