Start the conversation with Lambda School.Start the conversation with Lambda School.Request Info >
lambda-school-logo

Lambda School

Online

Lambda School

Avg Rating:5.0 ( 29 reviews )

Recent Lambda School News

Read all (13) articles about Lambda School →

Recent Lambda School Reviews: Rating 5.0

all (29) reviews for Lambda School →

1 Campus

Online

921 Crescent Ct, San Ramon, CA 94582

A six-month full-time or one-year part-time online computer science course that’s free until you get a job making at least $50,000/year. During six months at the Lambda Academy of Computer Science, you will spend nearly as much time studying computing fundamentals and writing code as you would in most four-year programs. You'll not only be an excellent web development practitioner, but will have a deeper grounding in the fundamentals of computer science, including algorithms, data structures, operating systems, and more. In short, you'll learn the practical skills and modern languages required to become a software engineer, but also how to think abstractly and solve problems from first principles. We're so convinced you'll get a job after finishing our course that you can enroll and take the entire course for free. Once you get a job making at least $50,000/year, you’ll pay a percentage of your salary for two years. Check out our website for the details.

Course Details

Deposit
$0 down (No deposit, no down payment)
Payment Plan
17% income for 2 yrs
Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Basic JavaScript
Placement Test
Yes
Prep Work
Pre-course work is sent after acceptance to the program
Jul 16, '18 -Feb 8, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:July 12, 2018

Jul 16, '18 -Aug 2, '19
0

OnlinePart Time15Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:July 12, 2018

Aug 20, '18 -Apr 5, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:August 16, 2018

Sep 24, '18 -May 10, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:September 20, 2018

Oct 29, '18 -Jun 14, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:October 25, 2018

Dec 10, '18 -Jul 26, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:December 6, 2018

Jan 21, '19 -Aug 23, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:January 17, 2019

Apr 1, '19 -Nov 1, '19
0

OnlineFull Time45Hours/week40 Seats

Application Deadline:March 28, 2019

Machine Learning, Data ScienceOnlineFull Time45 Hours/week30 Seats

A six-month full-time or one-year part-time online machine learning and artificial intelligence course that’s free until you get a job making at least $50,000/year. During six months at the Lambda Academy of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence, you will spend nearly as much time studying computing fundamentals and writing code as you would in most four-year programs. You'll not only be an excellent machine learning, artificial intelligence, or data science practitioner, but will have a deeper grounding in the fundamentals of computer science, including algorithms, data structures, operating systems, and more. In short, you'll learn the practical skills and modern languages required to become a data scientist, but also how to think abstractly and solve problems from first principles. We're so convinced you'll get a job after finishing our course that you can enroll and take the entire course for free. Once you get a job making at least $50,000/year, you’ll pay a percentage of your salary for two years. Check out our website for the details. Our curriculum covers the following topics and more: - Statistics - Linear Algebra - Regression - Data Visualization - Principal Components Analysis - Neural Networks - Deep Learning - Computer Vision - Clustering & Search - Natural Language Processing - Data Collection - Data Science - TensorFlow - Amazon AI Services

Application Deadline:October 25, 2018

Course Details

Deposit
$0 down (No deposit, no down payment)
Payment Plan
17% salary for 2 yr
Interview
Yes
Minimum Skill Level
Basic Python and simple calculus
Placement Test
Yes
Prep Work
Pre-course work will be sent after acceptance to the program
Objective-C, Xcode, Swift, iOSOnlineFull Time40 Hours/week40 Seats

Swift, Objective C, and computer science

Application Deadline:July 5, 2018

Course Details

Deposit
$0 down (No deposit, no down payment)
Payment Plan
17% of income for 2 yrs after getting a job
Interview
Yes
Prep Work
We provide pre-course work lessons free of charge.

Review Guidelines

  • Only Applicants, Students, and Graduates are permitted to leave reviews on Course Report.
  • Post clear, valuable, and honest information that will be useful and informative to future coding bootcampers. Think about what your bootcamp excelled at and what might have been better.
  • Be nice to others; don't attack others.
  • Use good grammar and check your spelling.
  • Don't post reviews on behalf of other students or impersonate any person, or falsely state or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity.
  • Don't spam or post fake reviews intended to boost or lower ratings.
  • Don't post or link to content that is sexually explicit.
  • Don't post or link to content that is abusive or hateful or threatens or harasses others.
  • Please do not submit duplicate or multiple reviews. These will be deleted. Email moderators to revise a review or click the link in the email you receive when submitting a review.
  • Please note that we reserve the right to review and remove commentary that violates our policies.

Hey there! As of 11/1/16 is now Hack Reactor. If you graduated from prior to October 2016, Please leave your review for . Otherwise, please leave your review for Hack Reactor.

Title
Description
Rating
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
School Details
About You

Non-anonymous, verified reviews are always more valuable (and trustworthy) to future bootcampers. Anonymous reviews will be shown to readers last.

Please submit this review with a valid email

You must provide a valid email to submit your review. Your review will not appear on the live Course Report site until you confirm it.


5/30/2018
Dylan Scheidt • Lead React Developer • Graduate Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/23/2018
Jake Cooley • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/8/2018
Joram Clervius • Senior Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/7/2018
Lois Truby • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
N/A
5/4/2018
Tyler Sanford • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/4/2018
Antonio Melendez • Software Engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/4/2018
Rashmi Baheti • Student Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/21/2018
Adam Lower • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/16/2018
Sara • Project Manager • Student Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/16/2018
Chris A • Section Lead • Student Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/7/2018
Tyler Long • Software Developer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
2/10/2018
Travis Jones • Student Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
N/A
1/18/2018
Patrick Kennedy • Software engineer • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
1/18/2018
Ely Alamillo • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
4/21/2017
Harris • Data Scientist • Graduate Verified via LinkedIn
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/18/2017
Caz Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
N/A
3/17/2017
Robert Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
3/17/2017
Chan Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
N/A
3/17/2017
Abdullah Clute • Student Verified via GitHub
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/31/2018
Pat Collins • QA engineer (looking for react dev roles) • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/30/2018
Xiaoping Li • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/30/2018
Michael Dennis • Software Engineer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
5/3/2018
Mark Oliver • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
2/7/2018
Jiovan Melendez • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
1/29/2018
RonaldG • Full Stack Developer • Student
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
1/18/2018
Teri Wilkins • Senior Software Engineer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
8/11/2017
Angelia • Freelance Developer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
8/11/2017
Ethan Robinson • Web Developer
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:
7/20/2017
Boomer • Graduate
Overall Experience:
Curriculum:
Instructors:
Job Assistance:

Our latest on Lambda School

  • Lambda Labs: Final Projects That Prep Students for Jobs

    Imogen Crispe6/15/2018

    The skills you learn in the classroom aren’t everything you need to work in a real tech job. Realizing this, Lambda School has launched Lambda Labs, a month-long final team project that gives students the opportunity to work in teams and build functioning products from start to finish. How do students in the online bootcamp collaborate remotely? And are these Lambda Labs projects helping students through the job interview process? We check in with Lambda School Instructor Ryan Holdaway and recent Lambda School graduate Cassidy Avery to find out!

    Q&A

    What is Lambda Labs?

    Ryan: Lambda Labs is the final experience for our students. Our goal at Lambda School is to train students to join dev teams and be able to contribute right away. We found that there was a gap between the kind of learning that takes place in a classroom and the kind of work that's done on the job. So we wanted to make that transition smoother and arm students with some of the practical skills they would need in their jobs.

    Before Lambda Labs, students were split into teams for their final projects and could brainstorm and pick their own project ideas. A lot of times, those projects ended up being loosely defined, too ambitious, incomplete, or not practical to show to a potential employer. We felt like that was a pretty weak final experience for Lambda School students before we sent them out into the job market.

    With Lambda Labs, we plan final projects in advance for students. We sometimes work with outside companies for that, or plan internal projects. The goal is for students to work on something that's useful from start to finish, professional and complete, and deployed to production on the internet. Our idea for Lambda Labs is to simulate a dev shop.

    Is Lambda Labs offered with all the Lambda School majors – Web Development, iOS, and Machine Learning?

    Ryan: Yes, it will be offered for all of the majors. We'll adapt it to each of the programs – web, iOS and machine learning. Students will work on practical, real-world projects that mimic a real job. Our long-term goal is to have students across different programs work together. For example, an iOS class and a web development class could work together where the web students write a back end system and the API, and the mobile students build a mobile client.

    How does Lambda Labs fit into the overall curriculum?

    Ryan: For the last month of Lambda School’s six-month program, students work on projects in teams of three or four, along with a project manager under the supervision of a professional developer. The project manager will lead students in daily stand up meetings where they'll discuss what each student was working on yesterday, what they accomplished, what they're going to be working on today, and any blockers that the team needs to resolve.

    Students pick their own tools as far as technology stack and toolchain, and what to use for the database, back end and front end system. Teams follow a Kanban style project management system with tickets on a ticketboard that they progress through, including things in progress, things in testing, and things that are done and shipped. They'll have a Trello board with tickets and wireframes in the design document for what the project should look like, and they build it to specification.

    We feel like that's really good practice for students going into their first jobs. When software developers start a new job, one of the first things they often do is build a project that somebody else dreamed up. We wanted to zero in on the skills needed for the job we were training students for.

    What sort of projects will students work on? You mentioned company projects and internal projects.

    Ryan: We have worked with a couple of organizations that gave out students projects. We have one month to work on a project, so if we find an outside project that fits within that scope, then we're happy to work with outside companies.

    For our most recent cohort, we partnered with an organization that plans concerts and music events in Austin, Texas. They needed a platform to connect performers, venue owners, sponsors, and other vendors. A couple of Lambda School students build that over the last month.

    If students don't have an external project to work on, they work on something planned by a member of the Lambda School team –  a project that can be completed start to finish in one month. Ideas come from students, instructors, friends, and family. If students have ideas, we can work together to plan the project ahead of time so that preparation is done before the students start work. It's really important that they have work to do on the first day and are not wasting time planning a project and making product decisions.

    For example, Cassidy's team built a standalone SaaS product that's a bingo card generator where people can create custom bingo cards for a specific event. It's a party game. Users can input different choices for their event, shuffle all the squares, and print out a bunch of cards. It was a fun project that students worked on for about a month, and delivered a nice, functioning, SaaS project.

    Cassidy, can you tell us about your background and why you decided to enroll at Lambda School?

    Cassidy: I am a pure career changer. Previously, my career was a bit all over the place. I started out doing software integration for a hospital as part of the medical records team. That experience initially sparked my first thoughts that I should be doing something more technical, because solving problems and making things work is really satisfying. I also did a lot of customer service management.

    I started teaching myself to code about a year and a half ago. People said to me, "You're a very analytical person, you should really try coding, you'd really like it." I was teaching myself Python and JavaScript, and I was really falling in love with it.

    What made you choose Lambda School over another coding bootcamp?

    Cassidy: Finding a good fit in a coding bootcamp was a little difficult. A lot of bootcamps require a lot of money up front, or they need you to move to another city. For me and my family, that was not something that we could do.

    I heard about Lambda School in Spring of 2017. They were pretty new and small, but their goal was to align the school's needs to the students’ needs, and it was completely remote so you could do it from anywhere. They also don’t charge any tuition up front; instead you start paying once you get a job, which is really helpful to people that don't have the funding.

    Lambda School is also an excellent school. They've been trying really hard to bring in some of the best and brightest instructors from top companies like Google, Apple, and NASA, who have worked in the field and have really impressive resumes. In addition to teaching us, they can also mentor us and tell us what to expect when we’re looking for a job. I thought their team was really impressive, so I jumped in.

    What was the learning experience at Lambda School like? Can you tell me about a typical day before you started Lambda Labs?

    Cassidy: It really is like drinking from the firehose – there is so much material. Lambda teaches you everything. I'm a full stack developer now, but before Lambda School, I could do a basic HTML, CSS web page, a single static web page with a little bit of JavaScript, and a little Python. Now I can build a full application with a front end, back end, a database, everything.

    We spent about eight hours a day, hands-on coding. During our lectures, we were coding along while we listened, and we had sprints where we would also code along. Then we would have small projects to complete, either independently or paired. At the end of the week, we would have individual projects to reinforce what we had learned that week. It was a lot, but it was really good. We had many opportunities to reinforce what we were learning.

    Tell me about your experience working on your Lambda Labs project. What was your role and what sort of team were you working with?

    Cassidy: I worked on a three-person team with a project manager who was a Lambda School employee. Just like in a real dev team, we had someone who would check our project every day, we did stand ups every morning, and we would check in with each other.

    I did the full React + Redux build of the front end. I also started the database, got it to a bare-bones skeleton stage, then one of my teammates took it over and hooked it up to the other parts of the app. Our third teammate actually built the bingo card generator, and used a PDFMake at the end.

    We all had our own little parts, but regularly throughout the day, we were checking in with each other and saying, "Anyone need any help?" Even though we were working from all over the country, we could still communicate at any time via Slack, so all my team members were available at my fingertips. If one of us was stumped about something, or wanted feedback about an aspect of the project, it was so quick to hop on a Zoom call and have a quick chat.

    How much help did your team need from Lambda School staff?

    Cassidy: For the most part, we were using the knowledge we already had to build the project, or doing a lot of research, which is what you would do in the real world. For example, our third teammate was doing a lot of research, and trial and error learning, to use PDFMake, to make it work appropriately and correctly with our project.

    Just like in the real world, you don't know everything. It's impossible to know everything because the field is growing and changing all the time. We did what we knew, we learned what we had to learn on the fly, and if we got really stumped, we could always go to our project manager, and he might be able to guide us or point us in the right direction. 

    Did you learn new technologies or skills during Lambda Labs, outside of the regular curriculum?

    Cassidy: The biggest skill we learned was how to work on a developer team. This was the first time we had worked on a project where we had different personalities coming together, making decisions together, and building things that would work together. We really learned to work with other developers in a different way.

    It was really helpful to have a project that was basically given to us by a “client” that had goals, a structure, and a clear idea of what we needed to work towards. We didn't have to hit our heads together about what we were going to build, but we still came together to make decisions on how to build it. Lambda Labs was definitely different than working on projects on our own and I'm absolutely glad that we had the experience.

    What was the outcome of your Lambda Labs project? Is it finished? Were you able to deploy it?

    Cassidy: Absolutely. It’s hosted on Heroku. It's a functioning product. It's bangarangbingo.com.

    That's awesome! And what are your plans now? How is your job search going so far?

    Cassidy: I'm based in Charlotte, North Carolina right now. I've applied to a few jobs here, and to a few remote jobs, and I'm starting to expand up the Eastern Seaboard a little bit. I've had some interviews and nothing's really panned out yet, but it's been a really good interviewing experience so far. I am actively looking, and hopefully, I'll land that first job soon.

    I’m looking for a role where I can use these new skills. I really like being able to do a little bit of everything on a project. So I am basically trying to find something that will give me more of that full stack experience and a chance to learn more on the job.

    How did the Lambda Labs project prepare you for interviewing?

    Cassidy: As Ryan mentioned, we used a Kanban board for planning our project. Now that I'm interviewing, I’m realizing that a lot of the companies are using the exact same sort of workflow that we used in our Lambda Labs project – Slack, Zoom, Kanban, and Trello or something similar. 

    On top of those tools, it's great to show off a fully-realized, well-executed project that was built and deployed by our team in 22 days. Now we can all say, "We have these skills just like a normal engineer out in the field, we know how to work together, we know how to follow the lead of a project manager, we know how to use the same sorts of tools that are used in the field to manage projects, and we understand how to build these sorts of projects." I think it's really important to be able to show that we know what we're doing.

    As well as having that project to show employers, how else is Lambda school helping you with your job search?

    Cassidy: They have a dedicated Career Services team, who are awesome. During the last month and a half of the program, we had mini "brown bag sessions" every other week to discuss everything from how to structure your resume and how to use LinkedIn, to how to focus your job search. We also did mock interviews, and regular mock whiteboarding to prepare us for interviewing.

    Now that we're in the search process, we have regular follow-ups with the Career Services team to keep us on pace and make sure we're doing the right things. We check in with a career counselor at least once a week. And if they come across anything good for us in our areas that they know about, then they share that with us. So long as we're actually out there doing our due diligence and trying to find a job, Lambda Schools is also helping us find a job.

    Find out more and read Lambda School reviews on Course Report. Check out the Lambda School website.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/1586/s300/imogen-crispe-headshot.jpg-logo

    Imogen is a writer and content producer who loves writing about technology and education. Her background is in journalism, writing for newspapers and news websites. She grew up in England, Dubai and New Zealand, and now lives in Brooklyn, NY.

  • May 2018 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe5/31/2018

    We read a lot of news about coding bootcamps in May 2018, so we chose the most interesting pieces, and we’re rounding it all up for you in this blog post and podcast! We look at yet another coding bootcamp acquisition, share many wonderful success stories about coding bootcamp graduates, touch on some partnerships between bootcamps and companies, and discuss the role of coding bootcamps in the future of education and talent pipelines. We also chat about diversity in tech at coding bootcamps, and roundup all the new schools, courses, and campuses! Read the roundup below, or listen to the podcast!

    Continue Reading →
  • Beginner's Guide to Swift for iOS

    Liz Eggleston6/19/2018

    So you want to be an iOS developer! You’ve heard of Swift, but you’re not quite sure whether it’s the right programming language for you. In this guide to Swift we ask veteran iOS developer Andrew Madsen, who now leads Lambda School’s remote iOS Major, all about the iOS language Swift. We’ll cover the origins of Swift, the difference between Swift and Objective-C, and what the future looks like for the world of iOS programming. Plus Andrew gives some examples of apps built with Swift, and a few great suggestions to start learning.

    Continue Reading →
  • What is Artificial Intelligence? A Primer with Lambda School

    Lauren Stewart4/2/2018

    Artificial Intelligence encompasses computer science, machine learning, and data science, but what does it all really mean? We spoke with Lambda School’s Director of Machine Learning, Thomson Comer, to get the details. Learn about the history and growth of artificial intelligence, how AI is commonly used today, and see what it takes to succeed in a machine learning course like Lambda School’s Online Data Science Major: Machine Learning! 

    Continue Reading →
  • Alumni Spotlight: Joram Clervius of Lambda School

    Imogen Crispe2/16/2018

    lambda-school-alumni-spotlight-joram-clervius

    Joram Clervius was passionate about music and computers growing up. When college didn’t work out, he used his self-taught computer skills to get a job in web design. Joram soon realized that to build products from scratch, he needed to learn software engineering, so he enrolled in Lambda School’s full-time, online Computer Science and Software Engineering bootcamp. Now Joram is a Senior Developer at software company Nexient! Joram tells us why he chose Lambda School (hint: it’s to do with zero upfront tuition), how he balanced coding with competitive bodybuilding, and why he’s “so thankful” he “went the Lambda route.”

    Q&A

    Can you tell me about your background before Lambda School?

    I’m from Haiti and moved to Florida with my family when I was 10. Throughout elementary school, middle school and high school I was very involved in music, but also had a big interest in computers. I enjoyed taking them apart and teaching myself things. During high school and college, I did some web development and design projects for other students, but it was always just for fun; I never considered programming as a career.

    I earned a music scholarship to Florida A&M University, but I decided to give up my music scholarship to focus on other subjects I was doing well in, like biology and chemistry. I ended up dropping out because I couldn’t figure out how to pay for college and living costs in Tallahassee without a scholarship. I found a job doing web design using basic HTML and CSS at a real estate investment company, where I worked for four years, and taught myself some JavaScript and back end skills on the side.

    Not too long after, I came up with an idea for a startup. I created a business plan, submitted it to the Miami Dade Chamber of Commerce, and won a grant to pay for office space. So I quit my job to start working on it. I soon realized that I couldn’t build my idea without more skills. I started to teach myself software engineering concepts, then enrolled at Lambda School.

    You had already taught yourself web design and some JavaScript, so why did you feel you needed a coding bootcamp?

    Web design is very different from web development and software engineering. It’s like knowing how to make a house look nice, but not knowing how to build the house from scratch because you don’t know how to do electrical wiring, or plumbing, or construction.

    Once I decided that I needed to learn software engineering, I struggled with not knowing where to start. There are so many languages and frameworks. Do I learn Ruby? Do I learn C? Do I learn C++? Do I learn Swift? Do I learn Java?

    To tell you the truth – I’ve experienced what it's like to learn from Lambda School versus what it's like to teach myself, and I am so thankful that I went the Lambda route. There is no way I could have done it by myself.

    How did you choose Lambda School and did you consider other online bootcamps?

    I saw an online ad on Facebook or Twitter for Lambda School and they mentioned their deferred tuition – you didn't have to pay them back until you got a job. I had considered Wyncode and other bootcamps that were close to home in Miami. But I would have had to pay tuition upfront, so when I found out about Lambda School, I was really excited.

    I was also very interested in learning JavaScript, which is something that Lambda School focuses on.

    Did you think about going back to college to study computer science?

    When I attended a demo day at Wyncode, I found that a lot of students had graduated from college with computer science degrees and still needed to go to a coding bootcamp. If you get a computer science degree, you know a lot of the computer science theory and computer architecture, but not so much about frameworks and development languages. I wanted to know how to build software, rather than just the theory behind the tech, so that made me less interested in college.

    What was the application and interview process like for Lambda School?

    I signed up, sent in the application, and received an email saying they had received more applications than they expected, so I'd have to take an entrance exam. That freaked me out because I really wanted to get in. I did the exam, which was mostly logic and math, with no coding. Then a couple of days later I got the email saying that I made it. I was really happy!

    How did you stay engaged while learning online and balance Lambda School with your life?

    Lambda School gave me a full schedule on Google Calendar. From the minute I woke up, I had my whole day planned out for me. Class time was at least eight hours of the day, and I would spend extra time studying outside of class. I was actually interested in learning this stuff, so I spent my nights coding and my weekends working on projects. I started coding from the moment I woke up each day and I have a computer and desk at home, so I just studied from home.

    One of my hobbies is competitive bodybuilding, so I'm very active in the gym and work out a lot. That is a very important part of my day. After I finished studying and doing school work, I would go to the gym and work out, then come back home and continue studying.

    What was the time commitment for Lambda School? Could you learn on your own time (asynchronously) or did you learn with your classmates at the same time every day (synchronously)?

    The instructors taught us through live video lectures, so we could ask them questions, and they'd answer right away. The instructors paired us with other students for pair programming, and we worked on group projects. Every day I was interacting with other students and teachers.

    Lambda School taught the course from the West Coast, which was three hours behind me in Florida. It was actually good for me because I didn't have to wake up as early as everybody else. Most people’s schedules were 9am to 6pm, but I started at 12pm and finished at 9pm.

    Tell us about a typical day at Lambda School.

    One good thing Lambda School does is to make sure students don’t focus on one topic all day long. At the beginning of every day, the very first thing you do is a code challenge. They give you an hour to work on it, then you start the morning lecture and you start learning things that have nothing to do with that code challenge. After that, you move on to working on either a project that was assigned to you the day before, or a new project. The topics get harder as they progress because you start working on multiple concepts at once.

    Who were the other students in your class? Was your Lambda School class diverse?

    Yeah, it was very diverse. I studied with students from all over the country, many different races, women and men, and all age ranges.

    I liked that diversity a lot, because as a black man, especially in software engineering, I’m used to being the only other, the only person who is unique. Whereas at Lambda School, everybody has something unique about them, so that was really nice.

    Lambda School actually has a completely blind entrance program where they don't know the gender or the race of the applicant at all; instead, they just see their answers to the application questions.

    While you were at Lambda School, what was your favorite project that you worked on?

    It was a personal project which I really took to heart. It was a crowdsourced dictionary for Haitian Creole. I built it with React, and I was very proud of it. Before Lambda School, I thought I would need two or three years of React experience before I would be able to build something like that.

    How did Lambda School prepare you for job hunting?

    Lambda School staff reviewed our LinkedIn accounts and our resumes, and told us where to go to apply for jobs depending on what our interests were. Whiteboard practice was the most helpful. Part of web development job interviews is solving problems on a whiteboard, and people can get nervous being put on the spot and having to code in front of other people. Practicing whiteboarding at Lambda School in front of the rest of the class made the hardest part of the job interview much easier.

    Congratulations on your new job! Where are you working and what are you working on?

    I'm a Senior Developer at Nexient LLC. It's in Ann Arbor, Michigan and I think the only completely US-based software services outsourcing company. It's a very big company, and we build software solutions for companies around the country. I've only been here for four weeks and love it. I moved to Michigan especially for the role.

    How did you find the job at Nexient? What was the application process like?

    I found it through a job listing website like Indeed or Dice. I sent Nexient my resume, then I got a callback. After that, I went through two interviews, then received my offer letter. During the interview, they tested I how much I knew and gave me a hard whiteboard question to test my knowledge. Because of that really hard interview process, I surprised myself by making it through.

    The position I applied for was a senior developer role. I just decided that I wasn't going to be afraid to go for it, because my entire life, I’ve always tried to go for hard things.

    How have your first couple of weeks on the job been? How did they onboard you and ramp you up?

    Nexient had an orientation process when I started; they explained what my expectations should be, and what their expectations are for me. I got placed in a team of about six people and I’m doing a lot of work with JavaScript, for a number of different companies.

    Nexient is also a very diverse company, just like Lambda School. There are a lot of women here, and I work with one woman on my team. I like everybody that I've met so far.

    Are you using the same programming languages that you learned at Lambda School or have you had to learn a new language on the job?

    Yeah. Nexient was hiring a JavaScript developer, so I’m mainly using JavaScript.  I'm so much better at JavaScript now than I could have ever taught myself. We use a lot of Reactjs at my job, and a lot of the newer JavaScript concepts in ES6. These are topics that Lambda School drilled into the students.

    After I started working, I had to learn Typescript and some other popular JavaScript packages. It’s a lot easier to learn topics on my own now because one of Lambda School’s methods is teaching students how to teach themselves.

    How is your previous background in web design useful in your new role as a developer?

    It’s very useful. When I first started at Nexient, I asked my supervisor if I could restart one of my projects from scratch. I was able to come up with a whole new design for it, and it looks really nice.

    Now that you have a job, have you started paying back your Lambda School tuition? How does that work?

    Yeah. Once you start working and earning $50,000 or more, then you start paying 17% of your income. You pay that income-share for either two years or until you've paid $30,000.

    What advice do you have for other people who are thinking about making a career change through an online coding bootcamp?

    From my own personal experience, the coding bootcamp model does work, and it works well. As long as you dedicate the time and the energy towards it, you'll reap the benefits 10 fold.

    That being said, it was really hard. With my personality, I’ve found that whenever things are hard, I enjoy them more. I focused hard on Lambda School because it was really hard and I ended up doing really well.

    Find out more and read Lambda School reviews on Course Report. Check out the Lambda School website.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/1586/s300/imogen-crispe-headshot.jpg-logo

    Imogen is a writer and content producer who loves writing about technology and education. Her background is in journalism, writing for newspapers and news websites. She grew up in England, Dubai and New Zealand, and now lives in Brooklyn, NY.

  • Guide to Deferred Tuition and ISAs at Coding Bootcamps

    Imogen Crispe5/23/2018

    coding-bootcamp-deferred-tuition-vs-income-sharing-infographic

    Just as they’ve developed disruptive education tools, technology bootcamps are also adopting payment plans which allow students to pay nothing or very little until they graduate and find a job. Deferred tuition and income sharing agreements (ISAs) are becoming more widely available, and give students who don’t have $20,000 in the bank, access to life-changing learning opportunities. This guide will help you sort through the details and differentiate between the terms; plus, we’ve even helped you start your research by compiling a list of coding and data science bootcamps that offer ISAs or Deferred Tuition.

    Continue Reading →
  • August 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/8/2017

    Why do journalists and industry leaders think that two coding bootcamps are closing? And despite these “shutdowns,” why do companies like IBM still want to hire coding bootcamp graduates? We’re covering all of the industry news from August. Plus, a $3 billion GI Bill that covers coding bootcamps for veterans, why Google and Amazon are partnering with bootcamps, and diversity initiatives. Listen to our podcast or read the full August 2017 News Roundup below.

    Continue Reading →
  • Meet an Online Bootcamp: Lambda School

    Lauren Stewart8/14/2017

    meet-lambda-school-online-coding-bootcamp

    With new funding from Y Combinator, Lambda School has changed up their curriculum and their tuition model, and co-founder Austen Allred gives us the scoop on their new 6-month online coding bootcamp. Using JavaScript and C++ as teaching tools, Lambda School aims to infuse computer science concepts into the curriculum and help students land a job before they pay tuition. Read more about how Lambda School is broadening access to coding education, their bias-blind admissions process, and how they keep students engaged while learning online.

    Our takeaways:

    • If you don’t get a job making over $50,000 a year, then Lambda School doesn’t collect tuition.
    • Your commitment: learning online, full-time, for 6 months.
    • Lambda School is “synchronous” education, which means you’ll need to be online at 9am Pacific and learn with the rest of your cohort.
    • Expect to learn C++ and JavaScript, but also to dive deep into computer science concepts like data structures and learn to scale apps.

    Q&A

    As the co-founder of Lambda School, what is your background and what inspired you to start an online coding bootcamp?

    I was going to college for advertising and found that college was not a very effective use of my time. In fact, my co-founder and I both stumbled upon this idea. I was not in the financial position to afford a bootcamp, so I actually never attended one. I figured out everything on my own by reading books and building projects.

    I wanted to create a more risk-free environment that was accessible to people that didn’t have $10,000 upfront. I had quite a few friends that did a coding bootcamp but didn’t have a good experience – $10,000 or more is a lot to spend at a bootcamp if you don’t get results. We created Lambda School because we wanted a bootcamp (plus a little more) that was free upfront and low risk for students.

    Tuition is an important part of choosing the right bootcamp – explain why Lambda School chose to offer a deferred tuition model.

    First, there are a lot of people who simply can’t afford to pay for a bootcamp upfront – that is obvious to anyone who has ever run a bootcamp. We’re so passionate about that idea that we don’t even require a deposit; it’s 100% free upfront. Even more than that, we wanted our incentives to be entirely aligned with those of the students. Part of our model is that if the student doesn’t get the job making over $50,000 a year, then we don’t make money. That’s very intentional. If we don’t do a good enough job, then we don’t get paid, and we think that’s fair. Bootcamps generally try really hard – but if a student pays $20,000 and can’t get a job, then that’s a really rough deal and we wanted to solve for that.

    We knew we wanted to create a longer course with a lower price-point than other bootcamps. Deferred tuition requires upfront investment by a bootcamp. We could almost fund the deferred tuition model ourselves but partnering with Y Combinator to fund the model certainly helped. Y combinator has done a lot for us – we have about 50 hiring partnerships through them and they understand tech really well. They were primarily excited about Lambda School having a deeper computer science curriculum than the average bootcamp. Y Combinator companies will hire thousands of engineers a year and they need a deeper level of understanding if they’re building world-changing technology.

    Why did you choose to focus the curriculum on JavaScript and C++?

    We use C++ as a teaching tool – it requires you to understand a lot of lower level concepts that get abstracted away in other languages, but are very important to software engineering. Students will have a full-stack JavaScript curriculum to be able to build React apps and React Native apps, but they’ll also understand things at a much deeper level – that’s really the goal.

    What should students expect with this new curriculum?

    We spent a lot of time talking to different employers – we wanted to figure out why some employers will not consider hiring bootcamp graduates. We learned that the best bootcamps will teach data structures and algorithms, but most don’t, and that there are a lot of subjects that bootcamps don’t have time to cover. Subjects like computer architecture, operating systems, scaling – that was the knowledge that employers really wanted their employees to have. And bootcamp grads, almost by definition, don’t understand that material. It’s not that bootcamps do a bad job, but they literally don’t have the time to teach that material.

    Lambda School is not just a coding bootcamp; we also include computer science as part of the curriculum. We’ll cover all the subjects that a bootcamp would, but we’ll also spend a few months giving a deeper understanding of computers and how they work, along with how to build apps to scale. Lambda School offers a more rigorous computer science lesson as opposed to just web development and web applications.

    Has the Lambda School admissions process changed? Tell me about the ideal students for the new deferred tuition model.

    When we were running a shorter bootcamp, we used the traditional interview and coding challenge.

    Now, one of the most important parts of the Lambda School admissions process is that we are entirely race and gender blind. We’ve built an applications process that won’t let us interject our own biases as to which students we accept. We developed a logic-based challenge with behavioral scientists to determine which applicants have the highest aptitude for a technical career. The two things we really look for is innate technical ability and dedication, not necessarily how much you’ve programmed in the past. Can you think analytically? Can you think at a technical level? If you give us someone who is really dedicated and sharp, we know that 6 months later we’ll have a really solid engineer.

    We also have pre-course work, and seeing a student complete that (especially quickly and thoroughly) also helps us know that they’re dedicated.

    Are there time-zone requirements? Do students learn synchronously and need to be online at a certain time each day?

    Yes. Students need to be available from 9 am to 6 pm Pacific. There is no way around this, because everything we do is interactive and live.

    Do you expect students in different cities to see different outcomes?

    In terms of students based in different locations, our main goal is to give as much access to as many people as we can. We originally wanted to host the bootcamp in San Francisco because that’s where the majority of our hiring partners are, but living costs here are expensive so it just didn’t make sense. We offer our bootcamp online so that people can attend from their own city without having to move and pay 6 months of SF rent.

    There are more jobs in bigger cities, but there’s also more competition from them, so we’ve had a lot of success in smaller markets as well.

    Is there required pre-work, or would you recommend taking a pre-course before Lambda School?

    We’ve designed our own pre-course curriculum in-house. We actually want you to apply first and then we send you the pre-course work after your application. Once you’ve completed that pre-course work, then you can begin the application. You don’t need any coding experience before Lambda School – the pre-course material will take you through the basics. It may take you a little bit longer to get through based on where you are in your knowledge but we wanted to create a course where you can just get started and we’ll get you through the rest.

    Do you have assessments or a way to track how students are progressing through the curriculum now that there is a new tuition model?

    We bake that into the curriculum. Everything is live and interactive. We know that there are self-paced, online programs that show you a bunch of videos- we’re not that. Everyone learns through pair programming and working together with other instructors and students. We have a pretty good pulse on our students’ progress- we have daily challenges, and we’re working in Git, so students submit assignments to instructors and we’ll get those pull requests. Each weekly challenge is designed to see how students are doing in the class so that we can dedicate resources where needed.

    Online education has a reputation for low completion rates. How do you keep students engaged while learning online?

    It’s hard to discipline yourself when learning online – if you get stuck there’s no one to turn to and it’s easy to schedule your way out of the course. With Lambda School – we know when you’re online and we monitor when you’re working. There’s no difference between this and a formal classroom because we understand what people are doing throughout the course.

    What types of instructors are teaching at Lambda School? How do they ensure success for their online students?

    Our instructors have taught computer science at Stanford, come from the math program at Berkeley, and others have taught at coding bootcamps. We are matching Ivy league computer science knowledge with coding bootcamp expertise. We look for instructors who have experience teaching. There are a lot of people who are really good developers, but not as knowledgeable when it comes to teaching computer science. We do a good amount of training around ensuring our instructors know how to instruct. We usually give new instructors a trial run during our free mini-bootcamps that are open to the public. That gives us a good idea on whether we bring them on full-time.

    Your incentives are pretty aligned with students getting jobs – how will career services work for students?

    In the last few weeks of the course, we do resume preparation, update portfolios, practice for interviews, and code challenges. We have a career services team that’s there to help students find and land a new job. It all depends on geography. In the Bay Area we have a lot of connections and more partnerships. Outside of the Bay Area and New York, we do not yet have developed partnerships with every single geographic location, but we teach principles that help you find jobs.

    What’s the biggest lesson your team has learned at Lambda School as you’ve been developing this new course?

    First, don’t underestimate people. We’ve met some students who score well on the logic challenges, but for some reason when we talk with them we feel a little uncertain. Those are the people that always outperform. The people that you have to take a risk on and don’t have any other options – they prove that they’re really dedicated.

    One of the biggest misconceptions that we battle is that applicants believe that Lambda School is too good to be true. They even think we’re a scam because it’s different to see a bootcamp that only gets paid if people land a job. Our team would love for everybody to completely understand the bootcamp world, but not everyone has exposure to this learning model. We were surprised at how many people were concerned with degrees and certificates as opposed to skill. If you spend enough time in Silicon Valley, you forget that that’s the way most people think. They don’t understand that degrees are not what matters anymore.

    What is your advice for students embarking on a new online coding program? Any tips for getting the most out of it, especially if they are trying to change their careers?

    Be honest with yourself about what you need. We see a lot of people who say they can teach themselves and that they are dedicated and hardworking, yet two years later they are in the same spot. My biggest recommendation is to understand that it’s okay to have help. It’s okay to have someone else write the curriculum. It’s really hard to learn things when you don’t entirely understand what you need to learn. Have humility, work hard, and be honest with yourself if a self-paced program isn’t working for you. Don’t be afraid to make the changes you need to provide a structure that works for you.

    Lambda School starts new classes at the beginning of each month. Read Lambda School Reviews on Course Report.

    About The Author

    https://course_report_production.s3.amazonaws.com/rich/rich_files/rich_files/4484/s300/lauren-stewart-headshot.jpg-logo

    Lauren is a communications and operations strategist who loves to help others find their idea of success. She is passionate about techonology education, career development, startups, and the arts. Her background includes career/youth development, public affairs, and philanthropy. She is from Richmond, VA and now currently resides in Los Angeles, CA.

  • Guide to Coding Bootcamps with Job Guarantees

    Imogen Crispe6/28/2017

    guide-to-coding-bootcamp-job-guarantees

    So you want to land a job after coding bootcamp? The statistics are on your side – 73% of bootcampers report being employed as developers after graduation. But did you know that many coding bootcamps go one step further and offer a job guarantee? We’ve put together a list of in-person and online coding bootcamps in the USA and around the world which offer guaranteed job placement. And don’t get caught off guard by the details – we’ve also included specifics about job guarantee tuition refunds, conditions, and tips to help you work out if a job guarantee coding bootcamp is right for you.

    Continue Reading →
  • Episode 12: March 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe7/21/2017

    Haven’t had time to keep up with all the coding bootcamp news this March? Not to worry– we’ve compiled it for you in a handy blog post and podcast. This month, we read a lot about CIRR and student outcomes reporting, we heard from reporters and coding bootcamp students about getting hired after coding bootcamp, a number of schools announced exciting diversity initiatives, and we added a handful of new schools to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • How to Get Work Experience Before You Graduate from Coding Bootcamp

    Imogen Crispe3/23/2017

    tips-to-get-work-experience-before-graduating-coding-bootcamp

    How do you get a job after coding bootcamp if you have no relevant, real-world work experience? Only 1.4% of bootcampers have worked as developers in the past, but most career-changers have little – if any– client experience when they start looking for a developer job. Some bootcamps help students overcome this hurdle by offering opportunities to work for the bootcamp itself, or with real clients through projects, internships, and apprenticeships. These opportunities can give students substantial experience to add to their portfolios and resumes, and kickstart the job hunt.

    Continue Reading →
  • Ultimate Guide to Mobile Development Bootcamps

    Lauren Stewart2/10/2017

    app-development-bootcamps-infographic

    There’s something about a good mobile app that just helps you throughout the day– be it your Linkedin, Google maps, CNN, Nike+ Training, or ESPN app– we depend on our smartphones for a lot. Due to the global rise of smartphones and tablets, mobile apps can be the go-to source for information, entertainment, productivity, e-commerce, and more. By 2020, global mobile app store downloads will reach 288.4 billion! With the rise of mobile applications on the market, the demand for mobile software developers continues to grow. We thought it was only right to give you a breakdown of what it really takes to be a mobile applications developer. From educational requirements to general stats on the profession to the top mobile coding bootcamps around the world– read below for our Ultimate Guide to Mobile Development Bootcamps.

    Continue Reading →
  • Learn to Code (for Free) at these Coding Bootcamps!

    Harry Hantel5/11/2015

    code-for-free-at-these-bootcamps

    While programming bootcamps can offer a high return on investment, the average tuition at code school is ~$11,400, which is no small sacrifice. A number of not-for-profit and well-organized programs offer free coding bootcamps. Some of these bootcamps are funded by job placement and referral fees; others are fueled by community support and volunteers. Expect rigorous application processes and competitively low acceptance rates, but for the right applicants, there is so much to gain at these free coding bootcamps. 

    Continue Reading →

Thanks!