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Grand Circus

Detroit, Grand Rapids

Grand Circus

Avg Rating:4.13 ( 16 reviews )

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Recent Grand Circus Reviews: Rating 4.13

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2 Campuses

Detroit

6 Courses
1570 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI 48226

Our Front-End Bootcamp focuses on JavaScript (or JS), a dynamic programming language most often used to create interactivity in web pages. JavaScript supports object-oriented programming and is highly adaptable. It’s even used in non-browser environments like cars and microwaves!

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Learn the basics of the internet with our HTML & CSS class. This six session course is intended for individuals who want a comprehensive introduction to both HTML and CSS. Through coding exercises, lecture, and focused homework assignments, students will develop the skills needed to build your first website.

Course Details

Financing
Scholarship
Automatic $1,000 scholarship for veterans, women, and anyone who is a part of an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.

So you’ve already mastered HTML & CSS and you want your website to be more interactive? Then this is the class for you! Our twelve-session, six-week course Intro to Web Development Part 2 in-depth course is built for individuals who already have a strong understanding of HTML & CSS; lookin’ at you, Intro to Development Part One: HTML + CSS grads! If you’ve taken a GDI Intermediate HTML & CSS workshop, this course is calling your name as well. You’ll learn the basics of JavaScript and jQuery to make your website interactive and exciting.

Course Details

Financing
Scholarship
Automatic $1,000 scholarship for veterans, women, and anyone who is a part of an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.

Think of our Front-End Part-Time Bootcamp as an executive style coding bootcamp. You’ll get to continue your day job while learning a new skill to move into a new department at work, or onto a completely new company. In this case, the skill is JavaScript and a whole host of other programming languages and skills.

Course Details

Financing
Scholarship
Automatic $1,000 scholarship for veterans, women, and anyone who is a part of an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.
Interview
Yes

OVERVIEW .NET is a programming framework developed Microsoft and used the around the world in enterprise development. More importantly, it is in high demand among employers in Metro Detroit. Our .NET (C#) Developer Bootcamp is 10 weeks - two weeks are at home self-paced lectures, followed by 8 weeks Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm in downtown Detroit. It is intense, but in this bootcamp you will learn fundamental programming concepts necessary to apply to junior web developer positions. TELL ME MORE Our .NET (C#) Developer Bootcamp will introduce you to the fundamentals of enterprise development (.NET), the use of Visual Studio, methods using SQL databases, and how to design and deploy object-oriented applications. We cover the core software development skills that all .NET based web developers need. Units are divided by tiers and cover core server-side business logic and client side programming, and similar server side programming and persistence. To provide sufficient depth, concepts are taught using one of the most popular tools for a given tier, with an overview of other similar tools that are also popular in today’s job market. By graduation day, you’ll not only know the difference between ASP.NET and ActiveX, but you’ll graduate with a project you’ll be proud to show off to employers at Demo Day. WHAT YOU’LL LEARN During this course, some of the concepts you’ll learn include: A thorough, hands-on understanding of .NET development The lifecycle of a .NET project VB and C# language syntax The mechanics of developing for .NET using Visual Studio Debugging and testing of .NET projects How to program web applications with ASP.NET How to access databases with ADO.NET

Course Details

Financing
Scholarship
Automatic $1,000 scholarship for veterans, women, and anyone who is a part of an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.
Interview
Yes

Java is one of the most popular programming languages in the US and is one of the most in-demand languages from employers nationally. Whether you want to create a mobile app or learn the language used to build LinkedIn, Java is a great place to start. It’s a programming language that can be used across platforms, scale without compromising security, and handle extreme traffic. That’s why Google uses Java to handle the (on average) 40,000 searches per second. Continuing on from our successful QA, .NET, and Android Bootcamps, Grand Circus is excited to offer a class for Detroiters looking to enter the world of development as a Java developer. This will be an intensive learning experience involving classroom exercises and group projects to prepare students for the rigors of the workplace. Over the course of 8 weeks, students will establish a strong, work-ready understanding of Java and be positioned to start their career as an entry-level Java developer.

Course Details

Financing
Scholarship
Automatic $1,000 scholarship for veterans, women, and anyone who is a part of an ethnic minority group underrepresented in tech.
Interview
Yes

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11/27/2017
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Our latest on Grand Circus

  • October 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/5/2017

    October 2017 was a busy month for the coding bootcamp industry with news about growing pains in bootcamp outcomes, mergers, acquisitions, investments, a trend towards bootcamp B2B training, and diversity initiatives. To help you out, we’ve collected all the most important news in this blog post and podcast. Plus, we added 12 new schools from around the world to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • August 2017 Coding Bootcamp News + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe12/8/2017

    Why do journalists and industry leaders think that two coding bootcamps are closing? And despite these “shutdowns,” why do companies like IBM still want to hire coding bootcamp graduates? We’re covering all of the industry news from August. Plus, a $3 billion GI Bill that covers coding bootcamps for veterans, why Google and Amazon are partnering with bootcamps, and diversity initiatives. Listen to our podcast or read the full August 2017 News Roundup below.

    Continue Reading →
  • June 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe6/29/2017

    Missed any news about coding bootcamps from June 2017? Course Report is here for you! We’ve compiled the most important news and developments in this blog post and podcast. In June, we heard John Oliver and Megyn Kelly talk about bootcamps, we read about new investments in bootcamps, a number of newspapers wrote about the impact bootcamps are having at a local level, and we were excited to hear about more diversity initiatives and scholarships. Plus we round up all the new campuses and new coding bootcamps around the world.

    Continue Reading →
  • Episode 14: May 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast

    Imogen Crispe6/5/2017

    Need an overview of coding bootcamp news in May? You’re in the right place! We’ve collected all the most important news in this blog post and podcast. This month, we read about a number of insightful surveys about employers, programming languages, and learners. We read advice about choosing a bootcamp, learned about efforts to encourage women and veterans to learn to code, and heard about student experiences at bootcamp. Plus, we added a bunch of interesting new schools to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • Episode 13: April 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup + Podcast

    Imogen Crispe7/21/2017

    Missed out on coding bootcamp news in April? Never fear, Course Report is here! We’ve collected everything in this handy blog post and podcast. This month, we read about why outcomes reporting is useful for students, how a number of schools are working to boost their diversity with scholarships, we heard about student experiences at bootcamp, plus we added a bunch of interesting new schools to the Course Report school directory! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

    Continue Reading →
  • Episode 11: February 2017 Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast

    Imogen Crispe3/1/2017

    Here’s what we found ourselves reading and discussing in the Course Report office in February 2017! We found out the three most in-demand programming languages, we read about how coding could be the new blue collar job, and looked at how new schools are tweaking the bootcamp model to fit their communities. Plus, we hear about a cool app for NBA fans built by coding bootcamp graduates! Read below or listen to our latest Coding Bootcamp News Roundup Podcast.

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  • Student Spotlight: Mark Bann of Grand Circus

    Liz Eggleston8/19/2015

    After several years teaching algebra and biology, Mark Bann was turned on to programming, so he used his summer break to learn Java at Detroit’s Grand Circus Java Bootcamp. We sat down with Mark to talk about why the bootcamp model appeals to him as a teacher, the feedback loop at Grand Circus, and his final project improving riders’ experience with Detroit’s People Mover.

    What were you up to before starting at Grand Circus?

    I graduated in December of 2012 with a degree in secondary education, specifically math and biology. After that I took two long-term substitute teacher positions, which turned into a full-time job for the two years teaching algebra and biology.

    This past school year ended June 12th and then the Grand Circus bootcamp started the following Wednesday.

    So you did not take a summer break.

    No, no summer break at all!

    During your undergrad, did you ever take a computer science class?

    No; May is a rough month for teachers. My cousin who is in the computer science world and has a Masters in Computer Science heard me complaining and told me to looking into computer programming. He also knew someone who had done the Java bootcamp at Grand Circus before.

    I was talking to another student at Grand Circus who has a CS degree and he said that a bootcamp might even be a better way to learn because it seems like in a computer science bachelor’s program, they talk a lot about theory but don’t actually get their hands dirty with coding. We’ve talked about theory during the bootcamp but it’s been more hands-on actual programming.

    Is your goal to get a job as a junior developer after you graduate?

    I’m starting to apply and am looking for jobs in the software development world. I love everything that I went into teaching for but there are things I’ve learned that make it less appealing.

    If I can get a job in software development and even use my educational background to stay in the world of education, I would love that. But my goal is to get a job where I’m going to continue to learn, hopefully at the same rate that I’m learning now and just progress in this career.

    Did you look at any other bootcamps when you were doing your research or just Grand Circus?

    Well, in Michigan there aren’t a lot of options. There are certain workshops like Girl Develop It and Black Girls Code, but based on their names, I didn’t think they would be a good fit for me. Plus, those are workshops, and in terms of actual bootcamps, there was nothing else I could find unless I was willing to move. I have a house and a pregnant wife; I wasn’t going anywhere!

    What was the application process like for you at Grand Circus? Did you have to do a technical interview, was there a coding challenge?

    They were pretty sly about some of those things. Looking back, the answer is yes, but I didn’t realize it at the time.

    The first step was an application online. The question I specifically remember is “How would you explain to a robot how to make your bed?” I probably wrote out 40 steps. I think that was a somewhat “technical” interview because it’s designed for people like me who had absolutely no experience.

    After that, there was a group interview. First, a phone interview that felt like a fairly casual conversation or a culture interview. Then a group interview where we were given a challenge: three minutes to make a Ping-Pong ball launcher with three other people.

    Had you done Codecademy or another online course before you applied?

    When I started looking at Grand Circus, I thought I would try to get a little bit of a head start. I just went through the HTML/CSS tracks, and got halfway through the JavaScript course on Codecademy. Nothing Java though.

    Was the fact that you were learning Java important to you? Grand Circus teaches an iOS boot camp and a Front-End Bootcamp too- why did you choose that class in particular?

    The number one factor was that it fit perfectly during my summer vacation, so I could keep a nice safety net of my teaching job.

    Any language they would’ve offered over the summer, I would’ve taken. That being said, when I was researching, it seemed like you could start with any language and learn from there. So I wasn’t as concerned about the language as I was the timing.

    I could also use what I learn at Grand Circus in the classroom if I want to go back to teaching, so it just seemed like a no-lose situation for me.

    How did you pay for the class? Did you have savings or did you get a scholarship?

    I had savings. They do offer some scholarships here. It seemed like there were two for minorities in coding and another that was for if you have plans for bringing up Detroit.

    How many people are in your cohort?

    13, including me.

    Did it feel like a diverse cohort in terms of age, race, gender?

    Yeah; there are only three women in the class. When one of them is absent, you can really see the difference! Someone from Grand Circus made a comment at the very beginning of our bootcamp that our breakdown wasn’t really indicative of their typical bootcamp demographics though. As far as age goes, I would say there was a 15-20 year range.

    Is everybody on a similar technical level?

    There were definitely a few of us that had no background at all. There were a couple that had a lot of front end training with HTML and CSS or JavaScript. I know there was at least one person that had a C or C++ background. For the most part, people had no idea what they were doing – including me.

    Who were your instructors?

    The instructor is Jayashree Ravi. She has taught courses at Wayne State and she does web development as well. She’s awesome and does a really good job.

    It can be frustrating at times because she doesn’t hold your hand through things and if she did, we wouldn’t get nearly as much out of it.

    As a teacher and an education major; what do you think of the teaching style? Is it completely different than traditional education?

    It’s basically how almost every teacher wants to teach. When students need more time on a topic, we spend another day on it, no problem. I would love to do that when I’m teaching high school but there’s just no time.

    I think it’s fantastic. I think the model is very good. Basically, once someone finishes a task, she’ll give us a little more time for the person to go a little bit further or for other people to catch up and then she has someone present the project. We’ve definitely done a lot of learning from each other. It’s a very student-centered classroom.

    How many hours a week would you say you’re spending on Grand Circus?

    This bootcamp is 10am to 5:00pm every day with a half-hour lunch. There are plenty of times when I’ve got the project fully done and ready to go for the next day and I don’t have to do anything, so I look for jobs or whatever, or just practice old assignments. There are other times when you need to put in a few hours outside of class.

    I would say on average between 40 and 50 hours. I don’t feel like I’m working as hard as when I was teaching. Maybe that’s just because I’m enjoying a lot of things more.

    Is there a set curriculum? Do you know what’s coming up the next day?

    Yeah. Usually the program director will send us a message on Friday and tell us what the outline is for next week. It has the book pages that we should read if we want to.

    On one day the pages could be in the 180 page range; so there’s no way you’re going to actually read everything ahead of time but we have an idea of where we’re going, always.

    What’s the book called that you’re using?

    It’s called Programming Java.

    Are there things that you didn’t expect or that you would change going into the next cohort and what’s the feedback loop like?

    It’s almost scary how quickly they implement feedback. That’s probably the thing I’ve been most impressed with; we have a Wednesday survey every week. Then on Friday typically we do one-on-one meetings where they pull each individual and have a conversation about what’s going well, what’s not going well, any problems, any concerns, what we hope for – and they are actually listening.

    We have instructors and two programmers just for the Java bootcamp and like I said, there’s 13 of us in the class, so that ratio is incredible. There are a lot of ears listening to things that we’re saying.

    Can you tell us about the project you’re working on?

    Yes, this is our final project. We all made our pitches today and then they gave us our group assignments. My group of three is building something to make the People Mover more useful.

    What’s the People Mover?

    Oh man! The People Mover is Detroit transportation. It’s like the subway but it’s floating up in the sky and it goes in one direction in a nice, continuous loop all around Detroit, and has 12 or 15 stops.

    Our application shows exactly what you can do at each station- restaurants, entertainment, parks etc within walking distance from that station.

    Will you work on that for two weeks?

    Right. We are all presenting on the same day in August. Grand Circus does a really good job at getting companies to come in and watch the presentations, even if they have nothing to do with what we’re presenting.

    You said that you had been looking for jobs after class. What are you finding? What is the Detroit tech scene like and what’s the job market like for developers?

    Well, I’m still learning. Companies include HP, GM and other auto industries. Then there are a ton of startups. Detroit has a lot of opportunities. StubHub is actually right downstairs, Fathead is just down the road.

    Within metro Detroit, there are a lot of options. It seems like every week I get an update and it’s got another 15 jobs that have been posted just for the search terms of “Junior – Java”

    I’ve been using Dice and Glass Door. There’s also Indeed and Monster and aggregators like that. Dice is specifically catering to tech jobs so that’s been the primary one that I’m going to.

    Even if you go back to your job as a teacher and don’t get a job as a programmer, do you think that it was worth the money?

    Absolutely; it’s weird, the air conditioning broke the other day  and I was thinking about it the same way was thinking about debugging a program. And it worked, we finally got it figured out. The skills are transferable to so many other things. It’s just logical thinking; so it’s totally worth it.

     

    To learn more about Grand Circus, visit their School Page on Course Report or check out the Grand Circus website here!